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Glasgow for NYC foodie?

d
docrck Aug 14, 2010 01:02 PM

Hi

We'll be coming in to Glasgow from NYC for 4 nights for a conference. We all love great food and have no problems travelling for it.

I'd love any suggestions for amazing food there. The key is not the price or the location, but the quality of the food for sure.

Thanks in advance!

docrck

  1. c
    chochotte Aug 18, 2010 12:10 PM

    Resident there for four years now; here are my recs:

    Stravaigin on Gibson Street, sit upstairs, for wonderful food with global influences, but still the classics if you should want them, and a really great, gastro-pubby atmosphere. Good for weekend brunch, too.

    Other good West End choices:
    The Left Bank (Gibson Street) and its sister restaurant on Byres Road, The Two Figs.
    No. 16 Byres Road, opposite the Two Figs.
    Crabshakk on Argyle Street for simply done fresh seafood.
    Kember and Jones on Byres road for the best scones, cakes, brownies etc in the city - afternoon tea is nice here, but the sandwiches and salads are also something to behold!
    Cafezique on Hyndland Street is a wonderful modern British restaurant, very chilled out.

    Banana Leaf on Old Dumbarton Road is one of the most fantastic take-aways I've tried anywhere:
    http://home.btconnect.com/glasgowprop... - south Indian cuisine, and so cheap it's untrue. I adore the masala dosa and the uttapam.

    For great pre- or post-dinner cocktails, go to the lounge of the Blythswood Hotel, on Blythswood Square - they really know what they're doing and have an awesome list.

    Other nice bars include Chinaski's (a whisky bar) and the Wee Chip on Ashton Lane, right behind Hillhead Subway.

    Finally, cabs are so insanely cheap in Glasgow that you should be able to get to any of these places for not too much.

    Happy eating and enjoy my wonderful city!

    20 Replies
    1. re: chochotte
      c
      curiouseater Aug 18, 2010 01:10 PM

      Hello, I agree with chochotte Stravaigin is pretty consistently good. Another place worth a try is Cail Bruich on Great Western Road which uses Scottish produce with more of a contemporary twist than say the sisters or two fat ladies at the buttery. For more fancy meals La Valle Blanche, Michael Caines at Abode or One Devonshire are all good.

      1. re: curiouseater
        d
        docrck Aug 19, 2010 08:04 AM

        Thanks curiouseater!

        One night we have a big group of us for dinner (15 adults!) and I was thinking of trying to reserve a table at two fat ladies at the buttery. Seemed not too overpriced and good. Thoughts?

        1. re: docrck
          CarrieWas218 Aug 19, 2010 03:22 PM

          I was at Two Fat Ladies last fall and had one of the most memorable meals of my life.

          You can see pictures and read the whole report here: http://feast-blog.com/glasgow-two-fat...

          1. re: CarrieWas218
            h
            Harters Aug 20, 2010 03:47 AM

            The Buttery has gone through a number of changes over the years (it's nearly 20 since we last ate there). Good to hear it's still doing well under its "Fat Ladies" guise.

            1. re: Harters
              d
              docrck Aug 20, 2010 10:24 AM

              And they were so accomodating when I emailed them regarding our group dinner with 15 adults! In NYC, they'd have required a full payment in advance and probably my first child to hold the reservation!

              1. re: docrck
                c
                curiouseater Aug 23, 2010 11:43 AM

                Hello, sorry meant to get back to you. The two fat ladies at the Buttery is a good choice, I am glad they were accommodating to you. Its a charming venue with the original wooden panelling which luckily escaped the fire that put paid to the original Buttery a couple of years ago. We used to there every Christmas as it had a lovely feel. Just one thought though, it's in a bit of an unlikely area ie a housing estate so if you are walking there dressed up you might feel a bit daft but if you are getting a taxi you will be fine. I wonder if they will ask you to agree to a pre-arranged menu due to your party size? The grand dessert is a sweet tooth persons heaven if a bit excessive!

                1. re: curiouseater
                  d
                  docrck Aug 23, 2010 12:55 PM

                  Hi there. Thanks for the heads up re location. We'll take taxi's there I imagine. They offered us three pre-arranged menus to choose from for the adults and noted that the chef will be able to handle the children with us no problem. One of the menu options (the most pricey) had the grand dessert but the one we picked has a choice of a hot chocolate pudding, a creme brulee or a cheese platter. Will keep you posted!

            2. re: CarrieWas218
              d
              docrck Aug 24, 2010 01:36 PM

              great post. I'm looking forward to our visit

        2. re: chochotte
          d
          docrck Aug 19, 2010 08:03 AM

          Thanks so much chochotte. All noted!

          Will be staying at the Blythswood Hotel so the cocktail recommendation sounds perfect. One each day won't hurt!

          Glad to hear about the cabs. I was wondering how expensive it would be to get to all the great places that have been recommended.

          1. re: docrck
            c
            chochotte Aug 19, 2010 10:13 AM

            From the Blythswood to the furthest west you'd want to go - say, Cafezique or Crabshakk - it shouldn't be more than about £5 or £6, so split between a few of you (taxis are all traditional black cabs, so they seat at least 5), it's peanuts.

