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7-bone chuck roast - your best recipes please

d
Diane in Bexley Jan 9, 2011 07:15 AM

The butcher had 7 bone chuck roasts (yeah bones! so hard to find lately) on sale. I bought 2, each about 3-4 lbs. Looking for something different - I do the usual and want to try a different flavor profile. No tomatoes please, one family member can't have that. Looking for a braising recipe that will yield yummy leftovers for another meal during the week or I can put away in freezer. Thanks!

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  1. greygarious Jan 9, 2011 07:21 AM

    All depends on what your "usual" is. 7-bone 101 is to slather on a mixture of sliced onion, dry onion soup mix, and condensed cream of mushroom soup, cover, and put in a low oven for several hours. It has a lot of flavor, and lots of gravy, despite not being seared first.

    1 Reply
    1. re: greygarious
      poofty Jan 9, 2011 07:30 AM

      add some beef broth to to gg recipe for even more tasty gravy

    2. d
      Diane in Bexley Jan 9, 2011 07:35 AM

      Sorry but dry onion soup mix and Campbell's soup are not what I had in mind. I am looking for something a little more interesting and without all the extra salt and stuff you get from "convenience" products. A beef bourgignon recipe? A goulash? Something that calls for fresh ingredients. Thanks!

      2 Replies
      1. re: Diane in Bexley
        b
        bear Jan 9, 2011 08:39 AM

        My son and I made this recipe from the Boston Globe Magazine section last week, and agreed that it is quite good. We pretty much followed the recipe as written, and happened to use two small 7-bone roasts cut into 1 1/2-2" chunks, and then put the bones in the stock for extra flavoring. If we had had time, we would have roasted the bones for a bit of extra flavor. Oh, and we didn't dredge the meat in flour to brown it. I would add the flour after sauteeing the onions and garlic, before adding the beer.

        http://www.boston.com/bostonglobe/mag...

        1. re: bear
          s
          Snorkelvik Jan 11, 2011 07:10 AM

          Awesome! I just picked up Cook's Ill's Cover & Bake from the library & decided to switch out the usual beef stew for their beef goulash.

          Getting ready for the next big storm here in NYC....

      2. Hank Hanover Jan 9, 2011 08:17 AM

        I use a typical pot roast recipe with onions, carrots and either wedged potatoes or little whole red new potatoes.

        I season and sear the roast. I don't dredge mine in flour.

        I use some beef broth sometimes augmented with "better than bouillon" beef base.

        Towards the end I add whatever spices I'm going to (usually thyme and maybe some italian seasoning).

        At the end, I remove the veggies and meat then defat the liquid, add some corn starch slurry maybe puree some of the veggies back into the sauce and serve.

        The next day, I cut up the leftover meat into pieces, add the left over veggies and sauce. I usually need to add veggies and or broth to make more sauce. Heat it up and serve it over egg noodles.

        1. c oliver Jan 11, 2011 07:00 AM

          Okay now, don't think I'm crazy for giving you a PORK recipe! This is the famous Will Owen pork shoulder recipe. I've now done it with pork multiple times, lamb shoulder once and even ham (that was an accident as we were in Rio and I couldn't read the label). I've been intending to do it with beef. You could change the seasonings if you wish but this technique ought to be fine. I love it and so does everyone I serve it to.

          http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/582610

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