HOME > Chowhound > Home Cooking >

Par baked cookies

t
tomatoaday Jan 5, 2011 11:48 AM

I want to bake cookies most of the way and finish them for the last 3 or 4 minutes in the oven so they can be served warm and just fully baked. This would be for a cafe location where we want to have fresh, hot cookies (especially chocolate chip) quickly but don't want to reheat fully cooked cookies and serve something dried out or over cooked. Does anyone do this and if so, to what stage do you bake them, just starting to brown on the bottom but still soft out to the edges? Assuming total bake time is 16 - 18 minutes, pull them out at 12? Thanks for any help - I prefer to start with a pretty firm time rather than have to try many partially baked cookies.

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
  1. todao RE: tomatoaday Jan 5, 2011 12:15 PM

    Cookies can be par-baked but I don't know how long they can be held unless they're frozen, in which case they'll hold for a long time. A lot of the commercially prepared cookies you find in your supermarket are par -baked. Best suggestion I can offer is to experiment with half a dozen of your cookies on different baking sheets baked for different times and held in identical conditions before returning to the oven.

    1 Reply
    1. re: todao
      t
      tomatoaday RE: todao Jan 5, 2011 01:06 PM

      Good idea about the freezing, I didn't think about that. I would expect that if we bake them from frozen it would only add a minute or so to the baking time. Thanks for the idea!

    2. a
      AGM_Cape_Cod RE: tomatoaday Jan 5, 2011 01:15 PM

      For biscotti I do the first bake and then freeze the loaf. When I need it I just defrost and slice for the second bake. They come out just as if they were fully baked originally.

      1. chowser RE: tomatoaday Jan 5, 2011 02:10 PM

        Is there a reason you want to par bake them, instead of keeping cookie dough on hand? If it's just for a day or two, I'll leave the cookie dough in the refrigerator. If it's longer, I make up cookie dough balls, put on a tray to freeze and then put them in a zip lock bag. They last for months that way. It'll take just a few minutes longer baking from dough than finishing a par baked cookie.

        Oh, for really quick cookies, cookie dough in a panini press is ready in a couple of minutes and are surprisingly good.

        2 Replies
        1. re: chowser
          t
          tomatoaday RE: chowser Jan 6, 2011 08:00 AM

          I'm looking for a procedure to be able to serve just baked warm cookies as a dessert in a restaurant without baking dough from scratch for each order. A plate that takes 4 to 5 minutes to finish rather than 12 to 14 is a lot different in restaurant kitchen time. I want a tender middle, crisp edges and warm enough so that chocolate is melty but not molten. Since it has egg in the dough I need to be able to have it cook enough to be safe until finished but not baked so much that I am reheating (and overbaking) a fully cooked cookie.

          1. re: tomatoaday
            hotoynoodle RE: tomatoaday Jan 6, 2011 08:56 AM

            par-cooking and freezing will work just fine. as far as tender middles and crisp edges, that will depend more on the original recipe. i.e. amount of sugar and butter, etc. some recipes make softer end products than do others.

        Show Hidden Posts