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Is this a tinned copper pan? Opinion requested

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Hi all ...

I am interested in whether my Williams Sonoma France copper pan is tin or steel lined.

The bottom of the pan is rough (possibly indicating melted tin?).

I see some “drops” near the handle that might suggest it was tinned.

Can anyone give me an educated opinon on whether it is tin or steel coated please?

Thanks in advance ...

 
 
 
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  1. Stainless steel lined. You wouldn't see the edges of the rivets so well if it were tinned, plus all Mauviel that I'm aware of that is tin-lined also has copper rivets.

    1. I agree w/ 3G. What's the rim look like? You should be able to see both the copper and the SS there if it's bimetal.

      1. According to Williams Sonoma's website, the only Mauviel pan they carry that is tinned is the one for making pommes Anna. All of the other Mauviel listed is stainless steel lined. However, they also carry Ruffoni, which is all tinned. That said, the photographs of the interior of your pan do not look like anything I would be willing to pay for at any price. I don't think a stainless steel lined copper pan could ever have a bottom looking like that, and if it's tinned, it's damaged, likely from overheating with nothing in it. Can you take it back for an exchange or refund? Even if you bought it at a garage sale, they may be willing to help find a better resolution. Good luck!

        1. WS cracks me up. They don't even know their own inventory. They sell (at least) tin-lined pommes anna pans, pommes vapeurs, stock pots, turbotierres, and soup stations in Mauviel, a variety of Ruffoni, and a cool no name couscoussier. I miss when they were a cooking store.

          1 Reply
          1. re: tim irvine

            tim: You got that right. SLT isn't any better. I couldn't find anyone in either store who knew what a larding needle is. My favorite at W-S is the boxed Tom Keller cake mix and frosting--ONLY $34. Good luck finding an exotic item like a pastry round.

          2. OK ... based on the answers that I have received up to now ...I had better give you all some more information. The pan is older than WSs current line ... so checking the WS site probably won't help (I laready did that) ... I don't think that it is a Mauviel (it isn't marked as such). I guess all pans by WS might be Mauviel ... but it would seem as though they would mark it as such.

            The rivets are copper ... you are looking at the tin/steel side of the rivets.

            If kaleokahu is suggesting that if I can see metal on the inside and copper on the rim ... then it is steel? The rim is also covered with the steel/tin ... So, then it seems like it is tin. I see no copper on the rim.

            I am not concerned about the damage at this time ... I got a good deal on the pan ... especially if it is tinned (which is the purpose of the question).

            2 Replies
            1. re: Aussie_Z

              If the rivets are copper, then it's definitely tinned. However I'm going to go out on a limb here and say that it wasn't tinned "traditionally", but rather by electrolysis of the tin. Traditional melting/wiping of the tin lining fills in the gaps around the edges of the rivets (at least if a decent flux is used), and yours doesn't show that. Plus, now that I look closely at your center picture, I can see a bit of coppery color showing through the tops of the rivets. That speaks for a thin tin lining, which you'd only generally get with electroplated tin (like what they used to do with cans for food way back in the day).

              1. re: Aussie_Z

                Aussie: Yes, I meant that if, at the rim, you can see copper AND another metal, it's a SS-lined pan. If you only see silvery metal and no copper, it's very likely tinned.

                If you want to be sure, you can try scratching a bit of the metal away at the rim (where it won't affect performance/safety).

              2. From the photo the texture looks more "spun" with all pattern horizontal, like SS, than tin, which is generally featureless if done well to gloppy if not.

                3 Replies
                1. re: tim irvine

                  Red Arrow: metallic edge of rim.
                  Yellow arrows: melted lining at edge of pan
                  Blue arrow: copper showing through rivet. Owner says rivets are copper.
                  Black arrow: melted lining at rivet

                  Thus, tinned.
                  Q.E.D.

                   
                  1. re: alarash

                    Alll ... thanks for all the opinions ... I am going to go with Tin lined. Sometime in the future I will consider having it retinned ...

                    Consider this thread closed ... :-)

                    1. re: Aussie_Z

                      Hi, Aussie_Z:

                      I'm with my buddy alarash--99% sure your pan is tin-lined.

                      But before you put this pan into deep storage for some eventual "retinning", I have to ask: How much copper is actually showing through the lining? If it is less than a couple square centimeters, it is fine for cooking.

                      I'm also struck by how (relatively) pristine the lining looks. If the exposed area is within safe limits, I say get in the game and cook with this pan *until* you retin.

                      Kaleo

                2. Are you sure that is Williams Sonoma? That looks suspiciously like the copper pots they sell to tourists at the market at Porte de Clignancourt in Paris. Brass handle, thin, sloppy, and rough tinning. Thin copper.