HOME > Chowhound > Outer Boroughs >

Discussion

any high quality sushi in brooklyn/queens??

  • m
  • MarkG Aug 2, 2010 02:07 PM
  • 36
  • Share

or do you have to go to the city for the good stuff??

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
Posting Guidelines | FAQs | Feedback
Cancel
  1. There is nothing like Sushi Yasuda in Brooklyn or Queens.

    1. JJ's in Astoria

      Zenkichi in Williamsburg

      They are your best bets for sushi in the boroughs.

      Jj's tuna sashimi with arugula is wonderful as is their tuna sashimi with crisp apple and wasabi

      -----
      Zenkichi
      77 North 6th Street, Brooklyn, NY 11211

      3 Replies
      1. re: Pookipichu

        Zenkichi does not serve sushi.

        -----
        Zenkichi
        77 North 6th Street, Brooklyn, NY 11211

        1. re: Silverjay

          Sashimi

          1. re: Pookipichu

            I was interested in this. As its website says:

            Q: Why is there no sushi on the menu?
            A: Sushi is a completely different category of Japanese cuisine from the Tokyo-style small plates Zenkichi specializes in. We believe that fully focusing on our specialty will help maintain the quality of our food, and hope that not serving sushi would entice more people to explore Japanese cuisine beyond sushi.

            -----
            Zenkichi
            77 North 6th Street, Brooklyn, NY 11211

      2. Katsuno.

        The guy who owns this place also owns Seo in the city. He happens to live in Forest Hills and he personally operates this restaurant daily. The sushi and sashimi here rivals the best I have had anywhere in the world.

        http://www.katsunorestaurant.com/

        103-01 Metropolitan Ave (@ 71Rd
        )Forest Hills, NY 11375

        Tel:1-718-575-4033

        -----
        Katsuno
        103-01 Metropolitan Ave, Queens, NY 11375

        1 Reply
        1. re: simonlok

          yes, this place is absolutely amazing - fish quality is extremely high, making me realize that whatever i've been eating in midtown for lunch is generally garbage (and for that matter, most anywhere else in brooklyn for delivery). also, the cold onsen egg was perfect on a hot summer evening.

          the salmon sashimi is something i frequently think about, meaning - it's time to go back for another visit. good thing my folks are still in the area.

        2. we love Takara in Whitestone on 14th street, VERY good

          1. Taro and Ki in Brooklyn both have very high-quality sushi. Delicious.

            1 Reply
            1. re: bhill

              i don't think ki is anywhere near as good as the better manhattan places.

            2. Geido in Prospect Heights--very good and reasonably priced

              -----
              Geido
              331 Flatbush Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11217

              5 Replies
              1. re: KidA

                Geido is a great spot, but I dont think their sushi is very top qualiy, which seems to be what the OP is looking for.

                -----
                Geido
                331 Flatbush Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11217

                1. re: jen kalb

                  Mickey's in Bayside. Takara in Whitestone use to be good. I use to love their spicy tuna roll. I had it two weeks ago, one piece, and threw the rest out. Too bad, I like the owner.

                  1. re: PaMa

                    +1 for Mickey's

                    1. re: jnab121

                      Mickey's doesn't seem to be as good as when it was in Rego Park. Certain things are different, their hijiki is much too sweet now. But it's still good as far as Queens goes.

                      Yuraku used to be quite good, but that was ages ago, haven't been back since they added Korean dishes.

                      -----
                      Yuraku
                      192-20 Northern Blvd, Queens, NY 11358

                      1. re: Pookipichu

                        I never tried Mickey's at Rego Park. I live in Whitestone and I drive pass at least a dozen other sushi places to go for take out at Mickey's.

                        Don't waste your calories for Yuraku. I think they are now a buffet. I use to love that place but in the past five years I have tried the place half a dozen time and it was down right bad everytime. I love the decor, the beautiful little garden and the service. It use to be such a wonderful oasis in Flushing, but now...sad.

                        -----
                        Yuraku
                        192-20 Northern Blvd, Queens, NY 11358

              2. Gen in Prospect Heights is fantastic. I would also disagree with the quality statement about Geido in Park Slope. Geido also has the benefit of being very family-friendly and very Japanese - they generally have a fair amount of interesting off-the-menu items if you ask.

                -----
                Gen
                659 Washington Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11238

                2 Replies
                1. re: pantoniades

                  I like Geido quite a lot, dont get me wrong. Its a great neighborhood Japanese restaurant. I just have not been super impressed by the orders of sushi we have received sitting at a table. Maybe the quality sitting at the sushi bar is superior but the OP seems to be looking for sushi that would match up to Manhattan's best. Do you think Geido's and Gen does?

