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Opening date for Saus

Anyone know when Saus plans to open? Or if they're already open, how is it?

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  1. "Saus"??? Seriously?

    3 Replies
    1. re: Alcachofa

      Yes, seriously.....
      http://www.eatfrites.com/

      ??

      1. re: Ducksworth

        Love Belgian fries. Thought "Saus" was an attempt at a "hip and trendy" spelling of Sauce, perhaps from the owners of Mkt.

        1. re: Alcachofa

          In Brussels they are double fried in horse fat.

    2. They're in permitting purgatory. They have a blog I check periodically, and today's post was about what they learned from the fire inspector. All in all, it seems things are coming along, slowly.

      http://www.sausinc.blogspot.com/

      1. March 1, per their facebook.

        4 Replies
        1. re: rknrll

          some jackwagon on yelp has already reviewed it, talking about how amazing the food was. wonder how he knows that.

          1. re: jgg13

            Weird.
            There was a post in here earlier from someone saying that they did go today and got some fries (I figured a soft opening)...but it's gone now.
            Yeah that review on Yelp is pretty bad.

            1. re: jgg13

              I heard there was a soft opening today, so it's not impossible.

              1. re: Jenny Ondioline

                IIRC it takes 48 hours for the first reviews to show up on yelp, could be wrong there. The review in question smacked of a ringer. I don't care that much because I wish these guys the best, and I'm planning on having poutine w/ a deep fried egg for lunch tomorrow - but still ...

          2. Well, they're open now. Had their poutine for lunch. It was tasty. I've had a buncha poutine in montreal & quebec but not enough that I would call myself an expert, so don't feel comfortable really putting it in that context (probably 'middle of the pack' from my experience up there) but I liked it quite a bit compared to many of the other options here. My favorite part was the cheese curds, how they had that toothiness that you get up there but don't seem to get down here.

            Had the deep fried egg, which was good because well, it's a deep fried egg. I was a little disappointed that it wasn't one of those fried poached eggs that are popping up now, but that's not their fault. But if they're reading this, putting that on the menu would be the bomb!

            They're totally going to clean up with the late night crowd.

            I'll definitely be back.

            9 Replies
            1. re: jgg13

              Were the portions appropriate for the prices? I don't mind paying $8 for poutine every now and then, especially if it's good, but it had better be a big pile of it.

              1. re: emannths

                It's always to say what's appropriate for the price, particularly considering how expensive everything seems to have become over the last few years but you'll probably be disappointed if you want a big pile of it.

                I had the smaller size, $6. I thought it was pretty reasonable, although it was certainly smaller than the similarly priced option at ASSBar. They seemed to be much more about the fries & dipping sauces as one would expect.

                All in all it's probably priced high, but working in the area I've become pretty used to that for my lunch options. In terms of local lunch I've been more satisfied for less money but also less satisfied for more money so it's probably about right.

                1. re: jgg13

                  The real question is whether $6 will seem like a lot after paying for $5 buds at the area establishments. Interesting that this place did not open in Quincy Market - you would figure the summer hoards would have been right in their wheelhouse...

                  1. re: Bob Dobalina

                    I know that in my own shall we say late night dining affairs, price typically isn't something that I'm considering :)

                    That might actually be part of the pricing strategy here, who knows.

                2. re: emannths

                  Had a Regular sized Frites there today. Felt that it was a tad expensive at $5.85 (after tax). The quality was pretty good (too many burnt ends for my liking) and the sauce that I did have tasted nice, but it didnt fill me up...... I would like to try the Waffles which at around $3.85 (i think) looked to be priced more appropriately and did look quite good.

                  I will be curious to see if their prices come down in the future. I think the idea is good. The space looks nice and clean and the food was a nice altrenative for the area. I will go back.

                  1. re: marcusnaz14

                    For where they are - I doubt they'll reduce their prices. After people spent the night shelling out $6 a piece for a beer - another six for some food at the end of the night is nothing.

                    1. re: marcusnaz14

                      It is a good idea but I get the feeling that one of these young entrepreneurs spent some of their post B-school time in the East Village, near

                      http://www.pommesfrites.ws/menu.htm

                      I'm sure PF isn't the only frites place in the world; the only reason I say that is that when I first moved back from NYC my first thought was, which clever NYC restaurant concept would I steal and present as my own if I had any entrepreneurial spirit?

                      1. re: melon

                        Pommes Frites doesn't have waffles, though.

                        1. re: melon

                          There was a local chain by the same name in the 90s that I think was similar in offerings.

                  2. Just visited with 2 co-workers. We all got waffles and loved them! They were a smidge burnt in some places and lacked some crunch from the caramalized sugar, but the flavor was great. We tried the nutella, salted caramel, berry berry, and lemon cream sauces. My favorites were the nutella (rich, deep chocolate flavor) and the salted caramel (perfect balance of sweet and salty). Can't wait to try the frites!

                    6 Replies
                    1. re: ilovedessert

                      Assuming this is authentic Belgian street food, do they do a filet Americaine (their version of steak tartare)? This stuff on a baguette is one of the most popular lunch items in Brussels.

                      1. re: BobB

                        Le menu: http://www.eatfrites.com/menu.html

                        Fries, err, frites and waffles only.

                        1. re: emannths

                          Thanks. That list of dipping sauces is pretty un-Belgian, but hey, if they taste good so be it.

                          1. re: BobB

                            Eh, they're not trying to pull the wool over anyone's eyes. On their "about us" page, they say "Part classic Americana, part authenic European, Saus takes the best of both worlds by fusing traditional, made-to-order pommes frites (Belgian fries) with an eclectic menu of dipping sauces....We aim to keep the tradition of serving mayo-based sauces, as well as to incorporate some non-traditional flavors."

                            1. re: BobB

                              My assumption is that the "Vampire Slayer" sauce is an aioli: can't get much more Belgian than frites and aioli...

                              1. re: Jenny Ondioline

                                Yup - it's aioli, and quite tasty. A bit mellow, as they use roasted garlic. The Frites were excellent, as was the waffle with salted caramel. The frites were clearly fried at least twice, nice and crunchy without dripping with grease. Definitely put me in a fog for the rest of the day.

                                Apparently Saturday night it was packed to the gills when the bars closed.