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Ok, I give up, fried oysters

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Nanzi Jan 6, 2011 09:45 AM

When I cook fried oysters, the breading comes off in the pan. I am using butter to fry in. I use an egg to dip, then bread crumbs.
Please fix me up with your best method and recipe. We love em, but the presentation us pretty
'crumby'. Thanks and thanks for this website, I have learned much here.

  1. nomadchowwoman Jan 7, 2011 10:18 AM

    I'm in the just-roll-'em-in-whatever-you-like camp, for a light crisp coating. They're wet so it will cling. The egg wash makes for too much breading, imho. I find deep-frying (and you really don't need a lot of oil) at 350 or thereabouts seals them, keeping them juicy inside.

    1. rcallner Jan 7, 2011 09:30 AM

      We're blessed with easy access to fresh oysters that grow right here. Various breadings are fun, but the far and away tastiest, crisp outside unctuous inside really taste the oyster don't feel like you've eaten a sack of Portland cement afterward technique is really simple - take the oysters in their own brine, season some rice flour (it's finer than wheat flour), lightly coat the oysters with that by shaking in a bag, shake off excess, and pan-fry (don't crowd the pan) in canola or peanut oil 'til crisp and light brown outside. Lemon juice, or a little cocktail sauce, and you're in shellfish heaven. If you're cooking enough to have them stack up before they're devoured, keep warm on a rack in a low oven.

      1. k
        kathleen440 Jan 7, 2011 08:55 AM

        I'm in the traditional camp - lightly roll in cornmeal and deep-fry in peanut or vegetable oil. When they float and turn golden brown, they're done.

        I think the egg is the problem - there's so much moisture there that the bread crumbs aren't able to cling to the oyster. I'd say that cornmeal alone is by far the best, but if you must use an egg wash, batter them with AP flour rather than bread crumbs.

        1. s
          Sharuf Jan 7, 2011 08:23 AM

          My hands-on learning process has taught me this -- when frying oysters or razor clams, bread them with plenty of lag time for the coating to settle in before putting them in the pan. Just the opposite of making scallopini, where you have to put them into the pan immediately after the flour dredging because if you let them sit around they will end up covered in wallpaper paste.

          1 Reply
          1. re: Sharuf
            n
            Nanzi Jan 7, 2011 08:35 AM

            Thank you all for your most excellent ideas and help. They will certainly be on next weeks menu.

          2. Will Owen Jan 6, 2011 11:02 AM

            My one attempt at deep-frying oysters was making Hangtown Fry … at a fundraising party! Talk about walking a tightrope without a net! I had a brand-new deep-fryer I'd never used before, and a recipe I'd only just found. Luckily I had an hour before the thing started and an all-but-bottomless supply of freshly-shucked oysters, so by the time I'd thoroughly screwed up a dozen or so I was ready for prime time. The method prescribed in my recipe called for a double-dip: egg, then crumbs. This was a disaster. A friend who is quite frankly not much of a cook had the bright idea of flouring the things first, and she saved the day. They did need to be patted dry first and then very quickly run through the process, but once they were fried they became very easy to handle. And then, since the dish is "pretty" only to people who love eggs and oysters, those of us who fell into that category wound up eating most of it. Golly, what a chore …

            1. a
              AdamD Jan 6, 2011 10:57 AM

              True true, deep frying is preferred.
              But you can still pan fry em as you would a cutlet.
              Different, but still delicious.

              1 Reply
              1. re: AdamD
                Uncle Bob Jan 6, 2011 11:05 AM

                The only time I pan fry oysters, is when I doing (My Version) of Hang Town Fry ~~

                Enjoy!

              2. h
                Helene Goldberg Jan 6, 2011 10:44 AM

                Frankly, I found that simple is better here. I use very hot olive oil and only roll the oysters in salted flour. Perfect. Crispy.

                1. Uncle Bob Jan 6, 2011 10:16 AM

                  Use a high smoke point oil....Peanut, Corn, Soybean....
                  Heat oil to a minimum of 360* ~~~ I start at 375*
                  Very lightly salt the oysters...(If needed)
                  Roll/coat them well in Cornmeal....Cornflour if you just gotta....Or a mixture of the two ( Heavy on the meal.)
                  Deep fry in small batches...depending on size from 90 seconds to 2 minutes. ~~ Listen!!! They will tell you when they're done. Listen!!!
                  Drain on racks ....Serve.

                  4 Replies
                  1. re: Uncle Bob
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                    hazelhurst Jan 6, 2011 10:21 AM

                    I always watch for them to begin to pop up and pull them then.

                    1. re: hazelhurst
                      n
                      Nanzi Jan 6, 2011 10:26 AM

                      We are about to put the deep fryer back into service. This might be the first thing I do in it.
                      Thanks for the help.

                      1. re: hazelhurst
                        Uncle Bob Jan 6, 2011 10:31 AM

                        At pop up, they are real close for sure....I usually go just a few seconds longer....I like a good crunch!!! ~~~ It's all good my friend!!

                      2. re: Uncle Bob
                        arashall Jan 6, 2011 10:50 AM

                        Uncle Bob knows what he's talkin' about! Good oysters don't need anything but a little cornmeal. Give it a try :-)

                      3. a
                        AdamD Jan 6, 2011 10:09 AM

                        After you bread them, place them on a platter and sprinkle the leftover breading on top. Then put them in the fridge for an hour or two. Then let them sit at room temp for 15 mins before frying.

                        You could also double dip them-i.e. dip and bread twice.

                        3 Replies
                        1. re: AdamD
                          n
                          Nanzi Jan 6, 2011 10:14 AM

                          Thanks Adam, I will try that. Is butter the right thing to fry them in? I'd thought maybe that was the problem, or the temp of the skillet(iron).

                          1. re: Nanzi
                            pikawicca Jan 6, 2011 10:25 AM

                            Do NOT use butter. Use peanut oil.

                            1. re: Nanzi
                              a
                              AdamD Jan 6, 2011 10:26 AM

                              You can fry them in butter.
                              As noted below, deep fried with cornmeal breading is the traditional way, but you can pan fry them. Its a different texture, but still very good. I like it because I don't have to use a lot of oil just to cook one batch.
                              You can also add a touch of oil to the butter to raise the smoking point if you wish. Cast iron pan is perfect. Depending on how "seasoned" yours is, you may need to add a bit more fat in order to reduce the amount of contact with the bottom of the pan. You really want them sitting in the butter rather than browning on the bottom of the pan.
                              Hope this helps!

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