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How do you stretch bacon fat?

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I have a recipe that calls for frying something in bacon fat, but after cooking a pound of regular (not low fat or low sodium) bacon, I don't have nearly enough fat to fry everything. What is the best way to stretch it? Crisco, vegetable oil or butter? I don't have time to run out and buy another pound of bacon. Any thoughts would be welcome.

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      1. When I saw the title of this thread I could not help but think, "Very carefully".

        1. For frying in large amounts of fat, butter isn't a good choice as it burns as it heats up - if you use butter, clarify it first.

          Otherwise, I'd go with Crisco.

          1. Frying as in sauteeing, or frying as in deep-frying?

            1 Reply
            1. re: eight_inch_pestle

              That was my question -- which is key.

              When the OP says frying, does she mean pan-frying (or sauteeing) or does she mean frying in a deep-fryer.

              If the former than a bit of butter will do just fine.

              If you are deep-frying, however, butter is a bad substitute. It's not idea for frying since it will burn at a lower temperature than most oils. I would just go for something with a high smoke point like corn or peanut oil.

            2. A few years ago, I made Rosengarten's Boeuf à la Bourguignonne, and it involved browning the beef in a combination of butter and bacon fat (because you first cooked the bacon IN the butter).

              A-freaking-mazing.

              1. IMHO, Nothing can replace the flavor of pork fat. If you must, use a light oil. But, if I were you, I would just go buy another pound of bacon. The way you cook the bacon is the issue. I use this technique to make bacon bits on a almost daily basis.

                Stack the bacon into a small bunch. Cut the bacon into 1/4 pieces. Add the bacon to a medium pot & cook over medium high heat for 20-30 minutes until the bacon is crispy. Then strain the bacon fat into a heat proof bowl. This actually renders the majority of the fat from the bacon.

                I normally end up with 1 to 1 1/2 cups of fat per 3-4 pounds of bacon.

                1. I agree that if you use butter, clarify it. I guess you use butter flavored crisco.

                  You could get another pound of bacon but you want the cheap stuff. After it is rendered, you can make bacon bits and store them in a jar or even freeze them. There is always a need for a tablespoon of bacon bits.

                  1. When I saw the thread the only answer I could come up with would be bacon flavored salt water taffy.

                    1. I always keep a tub of lard in the pantry just for this reason. I'd go with butter if lard isn't available.

                      1 Reply
                      1. re: jcattles

                        There you go. Lard... it's a pork fat thing. Well animal fat anyway.

                        If you're going to stretch it, lard is the next closest thing.