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Can you recommend a starch to serve with coq au vin?

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  • E_M Oct 20, 2010 06:17 AM
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I am tired of egg noodles and don't like buttered potatoes. I was thinking a gratin (but didn't know if the cheese would complete with the chicken) or a potato-apple kugel. What do you you think? What do you like to serve?

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  1. Well, since either egg noodles or steamed potatoes are the usual accompaniments, and that's out for you, how about just nice crusty bread, good butter and a simple green salad with a vinaigrette? There's no real hard and fast rule that you have to serve a starch with this dish, although noodles and potatoes stand as a way to sop up all the delicious sauce. A potato gratin, baked in cream with just a bit of Gruyère or a Swiss-type on top, could be very nice, if you were thinking about a potato gratin.

    Here's a older thread link, which also includes a discussion about what type of chicken you should use; maybe you can get some ideas from it (posters suggested couscous or fingerling potatoes roasted in goose fat, mm...)

    http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/2887...

    Bon appétit!

    1 Reply
    1. re: bushwickgirl

      Thanks for the link. Potatoes roasted in fat: divine. I do that when I roast chicken.

    2. How about a seasonal squash gratin?

      1. I normally serve mine with a nice tangy, crusty sourdough loaf. Every now and then if i beg my friend the french baker to make a country loaf, he does one of those huge breads and those also go well with coq au vin. On an inventive whirl once, I made persian rice chelo (yellow rice with a golden crust on the bottom) - and if i remember it went ok with the coq-au-vin.

        2 Replies
        1. re: cornFusion

          cornFusion, I'd love a link or a brief explanation for the rice chelo, if you don't mind. TIA.

          1. re: mamachef

            Sorry about taking so long .... here is a link to a recipe... http://www.alleasyworld.com/Iranian-C...

            I use a recipe from a book called "In a Persian Kitchen" (http://www.amazon.com/Persian-Kitchen...)

        2. I'd definitely suggest some crusty bread or mashed potatoes to sop up that delicious sauce.

          1 Reply
          1. re: bear

            My most-excellent-of-a-cook friend served it on top of mashed potatoes at a dinner party, it was wonderful.

          2. Would polenta be out of line?

            2 Replies
            1. re: blue room

              That was my thought for something different. I was thinking a firm polenta, pan fried in slices. That way you get the starch, soft interior, and crispy exterior to provide a good texture contrast to the chicken.

              1. re: sbp

                Yes to polenta! I've made it with Coq au Vin, and it's now my prefered accompaniment. The flavors blend beautifully. I prepare it as sbp suggests.

                ~Liz

            2. Polenta would work fine...but I'd stay away from kugels and gratins, because it would be a shame to overpower the amazing flavor of a good coq au vin.

              1. Frites

                1 Reply
                1. re: Chinon00

                  Ditto!

                2. Orzo!

                  1. The French would definitely eat only white baguette with their coq au vin. It's the best thing. However, the Hungarians have similar recipes and they use little dumplings to go with it. They are quite easy to make: plain white flour and little salt mixed with ice-cold water so that a dough thicker than for pancakes but still quite thin so that you have to keep it in a bowl, leave for 15-30 minutes to stand in the fridge. Then transfer to cutting board and cut out small pieces (big as nails on your hand) into boiling water and cook until they rise to the surface. You have to stir them at least once to unstick the ones stuck to the bottom of the pot. After they're cooked, stir a little butter or olive oil through. Eat immediately.

                    1. it's not traditional, but what about large-grain couscous?

                      1. I'd make a simple basmati-rice and herb dish, or some spaetzle.

                        2 Replies
                        1. re: mamachef

                          right, I was thinking gnocchi might also be good.

                          1. re: ChristinaMason

                            yeah, i was trying to think exactly what the French equivalent to gnocchi or spaetzle would be? Because no matter what, that delicious sauce requires a "sopper", even if it's just a delicious crusty,bready piece of baguette and butter to dip.

                        2. Thanks for everyone's replies! You've given me a lot to work with.

                          3 Replies
                          1. re: E_M

                            Let us know what your final decision is and how the meal came out.

                            1. re: bushwickgirl

                              I decided to "table" the coq au vin and roast a chicken instead, so that I can cook potatoes alongside the chicken and reap the benefits of the cooked-in-chicken-fat goodness.

                              For sides: green salad and roasted asparagus with mushrooms
                              For desert: apple-cranberry crisp

                              1. re: E_M

                                Sounds lovely, and they'll be time for coq au vin in the future!

                          2. Classic would be fried bread. Works so well.

                            3 Replies
                            1. re: Harters

                              Not being snarky here, Harters...fried bread? Really? Where?

                              I ask because I've only ever seen it with potatoes or noodles (AND a fresh baguette on the side, bien sur.)

                              1. re: sunshine842

                                I saw it first, as a recipe, in Elizabeth David's "French Provincial Cooking" but have eaten it like this in France (although I havnt seen it on a menu there for some years - perhaps it's passed out of favour as a dish).

                                Google will find you a number of recipe references including the bread (of course, perhaps they've all blagged it off David)

                                1. re: Harters

                                  Interesting...I'll have to look for that one.