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Question about somewhat old Copper Lagostina cookware

k
kitcho Sep 8, 2010 06:41 PM

Hi everyone.

I recently purchased a set of Lagostina copper pots from a garage sale. This set contains 2 sauce pans, one frying pan, and a small dutch oven. "LAGOSTINA SCANDIA - Made in Norway" is stamped on the bottom of each pot/pan. The lids are copper/stainless. As far as I can tell, the pots are copper with stainless steel lining and handles. They seem to have brass rivets as well. They are heavy compared to other cookware I've used but this alone probably doesn't mean much.

All I'd like to know is how old these are (approximately) as well as how good this set is as far as cookware quality goes. To my untrained eyes it seems to be very well built. I found no information about this cookware online and I simply want to get a better idea of what I bought. This is my first cookware set, I hope I did okay.

Thanks in Advance

Photos: http://imgur.com/VAiTTl&bPiIw&...

  1. k
    kitcho Sep 9, 2010 01:38 PM

    I tried emailing Lagostina but they simply sent me a canned reply about warranty redemption which had no relevance whatsoever to what I asked them. I'm not sure where to look at this point, so any info would be helpful.

    1. kaleokahu Sep 9, 2010 04:10 PM

      Your pans are very pretty.

      You are right that they are lined in stainless--more accurately they are "bimetal", i.e., the stainless liners are bonded to the copper outers. The handles appear to be stamped stainless. Stainless handles stay cooler than the brass ones used on many copper pieces these days, so that is a plus. Only cast iron stays cooler longer.

      Your pans also appear to have rolled rims. This technique is typically used to add rigidity to the pan by rolling the copper around a wire all around the lip; flared rims without a full roll and wire are also sometimes used. First-quality pans normally don't have rolled or flared rims because their wall thickness is sufficient to make them very rigid and heat stable.

      I am not familiar with this brand per se, but some Scandinavian makers are old and of good quality.

      As to quality, as compared with all cookware of ALL composition, I'd say you're probably in the upper 5%. If you have a caliper or micrometer, measure the wall and bottom thickness; if it is 2mm or over, your set is as good as about 98% of all cookware out there. If you don't have those tools, if you post the dimensions and weights of each pan and lid, I can give you an educated guess as to thickness.

      Hope this helps. Enjoy your beautiful pans.

      8 Replies
      1. re: kaleokahu
        i
        iyc_nyc Jan 17, 2011 07:13 AM

        Anyone know where to get a caliper that can measure the thickness of a pan with a rolled edge (this type of caliper would also allow you to measure e.g., the thickness of a curved vase)?

        Also, how does one measure the bottom of a pan - would you need a special device for that?

        Thanks in advance.

        1. re: iyc_nyc
          kaleokahu Jan 17, 2011 08:28 AM

          iyc_nyc: Calipers vary in price and availability depending on precision and/or size. You will need a caliper that can be put on the pan below the rolled lip, like this one:

          http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/store/Measuring___Calipers___Inside_Outside_Caliper___in_out_caliper?Args=

          To measure the bottom, you need a caliper that can span the entire pan height with room to spare, like this one:

          http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/sto...

          If you don't have another use for calipers, I'd suggest you visit a machinist's or woodturner's shop with your pan and have them measure--they'd probably do it for free.

          1. re: kaleokahu
            m
            mikie Jan 17, 2011 10:48 AM

            The easier way, is to measure something that is of fixed dimension, then measure it again while it's attached in some way to the pot, hand held would be one way to affix it to the pot and then subtract the initial measurement from the second to get the pot thickness. For the most accuracy you can use a vernier caliper (least expensive), a dial caliper (more expensive), or a digital readout caliper (most expensive). http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_...

            If the pot is less than 6" deep, since most of these are 6" calipers, you can use the depth rod that is part of the caliper to measure to the rim from inside and outside of the pan and subtract to get the bottom thickness. You can span the pan with a rigid steel rule to make this easier. You can do this all with a tool that's under $10 to $20. I have a plastic one that was a freebee at a trade show that I use for rough measurements and a $90 Brown Sharpe for serious measurements.

            1. re: mikie
              kaleokahu Jan 17, 2011 11:03 AM

              mikie: "The easier way, is to measure something that is of fixed dimension, then measure it again while it's attached in some way to the pot, hand held would be one way to affix it to the pot and then subtract the initial measurement from the second to get the pot thickness."

              You're saying hold flat shimstock against the outside wall so as to make perpendicular caliper jaws work around the rolled rim, and then net out the shim thickness?

              As to the bottom thickness, your suggestion should work (and save a buck) if iyc_nyc has a machinist's rule and measures well inward of the edge radius. Maybe not out to much of a decimal place, but surely could tell 2mm from 3mm.

              1. re: kaleokahu
                m
                mikie Jan 17, 2011 11:23 AM

                "You're saying hold flat shimstock against the outside wall so as to make perpendicular caliper jaws work around the rolled rim, and then net out the shim thickness?"

                Ed Zachery! Something with a bit of a curve might make it a bit easier, but yes, you have the concept dead on. It introduces a small variable, but were not talking a space shuttle launch here.

                I worked in a Quality Control lab for a while after college and you learn all kinds of ways to take measurements on odd shapes.

                1. re: mikie
                  i
                  iyc_nyc Jan 17, 2011 07:50 PM

                  Thanks -- brilliant idea, Mikie. And Kaleo, many thanks for your links - I'm likely going to order from there.

                  1. re: iyc_nyc
                    kaleokahu Jan 17, 2011 08:04 PM

                    iyc_nyc: No problem. Calipers can be useful for lots of other things, too.

                    Cookware manufacturers can be pretty slippery when it comes to thicknesses and layers--many won't publish even the overall thickness, much less the 3-, 5- and 7-layer bars' individual layers. For example, I've been trying for months now to determine the thickness of the copper layer in Chantal's Copper Fusion line. It's not in their literature, the dealers don't know, and Chantal won't say. All I can find out is that the pan's OAT is 2.5mm, and that it's a 5-layer sandwich of enamel+steel+copper+steel+enamel.

                    One of the few counterexamples is Calphalon, whose outlet stores and retailers are supplied with "cutaway" pans, so you can actually SEE what's inside and how thick it is.

                    1. re: kaleokahu
                      i
                      iyc_nyc Jan 17, 2011 08:10 PM

                      Yep, reminds me of mattress buying - same problem, and worse now with all the 'engineered' mattresses.

                      I have a new Staub and it appears MUCH thinner than my other Staub, even though it's larger - but want to make sure it's not just the rim that's thinner. Hoping that's the case. The new Staub also seems inferior quality in other ways (uneven enamel with some CI showing thru, etc.) - but it would be shocking if Staub makes different grade pots/pans even when they are selling for comparable prices and appear to be in the same line.

                      Also still need to measure some copper pans.. :-)

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