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Mango Muffin experiments

I love mangos and my son has a bunch of mango pulp in the pantry that's just been sitting around.

So today I thought I'd try some mango muffins. It's not a very common thing to find a recipe for, however. I finally found a recipe that used the pulp instead of the whole fruit, but it looked way too wet.

This is what I tried:

1c mango pulp
2 eggs
1/4c oil
1/4c sugar (cut from 1 c)
1c milk
1 T baking powder
2 c flour
1/2 tsp salt

I INTENDED to cut the milk to 1/2c but forgot and put in the whole cup instead. Sure enough it made a very wet batter. I also intended to use 1/2c sugar but for some reason used 1/4c instead - probably I cut it by half in my head, and then while measuring, cut THAT in half again.

Baked in a 350 oven for 30 minutes.

Sure enough, that batter was way too wet. The muffins taste ok - I was worried I had cut the sugar by too much, but now I'm sure that 1 c of sugar would have been WAY too much. 1/2c would probably be alright, but 1/4c is fine. I don't have much of a sweet tooth so YMMV.

The problem is the texture is all wrong. I can't describe it really - the batter was very fluffy and full of holes. Possibly because it was too wet? CUPCAKES don't come out like this. I used paper cups and the paper peels away taking a significant portion of muffin with it. They taste ok, but the texture spoils it.

I'm debating trying again with half the milk as I originally intended, or just leaving the milk out altogether, maybe increasing the mango pulp to 1.5 c.

Any thoughts or suggestions?

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  1. Yeah, sounds like the batter was too wet! I would look for recipes that use apple sauce, and substitute the mango pulp. I imagine apple sauce and mango pulp would be roughly the same texture and sweetness. Though you may want to adjust spices. Good luck!

    3 Replies
    1. re: visciole

      Oooh, good idea, I hadn't thought of that!

      1. re: ZenSojourner

        Maybe it might even be similar in texture/sweetness to mashed banana? In which case you could try banana bread recipes.

        With mango pulp I'd think of using ginger or maybe a touch of almond extract. Mango muffins sound yummy -- maybe I'll have to go make my own experiment now!

        1. re: visciole

          No, it's more like - well the closest I can think of is the Campbells Cheese Soup my dad used to love. It's a thick smooth puree like that, maybe a little bit thicker. I think the applesauce idea was pretty spot on.

          I should be baking up another batch tomorrow, or maybe Sunday. We'll see what happens.

    2. i have a terrific recipe, unfortunately it's on my computer back home and i'm out of town. i'm sure you'll get plenty of feedback before then, but when i get back in a few days i'll post it for you if you want...just let me know!

      in the meantime, the problem with your experiment is the ratio of dry to wet ingredients. muffins are typically 2:1 flour to liquid (not including eggs or oil)...so your instinct about changes to make for the next try was correct in terms of the milk, but i have another suggestion for tweaking it....

      - lose the milk altogether and use 1/2 cup of buttermilk or yogurt instead
      - increase the flour by 1/2 cup
      - use 1/4 cup plus 2 T sugar
      - keep everything else the same

      oh, and those "holes" were air tunnels from over-mixing. use as few strokes as needed just to combine all the ingredients. never *beat* muffin batter.

      2 Replies
      1. re: goodhealthgourmet

        Yes, I did inadvertently do that (overbeat)! While I was folding in the flour, I was thinking to myself, "Now, do I beat the heck out of this, or is this like biscuits and cookie dough and I just barely mix?" While I was thinking that it got to be too late, LOL!

        Yes, do send on your recipe when you get home, if it's not too much trouble. I like to compare recipes and fiddle around with them, I get ideas from different recipes for things to try.

        Oh yeah, and I forgot, I also put in 1 T of vanilla in my recipe.

        1. re: ZenSojourner

          yep. i figured i had you on the over-mixing, it's always the culprit with tunneling ;)

          just so you know, i suggested yogurt or buttermilk for 2 reasons - to add a bit of tang to the flavor, and because the extra acid (on top of what's already in the baking powder) helps keep the crumb tender and adds a little lift. you can always sour your own milk by adding a little lemon juice or apple cider vinegar and letting it sit for a few minutes.

          i'll be sure to post my recipe for you when i get home later in the week!

      2. Strain your mango pulp.

        1. i would reduce your mango pulp to a "mango butter." you can do this even in the microwave. add a little brown sugar to it. then nuke for one minute intervals, stirring in between, til it thickens and reduces, and the moisture is less, and the texture gooey. this is what i do for pumpkin cookies and whatnot.

