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Steamed Chicken with Ginger Scallion Sauce in Manhattan?

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Hi all,

I've been looking for the steamed chicken (half/whole) that is served, on the bone, cut into chunks with the skin on, with a side dish of grated ginger dipping sauce with oil, scallion and salt? I don't actually know the name of it...

Does anyone know where the best is in Manhattan? I've been craving it! I've seen it in Chinatown but there are so many places and I don't know which one is good. Plus, if anyone knows of places that serve this and also take credit card?

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  1. Great NY Noodletown

    1 Reply
    1. re: AubWah

      NY Noodletown's chicken of this sort is great. You can just point at the chicken and say green sauce. NY Noodletown doesn't take credit cards. IME (in my experience), more authentic places rarely take credit cards. I think their margins are too thin for the balance between revenue and credit card fees to work for them to take the cards and pay the fees.

    2. I think you're thinking of Soy Sauce Chicken. I find Noodletown's too salty. The best I've had in Manhattan is at Wing Shoon, but they run out later in the day, so if you aren't going for lunch, call ahead to make sure they still have some left. Also, if like me you prefer dark meat, make sure to request it, particularly if you aren't Chinese. Chinese restaurants tend to assume that white people prefer breasts only.

      -----
      Wing Shoon
      165 E Broadway, New York, NY 10002

      2 Replies
      1. re: Pan

        If it's what I'm thinking of, it isn't soy sauce chicken, it's a dish listed on the menu as poached chicken breast with ginger scallion sauce. Haven't tried Noodletown's version.

        -----
        Great New York Noodletown
        28 Bowery, New York, NY 10013

        1. re: squid kun

          I especially liked the rendition at Cantoon Garden.
          It's usually a half chicken (or a whole one if you ask specifically), not just chicken breast. I am not sure if they take credit cards, not very likely.
          This is not exactly Hainan chicken; also soy sauce chicken is a totally different dish.

      2. Actually this is the chicken served in Hainanese chicken rice. Complete with the grated ginger dipping sauce. It's available at Nonya in Chinatown and Taste Good in Elmhurst. I would say Taste Good is MUCH better since they actually serve Singaporean food which is what Hainanese Chicken Rice is.

        The alternate is you can buy the Prima brand package sauce in some chickentown supermarkets for about $7 and make it at home.

        3 Replies
        1. re: kelea

          Are you from Singapore? Because except for Malaysian-Singaporean rivalry, I can't see a reason why anyone would claim that Hainanese Chicken Rice is "really" Singaporean and not Malaysian. It's both, and of course, actually an adaptation of a dish that came from Hainan.

          1. re: Pan

            well they both claim to have "invented" it, but i believe its quite a bit different than wen chang chicken (wen chang is a city in hainan) which is what it is actually called in hainan, there are alot of hainanese in singapore (and malaysia) so thats probably how it got there. i dont really care who invented it, i only care that it is delicious and i wish they had a good version here

            1. re: Lau

              Isn't there also what is sometimes called/labeled in some places Stateside as "scallion chicken" ? There's also the classic white cut chicken (白斬雞 or 白切雞 or some other variants, take your pick)... Hainan chicken rice also implies having the chicken rice and broth, pak cham kai implies just the chicken, the kind of chickens and the cooking stock may vary as well as the sauces but in the end the chickens are very similar in taste and texture nowadays, I think? Here's one article related to the subject: http://www.newsgd.com/english/feature...

              BTW I think "Hainan chicken rice" as known in SE Asia is just as much a Malaysian dish as it is S'porean, as Pan says. IIRC even the Thais have a version - put out by the ethnically Chinese in Thailand etc... :-)