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Where to get (tasty) roasted suckling pig?

Where can I buy (tasty) roasted suckling pig? I live in Palo Alto but often visit Oakland/Alameda. I know fancy Cantonese restaurants like Koi Palace offer the dish, but I don't feel like paying $15-20 for a small plate at a sit-down restaurant. Looking for a Cantonese deli where I can buy a serving or two, i.e., not an entire pig for a wedding.

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Koi Palace Restaurant
365 Gellert Blvd, Daly City, CA 94015

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  1. How much does a whole little sucker weigh? How much is waste?

    1 Reply
    1. re: wolfe

      Koi Palace serves a whole suckling pig as a first dish (for a large table of say 10-12) for $190. I bet they remove the bulk of the pig before serving though.

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      Koi Palace Restaurant
      365 Gellert Blvd, Daly City, CA 94015

    2. Cafe 88 in Oakland has very good roast suckling pig.

      1. Oakland Chinatown look for bbq places with ducks hanging in the window, they will also have a roast pig hanging. You can buy roast pig for about $7-$8 a pound, they will cut to order.

        A suckling pig is a pig that weighs no more than 25 pounds (see picture). That whole pig you see in the picture sells for about $150.

         
        2 Replies
        1. re: monku

          I was actually eating at Cafe 88 just a few days. Great Happy Hour prices (wonderful and certainly not skimpy-portion roast duck with overcooked lai fun soup noodles for just three bucks, same price for rice sticks in soup with ling fish paste). I don't think they had suckling pig, but I'm not sure. Their $14 yellow feather chicken was quite good.

          I do know many of these Cantonese deli places sell roast pork from a mature pig. The skin is too thick, plus you get a way more robust flavor in the meat than a suckling pig (nothing wrong, just different). I am wondering if there are Cantonese deli places that sell a serving or two of meat from a suckling pig for enjoyment by one person, i.e., myself. ;-p

          1. re: vincentlo

            Ah, missed the size difference.

            I've always enjoyed the skin on the Cafe 88 roast pig - maybe too much for my own good - it's cooked more skillfully than at other places, so it's usually really crisp. Worth a shot, if the suckling pig search comes up short.

        2. Cheung Hing in Millbrae has suckling pig on either Saturday or Sunday. I haven't had it, but I like the regular roast pig here. I hear it sells out very fast.

          http://www.chow.com/digest/4467/and-t...

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          Cheung Hing Restaurant
          245 El Camino Real, Millbrae, CA 94030

          1 Reply
          1. re: Melanie Wong

            I've never seen cheap suckling pig. A little plate is usually $15 to $20. I've seen it at Asian Pearl and Hong Kong East Ocean (the one in Emeryville). ABC in Milpitas also serves it as dim sum dish ($20).
            Fremont Asian Pearl - 43635 Boscell Rd Fremont, CA

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            Asian Pearl
            3288 Pierce St, Richmond, CA 94804

          2. I couldn't help but to post this picture.
            Yesterday in LA eating at Sam Woo BBQ there was this gorgeous suckling pig waiting to be picked up...I had to restrain myself from taking a piece.
            Waiter said it weighed in at a little over 30 pounds cooked and sold for about $185...figure a little over $6/pound.

             
            1 Reply
            1. re: monku

              Yes, that sounds about right. We had one about that weight and price for Christmas dinner. I've only ever seen mature pigs at Chinese delis - I'll have to be on the lookout.

            2. Yee's Restaurant in SF Chinatown often has a little pig hanging next to the regular roast pig. There was one on Friday when I stopped in. I didn't buy any because the cut was on the rib section and I didn't want that much bone at $12 per lb.

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              Yee's Restaurant
              1131 Grant Ave, San Francisco, CA 94133

              1. It used to be that roast suckling pig was available on weekends going south to Milpitas and north to Millbrae. The Milpitas place I used to go to has since stopped and availability at the place up north, Cheung Hing, has lately become hard to predict. At Cheung Hing, there is the ever present little sign in Chinese placed in the back corner of the deli advertising suckling pig. I was told that it was available on Saturdays and Sundays. However, on a recent Saturday morning, when I made an impromptu stop on my way back after dropping someone off at SFO, they did not have it! I would hereafter always call Cheung Hing ahead of time before making a special trip up there. The last time I got the roast suckling pig last at Cheung high was on a Saturday morning and it was some time ago (~ a year or two ago). It used to come out of the roaster between ten and ten thirty and sold rapidly. Though I was there first, a pushy lady (?) squeezed ahead of me; fortunately, she took two pounds only off the rib section. That left me free to pounce on the whole, boneless neck/shoulder piece that I wanted (I always chop up roast pork at home).

                One can always do your own roast pork at home. Some love crispy skin best and just doing that alone.

