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Your largest pot??

What is your biggest size pot? What size pot do you use to make your soup - and what if your were doubling or tripling your soup?? The largest pot I own is a lightweight blue and white dotted "lobster" pot - not sure it was necessarily designated for that but it is the only thing I use it for - it is too lightweight for good cooking. So discounting that one the largest pot I have is my old 8 qt Farberware. I would love a larger pot. Last week I borrowed my neighbor's "corn" pot which is a heavier stainless one (no name - seems to have a disk on the bottom) and seems to be about 15 Qts. It is a great size for me when I need to make soup for a crowd. What are your suggestions?

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  1. A heavy stainless stock pot I acquired when the contents of a local professional kitchen were being auctioned off. It's cylindrical, 9" high by 11" in diameter, which if I remember my old high school math correctly (A = pi x R squared) gives it a capacity of about 3.2 gallons - in other words, about 15 qts, same as your neighbor's corn pot. Not gigantic but it's been enough for some really good batches of chili.

    1. 24 quart Vollrath tri-ply stock pot. Easily fits 73 chicken carcasses should you need to make large quantities of stock.

      2 Replies
      1. re: wattacetti

        My, you must have small chickens. You live in Rhode Island or Liliput?

        1. re: kaleokahu

          I live in the province where Rotisserie St-Hubert dominates with standardized poultry. Capon carcasses I can do about 30-35 depending on how I break down the bones.

      2. My go to is a 16 qt. I have 1 8 qt, 2 12 qts, and a 32 qt sitting around in case I really feel like making tons of soup/stock/chili/gumbo. But that depends on how much room I have in the freezer and how much ice I have to cool stuff down. I rarely use the 32 qt any more.

        I don't count my water bath canner for quart jars since it's too thin for anything other than canning. YMMV.

        1. My largest is a ss 20 or 24 quart stock pot, I forget which and I'm too lazy to get it out and pour water into it by the quart so I can count. Then I have two smaller 12 quart stainless stock pots. Then several sizes below that in both stock pot format as well as Dutch ovens. I don't bother getting the big one out much anymore unless I'm cooking a whole cow. Or a neighbor's annoying lab that leaves greetings for me on my lawn. Damn dog.

          1. My big pots are lightweight. If I'm going to do serious stuff in that quantity, I do my browing and start roux (what's the plural of roux? rouxes?) in my Dutch oven and transfer it to the big pot after I've started adding liquid, and then continue it there. I've done this for decades and have never had scorching disasters. I cook in such quantities seldom enough that the serious cost of investing in a magnificent big pot is too extravagant fr me. Once a year for...oh, let's pick a figure out of the air, $100. Over 30 years, that brings the cost down. But 30 years ago, I was raising kids and had other, better uses. Now, when I could afford it, it seems superfluous.

            I did, however, rent one gigantic pot to cook a whole country ham after the kids left and I'd won one. Soaked it in the bleach-scrubbed bathtub for two days, and off I went.

            How about going halves with a friend? Or just borrowing it from a friend for as-needed use in return for soup?