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Where to find White Whole Wheat Flour in Toronto (West)

I'm wondering if white whole wheat flour is available in Toronto at all? King Arthur in the states sells it, http://www.kingarthurflour.com/flours....

Has anyone seen it here? West end Toronto / Mississauga is preferred.

Thanks!

Kat

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  1. I haven't found it in Toronto but I did buy some across the border at Tops Supermarket.

    1. I haven't found white whole wheat flour in Toronto.

      As an aside most of the commercial whole wheat flour you buy has already gone rancid by the time you use it. After wheat has been ground, natural wheat-germ oil becomes rancid at about the same rate that milk becomes sour. So if the flour hasn't been refrigerated after being milled, the real shelf life is only a few days after it has been ground. But, as few people have access to freshly milled wheat anymore, most people don't know what it can taste like. Some of the artisinal bakers in Toronto get regular shipments of whole wheat flour right after it has been milled and they use it right away. And, stone ground is preferred over steel roller ground. A few bakers have their own mills.

      I ended up buying a Komo Magic Grain Mill from the US (countertop, $400) and I just grind my own wheatberries to make flour any time I need it and that's how I get flour of any type - hard winter red, hard spring red, hard winter white, hard spring white, soft winter red or soft spring white. I especially like the red fife wheatberries, an artisinal wheat recently resurrected after being the most popular wheat in Canada in the early 1900's.

      I know, more information that you needed to know!

      4 Replies
      1. re: Flexitarian

        Actually your reply is very informative. I have been buying very small quantities of commercial whole wheat flour to try to avoid rancidity but would be interested in trying freshly-ground flour. Where do you get wheatberries in Toronto? And can I find a less expensive grain mill that will do the job well enough?

        1. re: Chatty Cathy

          A few other points I forgot to mention. Stone ground is preferred over steel roller ground because the high temperature of the steel roller mills is thought to destroy a lot of the nutrients in the wheat. Stone ground is ground at a much lower temperature, but the requirements for high volume necessitate that commercial flour be ground this way.

          I buy my wheat berries at The Big Carrot on the Danforth. I get the Red Fife ones at the farmers markets listed in Toronto at http://tfmn.ca/?page_id=2. Most of the bakers there will sell wheat berries. And the berries will last for up to 2 years. Some farms will sell 50 lb bags or larger and on this basis the wheatberries are very inexpensive. But, for me it's more about convenience, versatility of what I can grind (buckwheat and other grains too), taste, nutrients and freshness than anything else. Plus, of course, amazing my friends by milling my own flour!

          I did a lot of research last year into grain mills and found that the Komo was the best combination of value and quality. They seem to just last and last. I bought mine from the US. I'd just do some googling and you'll find lots of info on mills.

          1. re: Flexitarian

            Wow, that's fantastic information! That's definately going on my list of things to look into when my kitchen is larger. Thanks!

            1. re: Flexitarian

              Bulk Barn has wheat berries. They are reasonable at $1/LB
              The protein content is 14%, higher than their hard white by 2%.

              How is the Vita Mix for grinding whole wheat flour at home?

        2. Was there ever an answer to this question...where to find white whole wheat flour in Toronto, or Canada for that matter?

          3 Replies
          1. re: jackie999

            I know this thread is from years ago, but I'd like to know if you ever got an answer. Its 2014 and I still can't find where to buy www flour in the GTA.
            Thanks.

            1. re: jackie999

              I believe Tyrone Mill in Durham region sells stone ground whole wheat flour, nice place for a day trip!

              1. re: popopo

                No, they don't sell White WW flour. In fact a lot of their stock comes from Grain Enterprise Mills (who supply bulk barn)

            2. Industrially I have used it in packaged food products, and the best stuff (freshest and most uniformly milled) had to be imported from the US. This was important to me, cause the application was for pastry. There are several local mills processing white whole wheat flour, but the consistency of the grind is not very great.....lets see if I can pick my baby brain and sleuth around the net to get you some contacts.

              3 Replies
              1. re: jnine

                So, from my research, Ultragrain is the best quality White Whole Wheat Flour. Great for making flaky pastry and leavened bread.

                http://www.ultragrain.com/where_to_fi...

                Looks like you can order 5LB bags online. Not sure if they'll ship to Canada, call/e-mail to ask.
                http://www.mysecretpantry.com/searchp...

                Locally, Hayhoe Mills was processing white whole wheat, but the factory burnt down in 2008.

                Also New Life Mills had it.. They are industrial suppliers, so you could call to see where they distribute (prob bulk to health food stores).

                http://www.newlifemills.com/FlourProd...

                Bob's Red Mill has some on their website...though I can't recall ever seeing it at Fiesta Farms or Whole Foods. You might be able to order it through their website, or call around to local grocery and health food stores to see if they stock it, or will order it for you.

                http://www.bobsredmill.com/org.-hard-...

                -----
                Fiesta Farms
                200 Christie St, Toronto, ON M6G, CA

                1. re: jnine

                  So, Bob's will ship to Canada. I would suggest this. As Flexitarian mentioned, this flour is subject to rancidity...it only takes a few months post-processing for any whole wheat flour to go off. You have no idea how long something like white whole wheat flour has been sitting on the shelf. If you order directly from the mill, then the flour will be fresher, and last longer.

                  My personal pet peeve is when I buy a Bob's product and its already rancid. There have too many skus, not a high enough turnover, and the packaging design invites oxidative rancidity. Light + oxygen + heat = rancid fat. It is the germ part of the grain that contains the healthy fats in a whole grain flour.

                  You can store your whole grains and whole grain flours in the freezer....especially the highly unsaturated fats like flax and ESP flax seed oil.

                  1. re: jnine

                    Any idea of shipping costs?

                    For those looking for white whole wheat flour, the link you gave is for the hard flour. Here is the Bob's Red Mill white whole wheat pastry flour.

                    http://www.bobsredmill.com/og-whole-w...

                    Hubby and I have purchased both in the States and use them for different purposes. We store them in the freezer and have had good luck with avoiding rancidity, so far.

                    Really hoping someone brings this stuff to Canada.

              2. I don't know if this will work, but Indian/Pakistani stores almost always carry whole wheat flour made from white winter wheat. Soft white winter wheat is usually labeled "maida", and its consistency is like pastry flour. Hard white winter wheat is labeled "atta", but sometimes atta is a blend of flours, so you have to check the label and/or ask the grocer for a brand that is strictly hard white winter wheat. Indian hard white whole wheat is not quite as hard as durum, so if you need something with a very high gluten content, it might not be suitable.

                1 Reply
                1. re: ninrn

                  Thank you for the information.