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Other uses for Wasabi than sushi?

I hate sushi and all seafood. But I love Wasabi.
It´s so uniquely sharp in its flavor, like a gourmet mustard with more depth. So I wonder what else you can use it to?

I have both paste and powder Wasabi, but the only thing I ever used it on, was a sandwich with smoked ham. But are there perhaps some genius recipes with Wasabi for poultry or meat I don´t know about?

Any japanese yakitori that you can treat with wasabi perhaps?

I want to learn more ways to use this. As I sit here writing, I´m eating my favourite nuts - wasabi nuts.

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  1. I've had Wasabi chips (soooo delicious). I'm sure it could be made into a dip and use regular chips.

      1. Can't seem to find a bottled horseradish hot enough, so I mix wasabi with sour cream to use on prime rib or any roast beef.

        5 Replies
        1. re: Gail

          I do a wasabi mayonnaise for roast beef sandwiches. Just a good tbs. mixed in for the real effect. It does hellishy good things to them.

          1. re: mamachef

            Excellent, I'm on it! I usually do a dijon mustard/mayo combo for beef sandwiches.

            1. re: mamachef

              Since our commercial wasabi is really horseradish powder and mustard it would work great with roast beef. I also make a wasabi mayo. Usually layering it between layers of sushi rice as a side for sashimi. I also use this wasabi mayo to coat fish before coating in panko or sesame seeds.

            2. re: Gail

              I love horseradish (see recent "favorite condiments" thread) on roast beef. I know Wasabi is a horseradish, but I never put the two together in my head. So when you mix it with sour cream or mayo, it comes out a Dollar-Bill-green color?

              1. re: GraydonCarter

                Yes, if the slight green color bothers you, don't use it. I am not bothered by it because in Paris I had a delightful lunch of sliced room temp chicken with chive infused mayo which was slightly green and so delicious. I guess if an up-scale French restaurant could do it, what the heck?

            3. Add to creme fraiche and pair it with fresh berries, cobblers and puddings, or in trifles.

              Use it as a spice rub for lamb chops (or shank).

              Incorporate it into your vinagrette when making salad dressing.

              Combine with soy sauce, some chili flakes, sesame oil, rice wine vinegar and sugar, and drizzle it over tofu. Serve chilled and garnished with toasted sesame seeds and chopped parsley (optional).

              Add it to salsa, either pico de gallo or salsa verde