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New “casual place” by Iñaki Aizpitarte near/ next to Chateaubriand?

Back in May (http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/7074...) I saw posted here, from PhilD: “I understood [Iñaki Aizpitarte] had dropped lunch at Chateaubriand as he was planning a casual place 'next door.' " And by Phyllis Flick in the same thread: “From what I've heard (and it was a very knowledgeable source) he is taking over Le Dauphin, which is right next to Chateaubriand at 131, ave. Parmentier, Paris 11th."

We’ll be in the neighborhood pretty soon, and I’m wondering: Has this happened/ what’s the status? -- Jake

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  1. DK, will check in a couple of days.

    1. I drove by this morning while on the bus and it doesn't look like renovations have gotten very far, although there was a light on, so hopefully they are working on it.

      1. John and Phyllis, thanks for these responses. I know that these things take time -- and I look forward to your updates in the coming months. -- Jake

        1. Opening today I think. Get ready for the blaggers, hangers on and just plain freaky Inaki worshippers to clog the net with how great it is.

          2 Replies
          1. re: adrian

            Thanks Adrian, I'll go to Eugene tmrw and check on I.A. later

          2. The original comment has been removed
            1. What's up with Le Fooding naming it among it's winners when it hasn't even opened? Shades of the Michelin fiasco a couple of years back, that created such an uproar, yet no one to my knowledge has even mentioned the untimeliness of Le Fooding's announcement. Am I missing something here?

              The older I get, the less sense this old world seems to make.

              1. re: Laidback

                Yah, l'Express had a teaser too about it being about to open and what I.A. does on a sample weekend.

                1. re: Laidback

                  >>> What's up with Le Fooding naming it among it's winners when it hasn't even opened?

                  Heh.. they know they're going to like it ;-) they don't even need to eat there.
                  They're just showing that they can do as good as the Michelin.

                  1. re: Ptipois

                    It reminds me of the expat blogger reaction to the new Spring..!

                    1. re: PhilD

                      You mean in general? A few examples perhaps? (Thanks.)

                      Actually I think I can figure out what happened. They made up the "Prix Fooding du meilleur décor" for the occasion so that they could include the yet unopened restaurant. Clever (or not).

                      1. re: Ptipois

                        Do I mean in general? Maybe not. To me it is reminiscent of the automatic expectation that it will be without fault before a single mouthful of food has been consumed, and once opened there is a barrage of un-critical reviews. It sums up quite well on this thread: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/7167... and then is somewhat tempered by: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/7453... - my guess is that the "truth" lies somewhere between the two.

                        I am a fan of Iñaki Aizpitarte and Daniel Rose and like to see their success - I will be interested in the reviews after the initial hype and then inevitable "over correction" has taken place. Both important openings and both I will try when I next get time to get to Paris.

                        1. re: PhilD

                          I see what you mean. What I see in the first thread though is a lot of expectation, indeed, but no one really acts certain that the food will be flawless when they'll be able to taste it at last. They rather hope it will be at least as good as the old Spring. It is more about booking complications and - for some - overdramatizing the importance of getting a reservation as if their life depended on it. I see a lot of adoration but no real speculation over food that hasn't been tasted yet.

                          As for the second thread, it does look slightly like a case of burning-what-they-adored but I also see serious concerns about the opacity of the pricing and the result is disappointment, perhaps disproportionate as a consequence of former worship.

                          True, the two situations are structurally similar but I do see more of an attitude and a tad of cynicism in Le Fooding pinning an award onto an unopened restaurant and making up a non-food category for that. For Spring it's just fans expressing their feelings, for Le Fooding there's a bit of class pride added.