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what should i do with a ton of jam that didn't set?

t
tastycakes Jul 1, 2010 04:30 PM

i tried making plum jam this week. i couldn't find low-sugar pectin but tried to make a low-sugar recipe anyway and it didn't set. i haven't had that problem before, i just cook it longer but no matter what i did it still wouldn't gel up. i canned it anyway so it wouldn't spoil and i had already sterilized everything. so what to do with it? i'm too embarrassed to give away "compote."

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  1. greygarious RE: tastycakes Jul 1, 2010 04:59 PM

    You can certainly use it in making glazes for chicken and pork, and as a dessert sauce for ice cream or pound cake. Mix it into plain or vanilla yogurt. Get plain gelatin and make it into jello. But I would not hesitate to use it as jam - a little loose, so what? If you have so much that you need to give it away, bestow it upon understanding friends and family rather than presenting it to the boss or a perfectionist frenemy.

    1. boogiebaby RE: tastycakes Jul 1, 2010 05:00 PM

      Drizzle it on grilled poundcake topped with a scoop of vanilla ice cream.
      Use it as pancake syrup
      A glaze for fruit (put into a pie maybe?)

      3 Replies
      1. re: boogiebaby
        t
        TampaAurora RE: boogiebaby Jul 1, 2010 06:07 PM

        I had a strawberry jam that became strawberry "sauce" when it didn't set because I played around with the recipe and was well received by fellow do it yourself-ers. I traded one jar for one dozen eggs and another for equal quantities of local raw honey.

        1. re: TampaAurora
          coll RE: TampaAurora Jul 2, 2010 05:40 AM

          Same with me, last year it was runny so my husband ate it on ice cream every night. This year I made sure to get it set and he won't touch it! Had to make another runny batch. My advice is, whenever you make a mistake, always pretend it was on purpose ;-)

        2. re: boogiebaby
          Indirect Heat RE: boogiebaby Jul 2, 2010 08:42 AM

          +1. Growing up, we never bought jam, it was always homemade. Anytime a batch failed to set, Mom would turn it into pancake syrup. Even now, she does a few batches where she intends to have them not set up. Chokecherry pancake syrup is tasty...

        3. ipsedixit RE: tastycakes Jul 1, 2010 05:02 PM

          Topping for pound cake and ice cream (as others have suggested).

          It would probably still work in a jelly roll.

          1. r
            runwestierun RE: tastycakes Jul 1, 2010 05:03 PM

            I am wondering if it would work if you mixed some of King Arthur Flour's Clearjel into it when you openned the jar? I love the stuff as a pie thickener because it doesn't require heat to thicken so you can mix it with berries and see how thick your pie filling will be before you add it to the shell.

            1 Reply
            1. re: runwestierun
              j
              janeh RE: runwestierun Jul 1, 2010 05:37 PM

              I just had something similar happen with a mint jelly experiment - not enough pectin, I guess. The result was perfectly canned thick mint syrup.... I may try opening the jars, dumping the syrup into a pot and boiling it again, adding a more suitable amount of pectin (what was I thinking?) and then canning it again.

            2. c
              chowmel RE: tastycakes Jul 1, 2010 05:48 PM

              This link shows how to remake a soft set. It will require more sugar though

              http://pubs.cas.psu.edu/FreePubs/pdfs...

              1 Reply
              1. re: chowmel
                j
                janeh RE: chowmel Jul 1, 2010 09:44 PM

                Chowmel, thank you for the link to such helpful info!

              2. o
                ola RE: tastycakes Jul 1, 2010 05:58 PM

                I've been canning for 40 years and still occasionally get batches that don't set. Every year I combine the ones that didn't set and the ones I didn't like with tomato sauce, molasses, liquid smoke, onions, etc and can bbq sauce. Each batch is a bit different and all are far superior to the BBQ sauces you can buy.

                1 Reply
                1. re: ola
                  t
                  tastycakes RE: ola Jul 1, 2010 08:39 PM

                  i love this idea, off to make BBQ sauce. this weekend is a perfect time.

                2. chowser RE: tastycakes Jul 2, 2010 06:51 AM

                  Add it to tea, sparkling water, champagne.

                  Make a swirl cheesecake or brownie.

                  Brush onto fruit on a tart or dessert for an extra glimmer. Or brush onto a cake and let it absorb.

                  Add to whipped cream, creme fraiche, ricotta or mascarpone for toppings.

                  Give it away as fruit topping for ice cream.

                  It's really a thick chunky simple syrup so anything you'd use simple syrup for would be great.

                  1. rcallner RE: tastycakes Jul 2, 2010 10:24 AM

                    Mix it into fruit pies

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