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Beehive Market - Berkeley (Saturdays)

http://thebeehivemarket.com/

Opens on the 12th. Just noticed the sign today.

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  1. I hope people will report back on this. Anyone going?

    1 Reply
    1. re: Glencora

      Lots of space few booths. Frog Hollow and McEvoy present. Several prepared food providers I haven't seen before at the downtown or Temescal markets with taco truck with $4 tacos and booth with gumbo and veggie paella. Some breads, honey, crafts, and ice cream. Just did a quick walk through to get an idea and some sun. The wind was blowing some of the booths around. Some parking at the north side Virginia street entry.

    2. It is still pretty small but this market has great potential and lots of room to expand. Prepared food (tacos, cupcakes, ice cream and hey...paella!) a few fruit vendors and some craft booths. A band is playing in the sunny breeze. Just a few shoppers. The beehive market is off to a great start!

      1. Sounds kind of like the Underground Market in SF. The copy at the top of the Web site verges on self-parody.

        1. I walked through around noon. Two places to buy cupcakes, two selling coffee, some bread, a couple places selling cherries and other stone fruit, almonds. People were eating sausages. Nothing looked amazing to me. The pots made out of old tires were interesting.

          1. I'm disappointed at the trend away from what I consider to be the backbone of a farmer's market: a diversity of fresh seasonal produce. In total I saw 2 stalls selling unaffordable specialty fruit, and the rest was prepared foods (including the nationwide nitrite-filled brand Aidells sausage)...

            6 Replies
            1. re: WildNeighborhoodGardens

              Yes, the fruit was out of my price range, too. However, it doesn't call itself a farmers' market. I ended up walking farther down San Pablo to Casa Latina.

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              Casa Latina
              1805 San Pablo Ave, Berkeley, CA

              1. re: Glencora

                The gumbo/paella guy was Daniel Isberg, the "Free-Range Dining" chef. The gumbo was exceptional. I went back later for jerk-chicken tacos, but they'd run out. Luckily, CupKates was there, too. This place is not quite a farmer's market, not quite a crafts fair, kind of an odd duck.

                1. re: ernie in berkeley

                  That was my impression as well (I just happened to be driving by and stopped to check it out). My impression is that the intent is to have a market where people can sell hand-made stuff, but with a food, rather than handicraft, bent. The problem is that it's hard to get something like this off the ground, which is why they used some established vendors as anchors.

              2. re: WildNeighborhoodGardens

                I was also disappointed at the lack of produce, since the postcards they distributed in the surrounding neighborhoods had "local organic produce" first in the list of features. I did buy a large head of lettuce from McEvoy Ranch ($2.50, which sounds a little pricey but it probably weighed about two pounds). When we arrived around 1:15, it seemed sort of desolate, a perception probably enhanced by the large amount of space and small number of customers. I thought maybe we had just arrived too late in the day, but the woman at the McEvoy stand said it was like that all day. But, it is only the first day--hopefully they will attract more customers and more vendors in the coming weeks. They did have a Scream sorbet stand--the pistachio was outstanding, with a nice amount of sea salt to enhance the nuttiness, and the aprium tasted more on the apricot side, very fruity with a little tartness and not too much sugar. I would come back every week just for the sorbet, which isn't sold at the downtown Berkeley market, I think. Plus, this is a much shorter walk for me. I hope the produce selection improves.

                1. re: Leadbelly

                  Attracting produce vendors and produce shoppers to a market taking place two miles from and at the same time as the well-established and popular Saturday Berkeley farmers market seems like a tough proposition.

                  1. re: Leadbelly

                    I was there at 11-something. Fairly quiet, and quite windy. I had a small plate of the gumbo, which I thought was tasty. Two "closed up retail shops" were there - the Cafe St. Honore guy, and the Tofu place. I got a cupcake to go (from the van) and do not know yet how it is. 2 ice cream vendors. A chocolate vendor who had melted samples at 11. I got my free cup of coffee at the place by the entrance (Sling) - it was a nice cup, and they are opening a retail space where the Two Mile Winery used to be on San Pablo. I seriously hope some more fruits and vegetables show up.

                    The space is great for a lot more vendors, without any sort of crowded feeling.

                2. I showed up seeking Marin Sun Farms, SOL Catering, and Primos Parilla - all of which were advertised on the website as vendors, but none were there. The other lunch options weren't enticing, so I ate elsewhere. If they can get those three vendors to show, it will be a great option for good pastured meat and interesting lunch, neither of which are offered at the Saturday Berkeley FM. Scream Sorbet is great, but I didn't want to eat sorbet on an empty stomach.

                  The vendor list makes it clear that this is not a produce-centric market.

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                  Scream Sorbet
                  5030 Telegraph Ave, Oakland, CA

                  3 Replies
                  1. re: Morton the Mousse

                    Highland Hills' meat is pastured.

                    http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article...

                    1. re: Robert Lauriston

                      Note the qualifier - *good* pastured meat.

                      1. re: Morton the Mousse

                        I've had some good meat from Highland Hills. I might take issue with the way they cut it sometimes.

                  2. I stopped by today, and got a loaf of bread from the bread vendor (The Bread Project, I think). I got the buttermilk honey loaf, and that's some seriously good bread -- a classic American loaf, but really delicious and flavorful, with a perfect crumb. $3 a loaf. I'd never heard of this place before, but now I can't wait to try some of their other products.

                    1 Reply
                    1. re: JasmineG

                      Did they close down already? We tried to go a couple of weeks ago, and there was no one there, and the website is kaput. :(