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Need new ideas for chuck roast

Every time chuck roast goes on sale, I feel compelled to buy one. I always end up making the usuals - chili and pot roast. Sometimes I'll make shredded beef for tacos, but I'm really bored with it. Does anyone have any new ideas for a chuck roast?

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  1. When I buy 7-bone chuck, I grind it. Makes THE best burgers. We no longer order burgers in restaurants.

    1 Reply
    1. re: c oliver

      i usually avoid the 7 bone steak but someone gave me a high quality grass fed one and it was very good.

      chuck is fatty for jerky so best keep it frozen or in fridge as it doesn't keep that well..

    2. It makes really great Sloppy Joe's (instead of using hamburger). Or, if you have a smoker, make jerkey.

      1. i use chuck roast for beef burgoione (sic)

        1. Unless you want to grind it, your going to have to braise it. That means a stew or a pot roast. I suggest you look for a new variation in braising. You could go mexican with barbacoa or Teriyaki. I saw a short rib recipe with a teriyaki sauce. You could go barbecue by smoking it or even braising in bbq sauce.

          1 Reply
          1. re: tonka11_99

            I love Italian pot roast with mushrooms and tomato.

          2. You can also make beef stroganoff, creamed chipped beef on toast, beef fajitas, beef pot pies, a beef and noodle stew, vegetable beef soup, mix shredded beef with rice and stuff some red/green peppers and/or stuffed tomato's or an apple juice chuck roast
            http://www.dianaskitchen.com/page/mea...

            1 Reply
            1. re: boyzoma

              I'll pass on the creamed chipped beef, but everything else sounds good :)

            2. Mole. You can make is as simple or complicated as you like; the beefy flavor from a braise adds complexity either way. You can google for mole recipes, adapt from there. Here's a quick (sort of - at least as far as active time) basic recipe:

              Brown the chuck roast in a dutch oven. Remove, then fry up some onion in the pan, then some garlic. Meanwhile, toast then rehydrate in plenty of hot water (or chicken stock) a mix of dried chile peppers. Dump in a blender with the onion, garlic, a can of tomatoes, a handful of oregano and thyme, a little cinnamon, cumin, pepper, salt, a handful of sesame seeds and almonds. Blend to a smooth paste. Add water if necessary: this is a braising liquid, you can reduce it later.

              Put meat back in dutch oven, dump liquid in, braise for hours at 250 till tender (I do it overnight). Remove meat, pour liquid into a container, and refrigerate. When it's cold, scrape off the layer of solid fat.

              Before dinner, pour sauce into saucepan, bring to a soft boil to reduce. Add an ounce of unsweetened chocolate, some lemon juice, and if you want a brighter hot pepper flavor, some minced fresh chile peppers. When sauce has reduced, put meat back in dutch oven (or roasting pan), pour some of sauce over, and reheat meat gently. Then serve with rest of sauce.

              1. If you like Indian food, chuck roast (trimmed) makes for wonderful, tender beef curry. Here's a good one for rogan josh by Mahdur Jaffery:
                http://onceuponafeast.blogspot.com/20...

                1. Ar first I had good results turning chuck roast into ground beef in my Cuisinart, since I don't have a grinder. Then I came upon stringy gristle. So now I ask the supermarket butcher to grind it for me. At the sale price, it makes far better burgers than their higher-priced pre-ground stuff. I know there's a question as to whether supermarket grinders are cleaned well enough between meats and uses, but so far so good. I make rare burgers but not steak tartare.

                  1. This Vietnamese braised beef ....Beef Stewed with Tomato, Star Anise, and Lemongrass (Bo Kho).....is a wonderful dish using chuck roast. Love all of the recipes I've tried from "Into the Vietnamese Kitchen"!

                    http://www.culinate.com/content/3383/...

                    1. OK, Kris...now bear with me...the chuck roast I can get at Publix is sort of flat, 1-inch maybe 1 1/2 inches max thickness...I usually choose WITH the bone...and somewhat squarish...is that like yours too? If so, and IF you love cilantro, you might try this one from Epicurious...it calls for steak but I have successfully pulled this off with a chuck roast as described above...you need to marinate it for at least 8 hours...and grill it...use that sauce and you are in heaven (well, IF you love cilantro!)...just offering this out to you for a very different chuck roast:
                      http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/foo...

