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Trinity (Clapham) [London]

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helen b May 1, 2010 04:13 AM

Dining there in 10 days, for the first time. Just looked online at the menu and for the first time in yonks actually want to eat everything...any top tips from the ALC?

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    gembellina Apr 8, 2011 01:43 AM

    I had my birthday dinner here last night and it was just fabulous. It knocks Chez Bruce, which I would consider to be the only other contender nearby, into a cocked hat. I thought the menu was imaginative and inventive, and perfectly executed. The seabass with mussels and clams, seaweed two ways, and burnt cucumber puree was one of the best and most unusual dishes I've eaten in a long time, and was so fresh and salty and seaweedy that it felt like the sea on a plate. The service was wonderful - agree about the australian giant - and the place was packed all night.

    The only slight jarring note was that they were trying to push the chef's book, which was brought over to our table and left for us to browse, and the waiter tried a bit of the hard sell when he came back to collect it. Not enough to make us feel uncomfortable or particularly pressured, but slighty lacking in the class and grace evident everywhere else in the restaurant.

    3 Replies
    1. re: gembellina
      deansa Apr 10, 2011 03:50 PM

      I was there the day after you, gembellina. Oddly they didn't even mention the chef's book to us. Probably gave up on my table as a lost cause!

      It was my first time with the pigs trotter, and I thought it was wonderful, an excellent combination of flavours. The lamb saddle was also very nice. Only downside for me was one of the accompaniments to the lamb – one in particular (not sure its name) was particularly oily. Though not sure what it actually was, so whether it was supposed to be like this!

      1. re: deansa
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        gembellina Apr 11, 2011 01:43 AM

        Our lamb came with a sweetbread and a lamb pastilla with an anchovy fillet - very rich but not that oily. Maybe yours had other bits if it was a full main course rather than the tasting menu version.

        I wished the trotters had been on the tasting menu!

        1. re: gembellina
          deansa Apr 11, 2011 02:59 AM

          Yes that's it, it was the lamb pastilla. Rested my knife on it, and pools of oil started flowing out of the filo pastry onto the plate! On the other hand, it was quite tasty.

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      helen b May 16, 2010 06:01 AM

      Twas brillig, by the way. Pigs trotter on toast with the most amazing perfectly rectangular about a foot long (I may exaggerate) crackling, beautifully cooked salt marsh lamb (are we allowed any other kind in this country now?) with sweetbreads and tongue (didn't like the tongue too much, but that's just me). Charming but expert service, lovely meringues to take home...the locals are jolly lucky.

      3 Replies
      1. re: helen b
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        DollyDagger May 17, 2010 04:48 AM

        Must visit soon - have only heard good things. (FYI, chef Adam Byatt's cookbook, How To Eat In, is excellent - well worth a look).

        1. re: DollyDagger
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          helen b May 18, 2010 02:26 PM

          You should. One of the loveliest all round restaurant experiences I've had in a while. Make sure you get the very tall, bearded, aussie waiter - he was ace. Really looked after us.

        2. re: helen b
          limster May 18, 2010 02:35 PM

          Love the trotter on toast too. The crackling was really about a foot long, a clever but sensible and tasty presentation (just the right amount to have with the rest of the dish). Very balanced dish, apparently been on the menu for a long time. The trotters were rich and a little tomatoey iirc, with the sauce gribiche making a good acidic counterpoint, enriched by quails egg and a mustardy mayonaise.

          I also loved the tenderness of the rabbit loin, contrasting with moist fibres of braised rabbit with chanterelles. Incredible fig puree with an airy fig fragrance, reinforced by roasted figs, both serving a fruity contrast to the rich braise and a dark sticky glossy sauce (wine reduction? demi glace?). Rounded off with crunchy pistachio for a nutty angle to balance the meat and fruit.

          Similarly wonderful fig flavour in the fig ice cream that accompanied a dense and intense chocolate hot pot.

          The amibitions in the food are in perfect sync with the abilities of the kitchen. Great execution without obvious flaws.

          BTW, tasting menus there are £38 iirc, which are a good deal.

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