HOME > Chowhound > Home Cooking >

Help! Someone gave me a Perdue Roaster!

s
susanpmccoy Apr 2, 2010 07:52 AM

I dislike the taste of his chickens but I have to cook this thing up because they want me to bring it on Sunday since "my chickens are always so good." My chicken recipe is similar to Keller's but I usually make it with Bell & Evans 3.5-4 lbs -not Perdue (shudder!)
What can I do to make it taste good??

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
  1. j
    jeremyn RE: susanpmccoy Apr 2, 2010 08:00 AM

    The same thing you usually do. The difference will be very subtle. Or, I should say, the difference would be subtle if you tasted them blind.

    4 Replies
    1. re: jeremyn
      s
      susanpmccoy RE: jeremyn Apr 2, 2010 08:06 AM

      Do you really think so? I can always tell the difference-I don't think it is very subtle....maybe my taste buds are more discerning:-)
      Do you think brining it would cut down on that "subtle" taste??

      1. re: susanpmccoy
        j
        jeremyn RE: susanpmccoy Apr 2, 2010 09:27 AM

        You probably do have more discerning taste buds than your guests...and me. However, your preconceptions are probably affecting your taste. Do a blind taste test -- there's a decent chance you'll be able to tell them apart. But you'll doubt yourself, proving that the difference is indeed subtle. And your guests will NOT be able to tell the difference.

        If they like your Bell & Evans chicken, they'll like your Perdue chicken. And if you go in with an open mind, you'll like it too.

        One of the "subtle" differences is that the Perdue chicken will be slightly leaner. So yes, I believe that brining is a good idea.

        Man, I should really start less sentences with conjunctions.

        1. re: jeremyn
          s
          susanpmccoy RE: jeremyn Apr 2, 2010 11:03 AM

          Thanks, everyone! Will go ahead and treat it like my ordinary chickens. Will report back if anyone makes a comment.
          PS. Jeremyn, I think conjunctions were made to be used:-)

        2. re: susanpmccoy
          s
          susanl143 RE: susanpmccoy Apr 2, 2010 11:45 AM

          I find that Perdue chicken makes me feel slightly nauseated. I just avoid them these days. I don't think the taste difference between them and other brands of chicken is subtle at all. A Bell and Evans chicken would, besides having a different taste also have a firmer texture. I fear if you brine the already mushy textured Perdue roaster, you'll end up with an even mushier chicken than that with which you began.
          l

      2. l
        Liz K RE: susanpmccoy Apr 2, 2010 09:28 AM

        I'd do it the same way you usually do. If they say it doesn't taste as good as usual, you'll prove your point. If not, eh, it's only one meall!

        1. ChefJune RE: susanpmccoy Apr 2, 2010 11:40 AM

          I wouldn't be cooking it at all, since I wouldn't eat nor serve one of those. I am not sure whether I would just chuck it and buy my usual free-range hormone free chicken, or whether I would give it to a food pantry. Those things are full of toxins. Ugh.

          4 Replies
          1. re: ChefJune
            alanbarnes RE: ChefJune Apr 2, 2010 02:52 PM

            >>"Those things are full of toxins. Ugh."<<

            Really? Can you name a single toxin that's present in a Perdue chicken that isn't in your "usual free-range hormone free chicken"?

            It sure isn't hormones. All poultry sold in the US is hormone-free, and has been for years. And "free range" just means that the chicken has had "access to the outdoors." "The outdoors" can be a 12x12 concrete slab, and there's no requirement that the access be continually available. If you can explain how the possibility of going outside for a day or two of its life miraculously eliminates toxins from a chicken's flesh, you'll have the beginnings of a really ground-breaking research paper.

            I disagree with much of the factory farming that's done in the US. It's wasteful, environmentally unsound, and unnecessarily hard on the animals. I also disagree with deceptive marketing, and consider sticking labels like "free range" and "hormone free" on factory-farmed meat to be deceptive. But your claim that Perdue chickens are "full of toxins" is simply false.

            1. re: alanbarnes
              c oliver RE: alanbarnes Apr 2, 2010 03:35 PM

              But, hey, that toxin-laden chicken is good enough for those who depend on food pantries?

              1. re: c oliver
                jfood RE: c oliver Apr 2, 2010 03:50 PM

                at $0.99/# sometimes, they have hit jfood's dinner table for sunday family more than once. And noone EVER complained.

              2. re: alanbarnes
                j
                jeremyn RE: alanbarnes Apr 2, 2010 06:53 PM

                Thank you for that dose of sanity.

            2. greygarious RE: susanpmccoy Apr 2, 2010 11:44 AM

              If you brine it, add garlic powder or garlic juice to the brine. I am not sure if pre-brined Perdue chickens are still sold but a few years ago a local market sold them and the roasted garlic flavor ones were quite tasty. I've sworn off plain Perdue roasters after the last two had no more flavor than chicken which has been simmering in a stockpot for hours.

              1. jfood RE: susanpmccoy Apr 2, 2010 01:11 PM

                Take a deep breath, it is not that bad.

                Throw some fresh herbs under the skin, some garlic, S&P and paprika (smoked if you have it) place in a 350 oven for abou 18 minutes per pound.

                www.ctbites.com

                1. Veggo RE: susanpmccoy Apr 2, 2010 03:22 PM

                  Wow, a rough crowd here bashing the' tough man' who made a' tender chicken'! I buy Perdue oven stuffers for my 'Lincoln log chicken' , inspired by Sam. Never a complaint.
                  I attended a business seminar in the 70's with Frank Perdue -he was a student but he should have been the instructor. His anecdotes about finding the right music to make chickens happy -from reggae to classical - were not just hysterical, but demonstrated his intense interest in delivering a quality essential mass market food commodity at a fair price.

                  2 Replies
                  1. re: Veggo
                    alanbarnes RE: Veggo Apr 2, 2010 03:33 PM

                    If he'd been focused on delivering a quality essential mass market food commodity at an inflated price, the folks here would be happier!

                    1. re: alanbarnes
                      Veggo RE: alanbarnes Apr 2, 2010 03:54 PM

                      Alan, I think you are right again. Skip the tender chickens here and sell the hell out of the Three Tenors chickens at twice the price.

                  2. SweetPea914 RE: susanpmccoy Apr 2, 2010 07:43 PM

                    Interesting...I pretty much only buy Perdue since Consumer reports tested
                    "fresh, whole broilers bought at stores nationwide, two-thirds harbored salmonella and/or campylobacter, the leading bacterial causes of foodborne disease"... Perdue tested as the "cleanest" birds...

                    http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/ma...
                    Cook the bird the way you normally would, I'm sure it will be fine.

                    Show Hidden Posts