                      1 Reply
                      1. re: Val

                        I make an Italian or Asian marinade and have successfully grilled pot roast as well. The new "cut" flat iron steak is actually top chuck blade steak that my mother knew about years ago as flavorful and cheap. The trouble today is that flat iron has been "discovered" and what used to sell for $2.99/lb now goes for $6.99/lb.

                      2. How about making Italian Beef? Delicious! Lots of recipes around for shredded Italian beef. My husband really likes Pioneer Woman's recipe which calls for chuck roast, Italian seasoning, beef broth, and pepperoncinis w/ their vinegar. I thought I'd hate it, but it is quite addicting.

                        1. Chicken Fried Steak or Salisbury Steak.

                          1. A 7 bone roast is one of the most flavorful cuts of the chuck. Braise it, smoke it or grind it

                            1. This one's good.

                              http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Round-St...

                              1. We recently bought some very thin 7-bone chuck steaks. We smoked them for about 40 minutes and then quickly seared (still rare) in CI skillet. They were GREAT!

                                1 Reply
                                1. re: c oliver

                                  I love it grilled for a crowd. I beat it up with my meat hammer. dry rub, coffee grounds, slivered garlic. Way better than a tri-tip IMHO.

                                   
                                2. If it's a "chuck eye", I'd try roasting it as an ordinary dry roast, as opposed to a pot roast (the term "pot roast" is a bit of a misnomer; it's really a form of braising). It comes out splendidly as long as you do it at a low temperature (perhaps after an initial sear)

                                  Otherwise, a trio of English classics are particularly warming at this time of year:

                                  Steak and Kidney Pudding
                                  Steak and Kidney Pie
                                  Beef stew with Dumplings

                                  If you're not keen on kidneys you don't absolutely have to have them in the puddings and pies, although they add an enormous richness. Mushrooms may be added to either too. There are numerous variations.

                                  And speaking of which, when it comes to stews, chuck is the king of joints for almost any stew. The English variety usually calls for celery, carrots, onions and the aforementioned dumplings, and a bay leaf, but your options when it comes to stewing are almost infinite. That's the way to add variety from a chuck roast.

                                  1. My favorite way to cook it is mamachef beer roast ....beer, onions and the roast....yum

                                    5 Replies
                                    1. re: LaLa

                                      More commonly known as "Carbonade."

                                      http://www.saveur.com/article/Recipes...

                                      A few more than those three ingredients :)

                                      1. re: c oliver

                                        No in my house it is mamachef's beer roast and it is those three ingredients plus salt and pepper...if I was making "carbonade" I would have said that......

                                        1. re: LaLa

                                          To each her own. I just love the deeply flavored carbonnade.

                                          1. re: c oliver

                                            I see this site as offering information and learning about things, not previously known. I've braised with beer in the past and have enjoyed the dishes, but I am not a fan of well-done braised beef. I think I'll substitute a pork butt and give the Saveur recipe a try. Thanks for the link....but then, it seems very similar to Lidia Bastianich's recipe for Pork Shoulder Salsa Genovese....

                                            http://www.lidiasitaly.com/recipes/de...

                                            1. re: fourunder

                                              I like the idea of pork as I also am not terribly keen on braised beef. Thanks for that link. Sounds really good.

                                    2. Make Japanese-style curry stew. Go easy on yourself and use a boxed curry roux. My personal favorites in order of preference are Torokeru, Kokumaru, Vermont, then SB Golden brand. I do potato, carrots, and lots of caramelized onions. Serve with steamed rice, and fukijinzuke. Comfort food for this cold weather.

                                      1. braise it in teriyaki sauce (homemade or otherwise, I won't judge) in the crock pot, serve over rice with plenty of the beefy cooking liquid.

                                        1. Why not marinate and slow cook it on the grill.

                                          1. Make Philly Cheesesteaks or a Chinese stir fry (example - orange beef)
                                            Slice your roast in very thin slices with a sharp knife.To be able to cut the beef into super thin pieces, you are going to want to freeze the meat first, about a full hour before you work with it. Freezing the meat helps firm it up so that slicing it thinly will be a more do-able task.