                Following photos show:

                1. Cheung Hing suckling pig, neck-shoulder piece, $15 at $12 per lb
                2. Cheung Hing sucking pig, cut up
                3. Koi Palace suckling pig serving, $18
                4. Koi Palace whole suckling pig, $190
                5. Roast pork belly, 2 lbs, ~ $5
                6. Roast pork belly, cut up
                7. Pork skin, $.50 per lb
                8. Roast pork skin

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                Koi Palace Restaurant
                365 Gellert Blvd, Daly City, CA 94015

                Cheung Hing Restaurant
                245 El Camino Real, Millbrae, CA 94030

                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                3 Replies
                1. re: CYL

                  Following CYL's lead, I have 3 pictures of roast pig, along with two chickens. I attended the Inaugural March of Oakland Mayor Jean Quan from Oakland Chinatown to the Fox theater this morning. We started with a ceremony of a drum and two dragons which serenaded the Mayor-elect, and this was on the table at the Loong Kong Tien Yee Assocation (henceforth Family Association), directly across from the Pacific Rennaissance Plaza in Oakland Chinatown. Jean's great-grandfather took refuge above the family association in Oakland shortly after the 1906 San Francisco earthquake.

                  whole roast pig, uncut
                  http://www.flickr.com/photos/15742375...

                  rear view, note the two chickens in the background
                  http://www.flickr.com/photos/15742375...

                  roast pig and two chickens
                  http://www.flickr.com/photos/15742375...

                  I didn't have a chance to ask where the food came from.

                  1. re: CYL

                    CYL,

                    What is your recipe for the pork skin?

                    1. re: Spireup

                      Unfortunately CYL passed away in February 2013....

                  2. Koi Palace continues to be the gold standard for roast suckling pig.

                    But, last month I had dim sum at Imperial Garden Seafood on San Bruno Ave. for the first time in eons and was impressed by its version of suckling pig. No idea how much it costs, not included on the BBQ menu.

                    http://www.newimperialgarden.com/

                     
                    6 Replies
                    1. re: Melanie Wong

                      Move away Koi Palace, because we have a new kid on the block that blows you away for roast suckling pig! The name is the new Tai Wu in Millbrae. The preparation was stunning, as good as a textbook version in Hong Kong and Guangzhou, with skin as thin and crispy as one can imagine. The manager/supervisor taking care of our order suggested a combination platter of that with roast pork belly, and the whole dish was just heavenly. Unfortunately I didn't know the price, since I was the youngest at the table (and so didn't have to pay, or should I say fortunately). Repeat: The preparation was stunning. It really was that good. Forget Cheung Hing or Koi Palace or anywhere else.

                      1. re: vincentlo

                        Thanks for the post. Great timing! Headed back that way tomorrow. Read the reviews on the restaurant and they are all over the place! Difficult to tell if one will have a good experience.

                        Do you know how long it took? Was the order made ahead of time? Or did your party order when you walked in? Is it on the menu?

                        Lastly, what is the phonetic pronunciation in Cantonese please?
                        "Kao Ru Zhu" or "Kyu Zyu"?

                        Roast Suckling Pig = 烤乳猪 = Correct?

                        1. re: Spireup

                          Pronounced "yue jue". The vowel is like the first syllable of French "oeuvre" for both words.

                          1. re: Spireup

                            I think the suckling pig is always roasted in Cantonese cuisine, and so you probably don't need to specify the "roast" part. We just placed the order when we were at the restaurant, but I'm sure it won't hurt to call in advance for a reservation of the dish. Perhaps do what we did: Combine that with roast pork belly for contrast. Like Zen Peninsula, they specialize in live seafood, and I really enjoyed the large Australian lobster (two ways: first sauteed expertly with egg white, and head in soup), which I'm guessing they sold at $40-45 a pound or so judging from my peep at the final tab ($300 for 5 out the door--I brought the wine and they only charge corkage per table not per bottle). I just looked at their takeout menu, and their suckling pig platter goes for $18.50--should be about the same as Koi Palace's.

                        2. re: Melanie Wong

                          Do you have any other recommendations at Imperial Garden? I live in the Portola and have been there once. I was not impressed. We usually get up early(we have small children) and get to Koi Palace right when they open so we don't have to wait. And it's only 10 minutes from home! But I'd love to just walk to dim sum sometime.

                          1. re: srr

                            Imperial Garden is the kind of spot that one describes with a qualifier---good for the price. Our lunch came to less than $10 per person. But other than the suckling pig, nothing that I can recall as notable at this point in time. A lot of tables ordered the lobster noodles, so perhaps that's something to try. A friend in the neighborhood said it changed hands since I was last there a decade ago and the quality is higher now.

                        3. Guandong Barbecue Tea House on Irving St in SF sometimes has roast suckling pig, in addition to the regular market size pig. I tried it three weeks ago and was pleased with it. Very thin bubbly skin and smooth, succulent meat with little visible fat. Take-out cannot compare to having it freshly roasted at a top notch dim sum place, but this was satisfying and worth the tariff.

                          https://plus.google.com/1129282501070...