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Rocky Mountain Oysters. No bull!

Passadumkeg Dec 15, 2010 05:20 PM

I just got done watching Adam Richman eating Rockie Mountain Oysters in Denver, and have seen them on other cooking shows. They are huge. I have been eating them for about 35 years, but they were always from castrated (by moi) calves and were the size of marbles. Surely the flavor must differ from these little pups to the scrotti of the big studs. Has anyone eaten both and can offer a flavor comparison?

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  1. hill food RE: Passadumkeg Dec 15, 2010 05:26 PM

    I've only had the large walnut -size (no pun intended) ones, while I liked 'em I don't know if I'd want to try the larger ones.

    1. Perilagu Khan RE: Passadumkeg Dec 16, 2010 05:05 AM

      Terroir is the key. Size doesn't matter.

      25 Replies
      1. re: Perilagu Khan
        Veggo RE: Perilagu Khan Dec 16, 2010 05:55 AM

        PK: tip of the day - don't put "size doesn't matter" on your facebook page
        Passa - the ones in my hispanic market are from more mature animals, about the size and shape of small Idaho potatoes. A "package" of 3 is a bit over a pound @ $10/lb, surprisingly high for organ meat and for this market.
        Typical cooking process is to slice into 1/4 medallions, drag through a seasoned flour mix, and pan fry. I recall a resto in Colorado that battered and deep fried the medallions. How were they prepared in the program you watched, and how did you cook and serve the 'lil fellas?

        1. re: Veggo
          Passadumkeg RE: Veggo Dec 16, 2010 06:09 AM

          It's not how long ya make it, but how ya make it long, as every good chef knows. Sliced in medallions, floured and deep fried. From the deep recesses of my Stoli soaked brain, I remember that I have partaken of the larger variety, in Bolivia at a churrasco. In true poetic justice, they were served on a platter accompanied by grilled cow's udder. Utterly delicious, gave a rise to my taste buds.
          Here, in NM, the little guys' jewels are simply floured and fried.

          1. re: Passadumkeg
            Perilagu Khan RE: Passadumkeg Dec 16, 2010 06:20 AM

            Soccoro Scallops, they call 'em. Or Albuquerque Abalone. Or Clovis Clams.

            1. re: Passadumkeg
              Veggo RE: Passadumkeg Dec 16, 2010 06:21 AM

              And for those too timid to sample them, "the jewel of denial".

              1. re: Veggo
                Perilagu Khan RE: Veggo Dec 16, 2010 06:22 AM

                Or the Clampett Fambly Jewels.

              2. re: Passadumkeg
                c oliver RE: Passadumkeg Dec 16, 2010 01:40 PM

                I've only ever cooked the small ones when my neighbor castrated his calves. I removed the two membranes, left them whole, floured, sauteed and made a little white wine sauce. Very good.

                1. re: Passadumkeg
                  mucho gordo RE: Passadumkeg Dec 16, 2010 01:51 PM

                  Floured and deep fried is the only way I've ever seen them. Absolutely delicious. Unfortunately I haven't been able to find a restaurant that serves 'em here in So Cal.

                  1. re: mucho gordo
                    Passadumkeg RE: mucho gordo Dec 16, 2010 02:08 PM

                    So Cal? The bulls have tofu ones!

                    1. re: Passadumkeg
                      mucho gordo RE: Passadumkeg Dec 16, 2010 02:46 PM

                      None of that tofu s#$% for me! The real deal or nuthin'.

                      1. re: mucho gordo
                        c oliver RE: mucho gordo Dec 16, 2010 02:50 PM

                        If you deep fry them, I doubt you could tell the difference. RMOs are so mild in flavor. Just sayin'.

                        1. re: c oliver
                          mucho gordo RE: c oliver Dec 16, 2010 02:58 PM

                          True, they are mild but I like to think I'd notice the difference. It's like Crab vs. Krab. can't you tell fake crab from the real stuff? It would be the same thing with the 'oysters'; primarily taste and texture.

                          1. re: mucho gordo
                            c oliver RE: mucho gordo Dec 16, 2010 03:01 PM

                            Yeah, I was exaggerating a smidge. I just wouldn't deep fry them.

                            1. re: c oliver
                              mucho gordo RE: c oliver Dec 16, 2010 03:34 PM

                              May I ask why?

