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Help with Pairing

dcole Dec 12, 2010 04:47 PM

I am going to be serving a lasagna bolognese (using spinach noodles and a bechemel) and another lasagna with shitakes and blueberries with a white truffle oil-parmesan reggiano fondue. I'm not great at pairing, but was thinking of serving a red burgundy. Does that sound like it would go with both? Im thinking some earthiness would complement the mushrooms/truffle oil yet still work with the bolongese. Any other suggestions? Thanks!

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  1. b
    Brad Ballinger RE: dcole Dec 13, 2010 09:39 AM

    Nebbiolo for mushrooms and truffles. So Barolo, Barbaresco. Gattinara if you want to spend less money. Valtellina (from the Lombardy region - same grape going by a different name there), if you also want to spend less. And that wine will also go well enough with the other.

    3 Replies
    1. re: Brad Ballinger
      ChefJune RE: Brad Ballinger Dec 13, 2010 10:08 AM

      I would be looking for a less expensive Nebbiolo. Somehow Barolo and Barbaresco seem like lily-gilding with lasagna. Plus, both are quite pricy. Brad made some good suggestions, and I have also found some generic Nebbiolos from the Langhe that are good qpr's and would be a good accompaniment to both lasagne.

      As far as non-Italian wines go, Cahors is a better pairing for truffles than Burgundy.

      1. re: ChefJune
        dcole RE: ChefJune Dec 13, 2010 11:53 AM

        Thank you guys very much! Appreciate the help.

        1. re: dcole
          invinotheresverde RE: dcole Dec 15, 2010 06:31 AM

          Travaglini makes a Gattinara that's delicious and probably around $30 retail. Look for the 04, if you can find it.

    2. s
      sillysully RE: dcole Dec 13, 2010 05:55 PM

      Can you tell me where you got your recipes - they sound delicious!!!

      1 Reply
      1. re: sillysully
        dcole RE: sillysully Dec 14, 2010 04:34 PM

        Of course. The first is Marco Canora's Lasagna Verde, which was pretty infamous in NYC for a while...if you do a google search, you will find a recipe for it on the internet somewhere, but I do recomend the book it came from - Salt to Taste by Marco Canora (obviously).
        The second is a take on Marc Vetri's Porcini & Blueberry Lasagna. As I won't be able to find fresh Porcinis I am subbing Shitakes - not sure if I like the idea of dried in the application. He makes a white truffle fondue to serve with it. I got this from his book Il Viaggio di Vetri, which is one of my favorite cookbooks. I have found that to be one of the most useful cookbooks I have, as everything in it is very creative and somewhat easy to recreate. It's also a fun book to flip through. Whenever I talk about it, I feel like a salesmen, sorry about that :)

      2. r
        ReeseChiarlo RE: dcole Dec 14, 2010 05:51 PM

        I 2nd the choice of inexpensive Nebbiolo, and Cahor is also a great suggestion with the truffle oil and shitakes. Though the blueberries throw me off just a bit with pairing idea. Can you tell me more about the flavor profile that the berries add, is it overpowered by the truffle oil and parmesan raggiano, or does the flavor standout?

        2 Replies
        1. re: ReeseChiarlo
          z
          zamorski RE: ReeseChiarlo Dec 14, 2010 07:05 PM

          L.A. Cetto from the Guadalupe Valley in Mexico produces a nice, affordable Nebbiolo. Who knew? Not a Barolo, of course, but it still has some of the odd, earthy flavours of the varietal.

          1. re: ReeseChiarlo
            dcole RE: ReeseChiarlo Dec 15, 2010 08:05 AM

            The main aspect of the dish are the shitake/parm-regg/truffle oil. The blueberries will add more of a burst of acidity/sweetness every few bites to break up the earthiness of the rest of the dish. The blueberries are much more of a background note to the rest of the earthy flavors.

            A nebbiolo excites me in this case for 2 reasons, first I have not really given Italian wines the time (which still isn't that much, I am not close to a wine expert) I have to Spanish, California/Oregon, and French wines. I would say I have even given Argentinian wines more due than Italian. So being that I should give them their due, and the dishes are Italian, an Italian wine makes sense.

            With what I described on the blueberries, Nebbiolo still sound like the right choice?

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