                  -----
                  Geido
                  331 Flatbush Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11217

                  1. re: pantoniades

                    I second Gen.

                  2. If by high quality, you mean something like Kuruma Zushi, Sushi of Gari or Sushi Yasuda, the answer is a resounding no. The quality of fish required for places like those is not in the reach of the typical place in Brooklyn. Since the fish is not the best, they have to get "inventive" and create all sorts of rolls or pile on sauces. That appeals to a larger audience than a traditional sushi place anyways. The closest you will get to a traditional sushi place is Blue Ribbon in Park Slope. They also have a pretty good sake list. One place that is not a sushi restaurant but has sushi that is above the mass generic Japanese places with identical menus is Hibino in Cobble Hill. Decent sake list there too. I think that one of the best indicators of the quality of the sushi in any Japanese restaurant is the depth of the sake list. If all they carry is the rot gut in a hot carafe, meh.

                    -----
                    Hibino
                    333 Henry St, Brooklyn, NY 11201

                    8 Replies
                    1. re: Bkeats

                      Hmm. Not sure about your sake list as a barometer for sushi restaurants theory. In Japanese dining culture, mixing sake and sushi is considered sort of “traif”- perhaps analogous to drinking red wine with fish / white wine with meat. Sake is made from rice and is traditionally considered a separate course independent of sushi. Speaking from an ultra-Washoku orthodoxy perspective, only one or the other would be served. But anyway, the two aren’t typically served together and most authentic sushi restaurants may not even offer sake or if they do, it’s a nominal selection. Japanese restaurants in the U.S. seem to often serve both because they tend to have broad menus serving much more than sushi. Also, I think some places are trying to culturally meet expectations that sake is part of the Japanese dining experience. Anyway, my point is, I wouldn’t hold it against a sushi restaurant for not having a deep sake list and in fact, that may be a positive sign that the restaurant is ultra committed to an authentic sushi experience.

                      1. re: Silverjay

                        Ok - but here in Brooklyn/Queens as opposed to Japan, I think its actually a pretty good indicator. The reason I think it works is that a place that has an interesting sake selection has a better understanding of Japanese food as opposed to being one of the run of the mill places that all seem to have the identical menu of sushi/sashimi/teriyaki/tempura/udon/hibachi. Unlikely to ever run into one of those in Japan.

                        Besides what's wrong with having a pinot noir with my fish? I'm just a boor.

                        1. re: Bkeats

                          I don't think good sushi restaurants, anywhere in the world, are going to comprimise classic Japanese dining sensibilities. But if you're looking for a good izakaya or omnibus Japanese restaurant, a good sake and shochu selection definitely is a good sign.

                          1. re: Silverjay

                            I dont think any one has mentioned Taro Sushi on this thread. Im reluctant to weigh in on the sushi quality debate, but certainly Taro has had its partisans here. It also has some sakis by the glass and bottle on its menu. And its about to move up to my corner (St. Marks Ave and Flatbush) from its current Dean Street location.

                            -----
                            Taro Sushi
                            244 Flatbush Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11217

                            1. re: jen kalb

                              Went once and wasn't a fan and probably won't return, but it does have its' admirers and someone mentioned they get deliveries from Tsukiji.

                              As another candidate, there's a relatively recently opened place in Williamsburg called One or Eight...or is is 1or8...Anyway, the chef used to work at Jewel Bako I believe. They have a decent sake and shochu list which may or may not portend to good sushi.

                              http://www.oneoreightbk.com/

                              1. re: Silverjay

                                This looks like a place I have to try. I will let you know how the sake indicator works.

                                1. re: Silverjay

                                  Finally got to 1 or 8. Really interesting space and decor with the shell casings in the walls. Nice list of sakes and cocktails. Ordered a bottle of junmai sake and looked over the menu. Ordered the trio of tartares, the oyster sampler special and tempura to start. The tartares were interesting with the mackeral being the favorite. Thought the trio sampler of oysters were only ok. The pacific ones seemed to have spent too much time out of the water while the ones from virginia were quite good. The tempura was allright. We did the omakase for sushi. Fish was fantastic - much better than anything else in brooklyn I've been to. The horse mackeral was a standout. The sushi was so good that we ordered another round of our favorites from the omakase. All in all, a great meal. Its not the most convenient place to get to but I think its worth the effort.

                                  -----
                                  1 or 8
                                  66 S 2nd St, Brooklyn, NY 11211

                                2. re: jen kalb

                                  Taro was mentioned in an August 8th post. So was Ki Sushi in the same post, which I'm surprised no one commented on. Taro went downhill, in my opinion, when the head sushi chef left. Ki has been consistently amazing.

