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Old Reliable: Chun Hing

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That's our 'go-to' place when I don't feel like cooking, driving too far, or making a big deal out of eating out. Been going there for at least 40 years: same ownership, many same servers, etc.

I never noticed the Zagat Ratings before: a lot of 22's and 23's over the years. Never thought of them being so high, but well deserved actually, even though I never think of their food as chow.

Tonight I soothed my inner beast with Lobster Cantonese Style--and it was one big treat for $25.99. Always tender, juicy, albeit a small lobster. Seems like more, all cut up in small pieces and with tasty sauce. I also like it with ginger and scallion, or black bean sauce. Whole Maine Lobster is not the only way to truly enjoy lobster--give it a try.

Also enjoyed my favorite soup, not found too many other places: preserved turnip and pork soup, made special by the al dente green string beans. Humor note: on the menu, the dish was described as 'reserved turnip" soup. Shy? Did not have room for the fried dumplings, which are the gold standard for my taste--I never order them anywhere else, knowing I would be disappointed.

Consistency is the name of the game at Chun Hing, as well as pleasant attentive service. Family friendly. Ample parking off City Ave.

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  1. Bashful3, I was there tonight too and had Lobster Cantonese as well. This was the first time there and we liked it a lot although it is a bit of a trek for us - but not as far as downtown would be. I appreciate the recommendation which you made a while ago. My hubby actually recognized a waitress there who used to work at a Chinese restaurant much closer to us. But that place normally doesn't have lobster dishes and I have been craving Lobster Cantonese for awhile. A little pricey at $26 especially compared to the rest of the menu, but to me it was worth it.

    1. YES!!!

      I can't tell you how happy it makes me to see my old standby written up on these pages. I haven't been in over 10 years, but I grew up on Chun Hing. It is and will always be the benchmark by which I judge Americanized chinese food.

      If ever I go again, I'll be ordering: house special egg roll, hot and sour soup, spare ribs, singapore noodles, "shing tau" chicken, shrimp in black bean sauce, sesame chicken, string beans with bean curd and garlic sauce, and moo shoo pork. Party on.

      1 Reply
      1. re: nwinkler

        Oh Faye: I'll bet you were with one of the two large round family tables having a wonderful wonderful time! Wish we could have said hello in any case. What a coincidence. And, the whole point of Chowhound posting is to introduce others to our favorite places and dishes they might not have discovered otherwise. Thanks for letting me know.

        Glad you were happy by my post, nwinkler! My original fave is 'shing tau' shrimp--oh, to die for. I like your use of the word 'benchmark'. Their fried dumplings are my benchmark for that dish, but I have given up ordering them anywhere else, because no one else, including in Chinatown can measure up to that standard, imo.

      2. Wish this place was a little closer to us than the 45 minute drive. I was thinking about this particularly over the last few days. Visiting Brookline Ma., where our daughter lives, and we were ordering takeout from a Chinese restaurant with a number of lobster dishes on the menu. One was Lobster Cantonese and it came outside the shell. While the description of the sauce sounded different, I ordered it anyway, and it was a big surprise. Some nice (but not enough for the price) chunks of lobster, but the sauce was brown and seemed to consist of a lot of ground pork and black beans and was totally different from the eggy sauce I was used to. This didn't appear to have any eggs and in fact there was so much pork and black beans I took a container of the sauce home. Probably good with rice - by the way the Brookline restaurant didn't include steamed rice. You must have to ask for it. Anyway, I guess Lobster Cantonese isn't the same everywhere. Bashful3 if you are going there anytime soon, we would love to join you. Thanks for the recommendation.

        1 Reply
        1. re: FayeD

          Hey, FayeD, we do go there often, but usually spur of the moment when the thought of
          cooking does not cut it with me. However, if you want to make a date for sharing a lobster
          Cantonese with me, plus other good things, get in touch with me via email, and we can set
          up a time after Sept 23. Crazy schedule before then. We may be close, in Center City, but it still takes us a good half hour to get there. Worth it. carol.vorch@verizon.net.

        2. After reading this post right around lunchtime today (12:30), I decided to go there for take out. The food is amazing, but I definitely felt short changed when it came to their lunch special. A half pint portion of vegetable fried rice and 3/4 of a pint of General Tso's chicken for $6 and some change. If I would have known the portion was that small, I would have gladly ordered a la carte off the regular menu. The kicker to this story is that there was a customer who was asking about how much food comes in a lunch special. The lady behind the counter (I'm assuming owner -- had spots on her face) states it feeds about two people. As the picture shows, it seems more like a snack rather than a meal lol.

          I'm guessing I'm paying for quality than quantity when it comes to their lunch special. When it comes to lunch, I'll stick to Szechuwan Express by the Acme. On a side note, the people there are EXTREMELY nice and talk your ear off like you're family. Go there for dinner or order a la carte.

           
           
          1 Reply
          1. re: paychecktoday

            this is one of our family favorite restaurants as well. But I've never had the lobster or the preserved turnip soup! I'll have to try them!

            Some favorite dishes of ours are the shrimp egg roll, fried dumplings, wonton soup, chicken with diced peanuts and mushrooms, and squid with five spicy tastes.