HOME > Chowhound > Greater Boston Area >

Discussion

Khao Soi in Boston?

I just got back from the Twin Cities, MN, where I had some great Thai food - including khao soi. I'm wondering where in Boston I can try this dish....

I have read that Khao Sarn in Brookline has it. Any specific reports about this?

I don't see it on S&I's menu, but perhaps they can make it anyway? Although I suppose it takes a while to prepare, since it involves stewed chicken....do they ever have it as a special?

The dish is of Burmese origins, (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khao_soi) so it definitely has something in common with the Chicken/Coconut Noodle Soup served at YoMa, which I still haven't tried....

Thanks in advance,

Dave MP

-----
Khao Sarn
250 Harvard St, Brookline, MA 02446

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
  1. Rod Dee (now in Washington square Brookline) has Khao Soi but I don't remember having tried it there (although it has been one of my favorite dishes, elsewhere). I don't think Montien has it. I usually have to wear a plastic bib so that the curry broth coming off the two types of noodles doesn't splatter all over my shirt ;)

    1. Khao Sarn does indeed have it; I like it, though like many dishes on its menu, it's probably more refined and offers less pungent/insinuating flavors that you might expect. I have not been back to Brown Sugar Cafe or The Similans lately, but both used to have it on their menus. The dish you want at YoMa is OhnNohKhotSwe, which is described as a soup.

      http://mcslimjb.blogspot.com/

      -----
      The Similans
      145 1st St, Cambridge, MA 02142

      Khao Sarn
      250 Harvard St, Brookline, MA 02446

      Brown Sugar Cafe
      1033 Commonwealth Ave, Boston, MA 02215

      1. Khao Sarn would be your best bet, IMHO, but Tamarind House, the surprisingly good (for mostly Americanized Thai) restaurant right near Porter Square also has it on their menu.

        -----
        Khao Sarn
        250 Harvard St, Brookline, MA 02446

        Tamarind House
        1790 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02140

        2 Replies
        1. re: lipoff

          Tamarind House, love it, their Pad Kee Mao is good, it used to be a bit better when they had the cherry sized eggplants in it. Their Yum Talay is my favorite SE asian summer dish, also the owner's favorite. Even the quality of the tea is good. Prik Pon is my magic fairy pixy dust as of late.

          The owner is from a town famous for Tamarind crops. She's great!

          -----
          Tamarind House
          1790 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02140

          1. re: tatsu

            Whew, I can come out of the kitchen closet and confess that I eat at Tamarind House from time to time, too.

            -----
            Tamarind House
            1790 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02140

        2. Maybe I am missing something, but why get a Burmese dish at a Thai restaurant when we are lucky enough to have a very good Burmese restaurant in Boston? MC Slim JB is correct, OhnNohKhotSwe is the Burmese name for the dish as it appears on Yo Ma's menu.

          9 Replies
          1. re: qianning

            For the same reason you'd get a laksa at a Malaysian restaurant.

            1. re: qianning

              Because it's not the same dish. It's a Thai dish that developed from OhnNohKhotSwe, but it seems to have gone off in its own direction.

              1. re: qianning

                Like Allstonian said, they are not really the same dish, though the dishes probably share similar origins.

                Here's a thread from the SF board where this dish is discussed a bit more:
                http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/447845

                And here's a link to the Wikipedia article which explains the different types of khao soi. The version I had in St. Paul last weekend was exactly like the "Thai" version described in this article.

                http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khao_soi

                1. re: qianning

                  Yep, there is a difference in the two interpretations of this dish. I've had the great opportunity to have both the Burmese and Thai versions in the respective countries - both delicious and different (same same but different). I haven't had Yoma's OhnNohKhotSwe yet (still...grrr) but I've yet to find really good Khao Soi in Boston. We head to SE Asia again in two weeks...I'll be revved up to find any comparable dishes Stateside so I'll try to do some research once we're home.

                  1. re: digga

                    I stand corrected, my memory was that they were pretty much the same dish, but this thread sent me looking through all my Thai & Burmese cookbooks, and indeed the Thai versions all include some form/amount of soy sauce (which really surprised me) and some form/amount of sugar (which doesn't surprise me), where as Burmese versions never use either of these ingredients but always include besan flour as a thickener, which none of the Thai recipes use.

                    I've never had Khao Soi at any restaurant in Boston, but I have had the OhnNohKhotSwe at Yo Ma, and it is pretty good, but not my favorite dish from their menu by a long shot.

                    1. re: qianning

                      What Burmese cookbooks do you recommend?

                        1. re: FoodDabbler

                          "The Food of Burma" in the Periplus series is excellent in that the recipes come true, although the overall number of recipes is limited. Also, "Burmese Cooking" by Aung Aung Taik, and "Flavors of Burma" by Chan.

                  2. i'm a HUGE fan of Khao Soi. My favorite is at Brown Sugar Cafe. I also like the one at Khao Sarn. In the Super 88 Food Court in Brighton, Packard's Corner, the stand behind Wisteria makes a Malaysan soup which is v. much like Khao Soi.

                    6 Replies
                    1. re: CookieLee

                      I think you may be working on outdated information: there is no longer a Malaysian stall behind Wisteria, and there hasn't been for ages. (Heck, Wisteria itself has been closed for months! And for that matter, all this is in Allston, not Brighton.) That space is now a Thai restaurant called Smile Thai. I make no claims about their khao soi, because I usually get either the larb or the country-style pad thai.

                      1. re: Jenny Ondioline

                        oh dear, thanks for the update. I'll have to mosey on over there and see what's happenin'.

                        Lam's in Newtonville also has Khao Soi.

                        1. re: Jenny Ondioline

                          The place behind Wisteria is still there.

                          1. re: CookieLee

                            By "the place behind Wisteria," if you mean the Thai restaurant called Smile Thai, then yes. It had seemed like you were talking about the Malaysian place that Smile Thai replaced.

                            1. re: Jenny Ondioline

                              I thought that the spot was Indonesian, not Malaysian.

                              1. re: nasilemak

                                Now that you mention it, there were two short-lived restaurants in there in quick succession before Smile Thai moved in, and it's possible that one of them was Malaysian and one of them was Indonesian, or that they were both one or the other. But whatever they were, they've been gone for ages.