                                  They also get shipments from Tsukiji and have amazing seasonal sushi on their Supreme Omakase. Hokkaido uni, white salmon, Kumamoto oysters and their o-toro are among my favorites. And while it's not the bliss that Sushi Yasuda is, it comes pretty close and is very reasonably priced.

                                  -----
                                  Ki Sushi
                                  122 Smith St, Brooklyn, NY 11201

                                   
                        2. Unless you live in the area I don't see why you would eat sushi in Brooklyn/Queens as it is not known for a high amount of Japanese.

                          Brooklyn has a long history of having some of the best Pizza outside of Italy and I would definately try some of that if I was there. Brooklyn & Queens also many ethnic enclaves of Orthodox Jews, Puerto Ricans, Irish as well as recent influxes of Chinese, Koreans, Russians, Ukrainians, Dominicans, Arabs, Mexicans, Caribbeans, and Pakistanis.

                          If you are really set on Asian then Queens has a Little Manila (along Roosevelt), and in Flushing a Korean area (some really interesting stews and BBQ's) and a more Mandarin Chinatown (as oppossed to the very Fujinese one in Manhattan).

                          3 Replies
                          1. re: Bookwormgal

                            I don't think the number of Japanese living an area is a very good indicator of the level of Japanese food being served up. Look at Forest Hills. That neighborhood has a large Japanese population but only one decent Japanese restaurant.

                            1. re: Bookwormgal

                              There are a fair number of Japanese in Park Slope as well as Japanese-run restaurants and patronize, tho clearly its not the East Village or N. Jersey. restaurants like Geido, Taro, , Kappa Sake House, etc. I just noticed a new (to me) Ramen place on 5th Ave, which also appears to be japanese run. - have not idea how it is. Sorry off topic.

                              -----
                              Geido
                              331 Flatbush Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11217

                              Kappa Sake House
                              388 5th Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11215

                              Naruto Ramen
                              276 5th Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11215

                              1. re: Bookwormgal

                                Brownstone Brooklyn certainly has the population to support a first-rate sushi restaurant -- whether it's Japanese or affluent non-Japanese -- but sadly, like many other kinds of food in many areas of New York, there's an awful lot of mediocrity.

                                Hibino is not just or mainly sushi -- but it is excellent and unique -- and I often see Japanese people dining there. Have also ran into Japanese regulars at the sushi bar at Taro, which is not "Sushi Yasuda" quality (or cost!) but on a quality/price ratio is in my mind an excellent deal (sit at the bar and order omakase...the "regular" stuff is only eh).

                                That said, ethnicity is not always a reliable guide (if it were, my neighborhood, Carroll Gardens wouldn't have so many bad Italian restaurants!).

                              2. I definitely would add my vote for Mickey's Place on Bell Blvd. in Bayside. Been going there since I lived in Forest Hills and they were also there (on the Rego Park line)... they moved East to Bayside and I moved West to Sunnyside and I STILL go there, plus I've turned a bunch of friends and relatives onto the place and they all swear by it. The thing about Mickey's is that the fish is impeccably fresh, and that's what makes the difference. The place is a family business and has that kind of vibe to it -- they don't do anything very fancy and they don't often stray very far from the familiar, but everything they do is really good, and surprisingly affordable compared to Manhattan prices. Plus, Mickey and Jennifer (the owners) are among the nicest people I know. They really get to know their regular customers, especially, and they and their staff treat them like family.

                                Another recent discovery of mine is TJ Asian Bistro, 50-19 Skillman Ave. in Woodside. This place is small and I understand the non-sushi dishes are average at best (never had any myself). But the sushi/sashimi is good and seemed fresh, and they have a very interesting array of unusual rolls, all served very artfully on beautifully-decorated plates. I don't find the atmosphere as welcoming as Mickey's (though I've only been there once, so maybe they need to get to know you first), and the sushi chefs' response to my question about which fish they especially recommended that day was the predictable but unhelpful "everything is good." But sill, there was much here to like, and I will be trying it again.

                                -----
                                Mickey's Place
                                40-17 Bell Blvd, Queens, NY 11361

                                TJ Asian Bistro
                                50-19 Skillman Ave, Queens, NY 11377

                                1 Reply
                                1. re: BoTo

                                  I get takeout from TJ pretty often. The fish always seems fresh and they have some very interesting rolls. That being said, I wouldn't go there for straight sushi or sashimi. Nothing wrong with it, just not their strong suit.

                                2. I have friends who swear by Linn in Astoria (Broadway and 29th Street)

                                  1 Reply
                                  1. re: abee

                                    Agreed - Linn's head chef is formerly of MASA.