                              1. re: mucho gordo
                                c oliver RE: mucho gordo Dec 16, 2010 03:59 PM

                                Both the texture and the flavor are such that I think deep frying would overwhelm both. And having prepared them a couple of times "fresh" from the animal, they were quite a bit of work. I'd cook them in a minimal way (that's not a good word but can't think of what I'd substitute).

                                1. re: c oliver
                                  Passadumkeg RE: c oliver Dec 16, 2010 04:27 PM

                                  What a tease!

                                  1. re: Passadumkeg
                                    Veggo RE: Passadumkeg Dec 16, 2010 04:38 PM

                                    nevermind

                                  2. re: c oliver
                                    mucho gordo RE: c oliver Dec 17, 2010 09:40 AM

                                    The ones I had were deep fried, but lightly; they were not crisp on the outside. If you didn't know better, you'd think you were eating McNuggets. The delicate flavor was there and the texture smooth, not chewy. The restaurant that served them is located in an area where cattle ranches proliferate and the people had the knowhow to prepare them properly.

                                    1. re: mucho gordo
                                      c oliver RE: mucho gordo Dec 17, 2010 10:12 AM

                                      Sounds great. I've only done them floured and pan "fried"/sauteed and then a wine sauce. I miss having my rancher neighbors.

                                      1. re: c oliver
                                        mucho gordo RE: c oliver Dec 17, 2010 10:16 AM

                                        Wine sauce sounds great. Mine had no sauce at all, but they weren't dry.

                            2. re: c oliver
                              mamachef RE: c oliver Dec 18, 2010 02:40 PM

                              The spunky little small guys (no pun intended) had the flavor and texture of a very fine veal liver, whereas the pendulous baseball-sized spheres were flops at my table. More like a veiny, old cow's liver.

                              1. re: mamachef
                                Passadumkeg RE: mamachef Dec 18, 2010 02:55 PM

                                Yup, my opinion, xactly.

                                1. re: mamachef
                                  c oliver RE: mamachef Dec 18, 2010 03:11 PM

                                  What I can't figure out is why many of the big uns are even available in any quantity. Why would a rancher NOT castrate all his male calves?

                                  1. re: c oliver
                                    Passadumkeg RE: c oliver Dec 18, 2010 03:38 PM

                                    Incentive. Ranchers want aggressive rodeo bulls.

                                    1. re: Passadumkeg
                                      c oliver RE: Passadumkeg Dec 18, 2010 03:46 PM

                                      Hard to believe there are enough (dead) post-rodeo bulls to create a market but that makes sense. Maybe those are the ones who didn't make the cut :)

                                    2. re: c oliver
                                      e
                                      Eldon Kreider RE: c oliver Dec 19, 2010 03:20 PM

                                      Don't forget about former breeding bulls. Granted that the supply has been drastically reduced by the almost universal use of artificial insemination for dairy cows.

                                      Bull meat used to be very cheap and was widely used in strong-flavored sausages, hence the category baloney bulls. The Vienna all-beef hot dogs that are so popular in Chicago get some of their distinctive flavor from a fair fraction of bull meat. They formerly used bull meat exclusively but have not been able to get enough for some years and now use less than half bull meat.

                                      One large Hispanic market near me consistently has bull-sized testicles for sale. They also have beef penises, but they could come from steers.

                    2. tracylee RE: Passadumkeg Dec 16, 2010 07:43 PM

                      The Buckhorn Exchange Restaurant is where they're served in Denver. It's very near the light rail tracks that we used to take to my sister's place. We've never gotten around to eating there, and she moved to a different part of town this last year.

                      3 Replies
                      1. re: tracylee
                        Passadumkeg RE: tracylee Dec 16, 2010 07:46 PM

                        That's where I saw 'em on M vs F.

                        1. re: Passadumkeg
                          tracylee RE: Passadumkeg Dec 16, 2010 07:51 PM

                          I thought so... I've watched most of the re-runs of M vs F on Netflix.

                          Here in Oregon, we always referred to Sheep "parts" as Rocky Mountain Oysters. Not that I've tried them from either animal.

