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Replicating Roast's roasted brussel sprouts

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First time Chow poster but longtime fan. I'm writing because I need advice on replicating the delicious roasted brussel sprouts served at Michael Symon's Roast in Detroit. I'd like to make them for Thanksgiving but don't know the recipe and haven't been able to obtain it.

Their recipe contains an oil, vinegar (was told sherry by a waiter but others who like it say it's balsamic), onions and walnuts. I'm thinking I would start them on the stovetop, then finish them in the oven. I'm not sure about how much oil to use (theirs are very greasy) or when to add the vinegar and walnuts (I presume the onions can go in together with the sprouts??). Any one have any ideas on how to make this?

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  1. Having never tasted the dish... You can toast the walnuts separately in the same oven. Sherry vinegar goes on at the end.

    1. according to Roast's online menu, they're fried, not roasted. my guess is that this recipe is close...

      http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/fr...

      1. Thanks..but now I'm conflicted because I really don't want to deal with deep-frying on Thanksgiving. Do you think roasting will give them a similar flavor? If I coat the bottom of a skillet in a good amount of oil and be sure to turn them once or twice I'm thinking they'll develop a similar crust.

        3 Replies
        1. re: berkleygirl

          you can definitely roast them & get a crispy exterior texture and deep flavor...i do it all the time. try starting the oven at 450, and if they're getting too charred, reduce the heat to 400.

          1. re: berkleygirl

            These sound fabulous and I think either shallow-frying or roasting will give you great results. Thanks for calling attention to this, and thanks GHG for hunting down the link!

            1. re: biondanonima

              Oh they are to die for, you have no idea! I wish I could eat them everyday and I only hope I can get similar results without deep frying.

              Thanks everyone so much for all the advice!

          2. These sound very similar to the brussels sprouts served at Pizzeria Mozza here in LA; here's the recipe:

            http://www.signonsandiego.com/uniontr...

            I absolutely love them in the restaurant, but have never tried replicating them at home because of all the fat. They sure are good though...

            1. You could try this method, which gives a crisp exterior without true frying. I sometimes use sherry vinegar, sometimes balsamic. This recipe has no onions, but I'm sure they could be incorporated into the dish.

              Trim brussels sprouts, removing outer leaves. Make a small X in the base of each sprout, Steam the sprouts in a steamer basket inserted into a pot until they are crisp-tender, and remove them from heat. Remove basket and pour remaining water out of pot. In (same) pot melt butter and olive oil over medium high heat. Remove sprouts from basket and return to pot and saute them until the outer leaves are well-browned. Add vinegar to pot (about 1 T per lb. of sprouts)--it will sizzle and hiss--and shake or rotate pan to coat the sprouts. Cook until most moisture has evaporated and they are glazed. Before serving, salt and pepper to taste and sprinkle w/chopped, toasted walnuts.

              1. I made the Food Network recipe for Michael's deep fried brussel sprouts, but instead of deep frying, I mixed ingredients together and roasted on high heat in the oven. I regularly roast vegetables using balsamic vinegar liberally and just a little olive oil, to cut down on fat, and to carmelize. These brussel sprouts done this way were FABULOUS. My husband is not a fan of brussel sprouts, but he has already put in a request to have these again at Thanksgiving. They did blacken a bit, but most times roasted veggies do, and it did not affect flavor. If they darken too quickly, adjust heat. I roasted them starting at 450 and adjusted from there. They are absolutely delicious. Enjoy!

                1 Reply
                1. re: 5busyrussells

                  ahh, so as we suspected, high-heat roasting is a fine alternative to frying for this recipe. awesome! thanks for the report :)