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Un-"Natural" Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream

alkapal Sep 27, 2010 01:11 PM

"""The CSPI told the company last month it should not use "all natural" if products contain alkalized cocoa, corn syrup, hydrogenated oil or other ingredients that are not natural."""

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100927/a...

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    ios94 RE: alkapal Sep 28, 2010 07:17 AM

    Heard about it this morning, I always found it strange that it was labeled as "all natural" after reading the ingredients. I just assumed that enough of the ingredients were natural (ie. milk being hormone free) that they were able to get away with this labeling, guess not.

    Did they change their recipe after Unilver bought them?

    It's still the best mass produced ice cream IMO, at least around here.

    1 Reply
    1. re: ios94
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      ferret RE: ios94 Sep 28, 2010 07:22 AM

      They have a lot of mixed-in ingredients (seems like nearly all their flavors have stuff mixed in) that would likely be the culprits. The ice cream alone is pretty straightforward. Here are their ingredients for Vanilla:

      Cream, Skim Milk, Liquid Sugar (Sugar, Water), Water, Egg Yolks, Fair Trade Certified (Tm) Vanilla Extract, Sugar, Guar Gum, Carrageenan

    2. q
      Quimbombo RE: alkapal Sep 28, 2010 07:26 AM

      GOOD !

      Anything with corn syrup/HFCS, which now will be known as 'corn sugar' is unnatural, IMO.

      Now maybe B & J's will strive to make a REAL and authentic natural I/C.

      To their credit B & J's use cream from cows free of hormones. Something Haagen Dazs should start doing.

      1 Reply
      1. re: Quimbombo
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        ferret RE: Quimbombo Sep 28, 2010 08:49 AM

        As I posted above, if and when corn syrup appears in any B&J products it's not from the ice cream, it's from the added ingredients. Same holds true for Haagen Dazs. And nearly all the premium brands use alkalized cocoa. Try to read behind the headlines.

        And "corn syrup", as distinguished from HFCS, has long been used as an ingredient in baking and candymaking, which explains it's presence in the mix-ins.

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