                          1. re: tracylee
                            Veggo RE: tracylee Dec 16, 2010 08:07 PM

                            They are available in a few places around the front range, but the Buckhorn Exchange is sort of special, with unusual game meat, wall decor, and the first liquor license issued in Colorado. Excellent elk and quail combo, and piano on the mezzanine.

                      2. FoodFuser RE: Passadumkeg Dec 16, 2010 08:34 PM

                        I've had them in restaurants just a few times, but never have cooked them at home.

                        I'd think that since cowboys snip those spheres the first year,
                        the diameter would be rather small on those balls.

                        But I will admit I'm a mere incognoscenti when it comes to the cut and the fry of the scroti.

                        1. justanotherpenguin RE: Passadumkeg Dec 17, 2010 07:28 AM

                          haven't had them, but know where you can get them:

                          http://www.exoticmeatmarket.com/index...

                          11 Replies
                          1. re: justanotherpenguin
                            d
                            Dirty Ernie RE: justanotherpenguin Dec 17, 2010 09:57 AM

                            justan...

                            That 's a ridculously very cool site. Was that Tony- the-Tiger in the lead spot on the menu? Hate to think that I would be chewing on his package!

                            1. re: justanotherpenguin
                              Passadumkeg RE: justanotherpenguin Dec 17, 2010 03:46 PM

                              Thanks, I know I can get them locally, if I only ask.

                              1. re: Passadumkeg
                                mamachef RE: Passadumkeg Dec 18, 2010 02:52 PM

                                Well Pdk, if you ever decide to only ask, I have a friend who slices, then pickles them in leftover jalapeno brine, dredges them in egg wash and chile-spiked cornmeal/flour (1:1) and fries happily away. He generally serves 'em up with a sour-cream and horseradish dip. I only ever heard about them for years because they were a staple at his poker nights to which I was uninvited, but then I beat him in an unrelated game of Texas Hold 'em and instead of the boring old money he wanted to give me, I wangled an invite to the game and came away with this recipe, and is it ever good.

                                1. re: mamachef
                                  Passadumkeg RE: mamachef Dec 18, 2010 02:56 PM

                                  Yum!

                                  1. re: Passadumkeg
                                    mamachef RE: Passadumkeg Dec 18, 2010 03:04 PM

                                    And that's no bulls****

                                  2. re: mamachef
                                    o
                                    ospreycove RE: mamachef Dec 18, 2010 03:42 PM

                                    MamaChef, Your recipe sounds great....It is in my "to try" file!!!

                                    1. re: ospreycove
                                      Veggo RE: ospreycove Dec 18, 2010 04:23 PM

                                      ospreycove, you can buy them fresh at the Bravo market in Bradenton, unless you have a closer source.

                                      1. re: Veggo
                                        o
                                        ospreycove RE: Veggo Dec 18, 2010 04:29 PM

                                        Veggo,
                                        Bravo is a great Hispanic Supermarket, as you must know; we shop there almost every other week. It is the closest place that carries Goat meat in the butcher shop.
                                        Thanks for the info.

                                        1. re: ospreycove
                                          Veggo RE: ospreycove Dec 18, 2010 04:40 PM

                                          Acapulco Tropical also carries goat. Frozen, but they have a band saw so you don't have to buy a whole leg. I have them do 2 inch cubes that are good for braising and then Jamaican curry.

                                          1. re: Veggo
                                            o
                                            ospreycove RE: Veggo Dec 18, 2010 04:52 PM

                                            Thanks, I know where Acapulco Tropicale is, and it always looks busy based on the # of cars. I have not been there I guess it is time to check it out!!

                                            1. re: ospreycove
                                              Veggo RE: ospreycove Dec 18, 2010 05:05 PM

                                              That's where I get my chicharron delgado the size of a ladies hat. Their rotisserie chickens come with 1/2 kilo of just-made warm tortillas, but the chickens are smaller than they used to be. They have frozen quail and octopus and their produce is less expensive than the "gringo" markets. They have an eat-in section but it doesn't ring my bell. Overall, worth checking out.

                              2. horseshoe RE: Passadumkeg Dec 18, 2010 01:43 PM

                                I can get them 3 to a package for about 3 bucks. They are about the size of a medium potato. Skin them, cut into 1/4 in. slices dredge in flour then buttermilk the flour again. Cream gravy on the side..Hispanic markets will sometimes have them. The regular stores don't.

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