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delmonicos

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my husband and i took a friend in from out of town here last week. hadnt been in a number of years as there are so many new places always to try. but wow--it was excellent! we shared numerous small plates and medium plates. they were all wonderful but the standouts were the special gnocchi with veal ragu, the sausage crostini, the steak tartar and the octopus with anise toast. the service was friendly, efficient, and well paced. it's an old one but still a very good one.

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  1. I love Delmonico's. The general manger is a great guy and the food is outstanding. The room is spectacular and the service is good.

    4 Replies
    1. re: Littleman

      Sounds like what we encountered. The total experience was great, and the only let-down was regarding the wines, and wine service, though that was more than passable. Were I hired as a consultant, that would be the only area that I would recommend much more work, and primarily with the staff, and not the wine list, which was very good. The wines were mostly really good choices for the fare, and fairly priced for that level of restaurant in a "resort"city. The staff just needed a bit of work - "after class homework," with the sommelier. Can't find my notes now [Review must still be around?] but IIRC, the stemware needs an upgrade.

      Hunt

      1. re: Bill Hunt

        question -- im not a wine guy so i wouldnt know.. but how many places do you come across that have pro-grade stemware? ive seen you mention it a couple of times so im kinda curious. what makes it an upgrade?

        1. re: kibbles

          You know, that just depends. In very general terms, the Deep South seems less inclined to "kick it up a notch." However, there have been exceptions. As an example, Blackberry Farm, Walland, TN, has wonderful and ideal stemware, and is in the "middle of nowhere."

          I find fewer issues with high-end restaurants on the West Coast, but because of the "wine culture" there, I think that should be expected.

          The East Coast has been a mixed bag. We just got back from NYC, and saw that "mixed bag" up close, and personal. Restaurant Daniel was excellent. We had ordered a bottle of Puligney Montrachet (a fairly "big" Chardonnay) at the bar, while waiting for our table. The bartender placed a pair of Riedel Vinum (upper-middle of their line) Montrachet stems in front of us. These look a bit like a more traditional "Burgundy Balloon," that one would serve a red Burg, or Pinot Noir in, but are not quite so fluted at the top - more open, like the Pinot Noir glass had been cut off, about 1/4 of the way down. Then, we did the full tasting-menu w/ the "sommelier's pairing" with 9 wines, IIRC. Each, though a B-T-G selection was served in the appropriate glass. Most were Riedel's with a few others in the mix. Still, all were very good, with thin walls and square, non-beaded rims. This followed through a Sauternes and a Port - perfect stemware.

          Fast forward to a high-end Italian restaurant. The stemware was lower-end, restaurant grade glass, and ill-suited for their rather extensive older red Italian wines. Not horrible, but with a US$400 bottle, I do want the most I can get from that wine, and cheap glasses just do not cut it.

          At the bar at the Manhattan Intercontinental, we had very nice stems, even for their B-T-G offerings.

          Last night, I ordered a nice Joseph Drouhin Pugliney Montrachet for our table at an event. This was being held at one of the Astoria Collection hotels, and one that fancies itself to be a very high-end dining destination, with a very deep and expensive wine list. The stemware was again ill-suited, but this WAS an event, so while I was not really happy, could overlook the choices offered, offered outside of their main restaurant.

          We now travel with a few pieces of stemware, though not always. Also, there have been times that we have had it in our hotel, but not brought it with us to a restaurant, just assuming that they WOULD have nice glasses.

          What really aggravates me is a restaurant, that has good stemware, but refuses to use it, unless one is spending over US$1200 on a bottle of wine. I have no issue saying, "I see that you have Riedel Sommelier stems (pointing to a near-by table), and I would like those, please." I've had a few, that would serve my bottle of X with good glasses, and then whisk those off the table, when we'd do the sommelier's tastings, with the B-T-G selections. Heck, those are often the wines that benefit most from being served in good stems.

          To many, a Dixie cup, or jelly jar might be just fine. To me, they are not. I greatly appreciate a restaurant that knows the difference. To me, it shows that the restaurant both knows, and also cares.

          Hope that explains my feelings on the issue.

          Enjoy,

          Hunt

          1. re: kibbles

            Your question got me to thinking and wondering, so I posted to the Wine Board, to see if I am the only person, who cares about the wine glasses: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/759982

            I'll be interested to see if I am just a "stemware snob."

            Thanks for asking,

            Hunt

      2. Dined there some years ago, and much was excellent, with a few aspects just in the good range. Note: I grade hard, and especially on anything regarding wine, and the wine service. I'd go back, and have recommended them for many.

        Glad that you enjoyed, as NOLA is all about enjoyment, especially regarding the food.

        Thank you,

        Hunt