          1 Reply
          1. re: Emme

            I will try this with the +2 T of sugar it was suggested that I add. I'll use brown sugar for that and see how it affects the flavor.

          2. Thank you, lots of good ideas already!

            I am going to go look up applesauce muffin recipes for comparison. I do think this needs more mango flavor so I'm going to go ahead and increase the mango pulp. I will add the extra sugar and flour that's been suggested. I don't have any buttermilk or yoghurt on hand but I think by increasing the amount of mango pulp I'll still have the suggested ratio (or close to it) of liquid to flour.

            Oh yeah, and this is canned mango pulp, it's actually more like mango puree. Well, it really IS mango puree, but most folks call it mango pulp. It's the stuff you find in the cans in Indian groceries.

            Gonna look up those applesauce recipes before doing anything final.

            These tasted better and held together better after I let them "set up" for awhile. I guess I was too impatient and didn't let them cool completely before tasting! They still peel some off onto the paper cup but not like before. They taste ok, but the texture is still all wrong.

            5 Replies
            1. re: ZenSojourner

              I think cut-up dried mangos would be really good in muffins.

              1. re: Veggo

                I have some but there's a lot of sugar on them. I guess, now that I think of it, that wouldn't matter much if they're going in muffins!

                I don't know why they coat dried fruits in so much sugar. They're generally sweet enough all by themselves.

                1. re: ZenSojourner

                  I'm not sure it is added. Could it be the natural sugars crystallizing during the drying process? The ones I have make no mention of sugar on the ingredient list.

                  1. re: Veggo

                    Nope, these mango slices have been dried and then coated in sugar. Where they're folded over - no sugar. Other kinds I've bought in the past - at least some of them - don't have this sugar coating. I don't eat a lot of dried fruit other than mangos, but I use dried peaches and dried apricots to make a chutney, those aren't coated. I've seen some dried cantelope/muskmelon type stuff that is coated.

                    I guess I should have looked at the ingredients before I bought them - sugar is ingredient #2.

                    Oh well, should still be OK for chopping up and putting in muffins. Might help with the not-enough-mango flavor thing I've got goin' on.

              2. re: ZenSojourner

                if you reduce the mango first to mango butter, this will concentrate the flavor, as you'll need more mango to make the amount of pulp you'll need. insta-mangofied.

              3. OK, so as it turns out, it's not quite as mango-heavy as i thought - i developed the recipe for a friend a couple of years ago. if you want to increase the mango flavor, just omit the apple and sub extra mango instead. to use mango puree instead of the whole fruit, sub sugar (i prefer coconut or turbinado) for the agave - that will help balance the dry:wet ingredient ratio. oh, and you can easily bake it in muffin tins instead of a loaf pan - that's one of the things i love about quick breads - versatility :)

                GHG's WHOLE WHEAT MANGO QUICK BREAD

                1 large egg plus 2 large egg whites
                ¼ cup grapeseed oil
                2½ cups whole wheat pastry flour
                ¾ cup raw agave nectar
                1 teaspoon baking powder
                1 teaspoon baking soda
                1½ teaspoons ground ginger
                1 teaspoon cinnamon
                ¼ teaspoon salt
                1 large mango, peeled, pitted & diced [should yield 1 – 1¼ cup]
                1 large Granny Smith apple, peeled, cored & grated [should yield 1 cup]
                ¾ cup dried cherries or cranberries [soaked/rehydrated in ¼ cup pomegranate or apple juice, and drained]
                grated zest of ½ lime

                Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F. Grease an 8½ x 4½ inch loaf pan, dust the inside with flour and tap out excess.

                In a medium bowl, whisk together the eggs, egg whites, oil and agave nectar.
                In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, ginger, cinnamon and salt. Pour wet ingredients into dry, and mix with a wooden spoon or heavy rubber spatula until blended [batter will be very thick]. Fold in the mango, apples, cherries or cranberries, and lime zest. Scrape batter into prepared pan and smooth the top with a rubber spatula.

                Bake on the center rack for 90 minutes, or until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean. [If it looks as though the top is browning too much as it bakes, tent loosely with foil.]

                Transfer the pan to a wire rack and cool for 5 minutes, then run a knife around the sides of the pan, unmold, and cool right side up on a rack.