            Just wanted to add - remember that there are VERY different expectations of service in the UK compared to the States. Lower, that is! I've just come back from NYC and it's so striking. But then, you only have to tip 10% for good service in the UK, so...

            1. re: chochotte
              d
              docrck Aug 19, 2010 02:13 PM

              Cool thanks. Very much looking forward to our trip. Glad you let me know about the service too.

              NYC is crazy isn't it?

              1. re: chochotte
                h
                Harters Aug 19, 2010 03:16 PM

                "remember that there are VERY different expectations of service in the UK compared to the States. Lower, that is!"

                Interesting comment. I've been visiting America since 1980 and I'm struggling to think of what "extra" I'd want from American service over what I get from British service.

                1. re: Harters
                  c
                  chochotte Aug 20, 2010 04:44 PM

                  Trained waiting staff? Smiles?

                  But seriously, I am fine with UK service; it's what I'm used to. But - there's a difference; I mean, in fine dining restaurants in both countries I think the standard is about similar, but I can walk into a casual restaurant in NYC and get better service (faster, friendlier, more attentive - sometimes overly so, for me, I mean, I don't need my water topped up every two sips!) than in a casual restaurant in the UK.

                  1. re: chochotte
                    h
                    Harters Aug 21, 2010 02:22 AM

                    I think the "more attentive" may be the general difference between transatlantic expectations. I prefer (by a considerable margin) the less intrusive style that we generally have in Europe to that I generally find in north America.

                2. re: chochotte
                  c
                  crispysaltysweet Aug 20, 2010 03:26 AM

                  I've always had excellent service at Crabshakk, equal to a fine dining place in the states- without any pretense though, which I prefer.

                  Blythswood hotel looks fab! Have a great time. There is a great cocktail bar down the street called the Blue Dog too- they do Jazz at night- may be worth checking out. On West George Street.

                  If you go to Crabshakk check out the Ben Nevis pub across the street for a wee dram of whiskey- they have a great selection with a nice ambiance.

                  1. re: crispysaltysweet
                    d
                    docrck Aug 20, 2010 10:22 AM

                    yay! thanks. I've been wondering where to go for some great whiskey. thanks crispysaltysweet.

                    docrck

                    1. re: docrck
                      h
                      Harters Aug 20, 2010 10:37 AM

                      Although bear in mind, Scottish people (as the rest of we Brits) spell it whisky, not whiskey.

                      1. re: Harters
                        c
                        crispysaltysweet Aug 23, 2010 02:40 AM

                        haha, I am showing my American upbringing!

                      2. re: docrck
                        c
                        chochotte Aug 20, 2010 04:42 PM

                        But if you want whiskey (the 'e' signalling American or Irish) rather than whisky, then Chinaski's is a bourbon bar. Obviously though, you'd probably rather try the Scottish stuff, and yeah, the Ben Nevis is LOVELY. Try a whisky mac, too - whisky with ginger wine. Warms the cockles of your heart, that does!

                      3. re: crispysaltysweet
                        c
                        chochotte Aug 20, 2010 04:45 PM

                        The service at Crabshakk is great, I agree. I think it helps that it's such a tiny place.

                3. c
                  crispysaltysweet Aug 17, 2010 08:36 AM

                  Hi docrck

                  I would recommend a few places- for indian I would try Dahkin on Candleriggs in the Merchant City- Indian food unlike anything I've ever had in the states, you won't recognize anything on the menu but it all tastes amazing! The dahba down the street is owned by the same guys and has a little more ambiance if you are after that.

                  Try Crabshakk (reservations a must- it's tiny and you'll be sharing your elbow room for sure, be prepared) for seafood one of my favs right now.

                  If you're looking to sample scottish fare you can try Ubiquitous Chip (the upstairs bistro is more affordable if on a budget), Stravaggin, or Cafe Gandolfi.

                  Glasgow has loads of italian places, my favourite is the Italian Kitchen in the Merchant City, which can also be busy so you may want a reservation.

                  Finally check out Guys in the merchant city.

                  Enjoy your visit!

                  2 Replies
                  1. re: crispysaltysweet
                    d
                    docrck Aug 18, 2010 10:19 AM

                    Thanks much crispysaltysweet. Looking forward to being in Glasgow. I enjoy great Indian food in new york city but there is a lot to be said for Indian food across the ocean. Many consider the quality better in the UK

                    1. re: docrck
                      h
                      Harters Aug 18, 2010 10:36 AM

                      Dunno whether the food's generally any good, but you may be interested in the Shish Mahal - the restaurant now touted as "inventing" the chicken tikka masala dish.

                      http://www.shishmahal.co.uk/restauran...

                  2. abby d Aug 16, 2010 03:31 AM

                    have you done a seach - there are a few threads about glasgow.

                    i've had mixed experinces - places i loved on one visit were less good when i revisited (full posts on my blog). a consistent favourite, which i ate at for breakfast each time but is also open at lunch and in the evening, is left bank - http://www.theleftbank.co.uk/. it's sister restaurant looked good but i haven't made it there yet.

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