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Bar or Healthy Cookie for my One-Year Old Whose Molars are Coming in and He Won't Eat Anything!

b
brownie Mar 17, 2010 08:13 AM

Help! He's gotten pretty skinny--at his one-year checkup yesterday, the doctor called him a twig. Yes, he's crawling and walking and burning through calories, so I don't expect him to be a large fellow, but he's really not eating anything, except raisins and Mum Mums, and nursing. Still, I'd like him to have something with protein and calcium and fat beyond breastmilk, especially at such an active stage. So, I thought, maybe something crumbly like the Mum Mum, but with powdered milk, oats/oat bran, and some sort of fat (he's eaten hummous, so sesame seeds are OK). Any ideas out there?
Thanks in advance!
brownie

  1. Quine Mar 23, 2010 03:52 PM

    Why thing bars or cookies? Starting a 1 year old on a food habit of sweets? Try making meatballs, either fine minced beef or chicken, even shaping them into "hot dog" type shapes as finger foods. A whole grain pilaf, soft with a bit of chew. Small (non-choking sized) pieces of fruit that are well chilled, (soothing on those mean gums) like melon and grapes.
    Offer him hummus as a "dipping" sauce, even if he only sucks that off whatever he's dipping, he's still getting it down. Tiny but very frequent snacking of protein bits, like mozzarella cheese, or string cheese. he'd probably love making strings!

    1 Reply
    1. re: Quine
      j
      julesincoq Mar 23, 2010 04:02 PM

      Good point! My kids would eat anything as long as there was dip. Sometimes they dipped their meat in ketchup but sometimes it was plain yogurt, mayo, bbq sauce... just about anything. Fruit dipped in yogurt is good too.

      And while these are only his first set of teeth, damage can be done to these teeth before they even grow in. With enough decay they would have to be pulled and they can damage the permenant teeth in behind too. Gosh! Now I even sound like my dentist!

    2. f
      foiegras Mar 23, 2010 11:28 AM

      You might check out Maida Heatter for recipes you might like. She has some healthy cookies and bars ... some meant to be taken hiking, etc. with dried fruit. Since he likes raisins, what about other dried fruits like apricots? Maybe cut up to more the size of raisins?

      3 Replies
      1. re: foiegras
        r
        rainey Mar 23, 2010 01:04 PM

        The thing about toddlers walking around eating is you don't want anything that poses a choking hazard. I'd leave out whole fruits and nuts and go for purées and butters.

        1. re: foiegras
          j
          julesincoq Mar 23, 2010 01:50 PM

          As healthy as dried fruits can be I would leave them out entirely. Dried fruit is sticky and high in sugar....sooooo.... really really bad for your teeth. My dentist says raisins and other dried fruits are worse than candy because they stick to your teeth (or gums in this case) and stay there.

          Have you tried giving him frozen bananas? My kids loved them. Makes their hands cold though so they put it down pretty quick too. best eaten in a high chair.

          Or whole wheat banana muffins made with applesauce instead of the oil?

          1. re: julesincoq
            f
            foiegras Mar 23, 2010 03:31 PM

            He's going to lose these teeth anyway ... admittedly, I've never had a filling, so it's not something I worry about.

            What about overdone pasta, does he eat anything like that? You could make a homemade version of Spaghetti-os with lots of olive oil ... Most kids love mac & cheese.

        2. r
          rainey Mar 17, 2010 08:54 AM

          I guess I'd do a biscotti with white whole wheat flour. You could leave out any nuts or dried fruit called for. But you could also add powdered milk and puréed fruit plus rolled oats. Sugar, I think, is better than honey for toddlers but you could still cut back on the amount so as not to encourage a preference for sweet foods.

          The consistency you're going for is something like playdough. A little more wet and sticky is not a problem if you add fruit purée but you want a dough that will hold it's shape when you create the log for the first baking. And low temp convection helps dry them out both in the rope stage and in the second baking as biscotti.

          Personally, I'd skip adding extra fat. You're talking about one or two of these things a day, no? So I think the natural and digestible fat in breast milk and whatever meat is in your toddler's diet is enough for the first couple years. Besides, there is fat in the egg yolks of the eggs you'll use for biscotti.

          Here's a basic recipe to play with:

          Basic No Butter Biscotti

          • 1 1/2 cups + 3 tablesoons (350g) sugar
          • 2 1/2 cups (350g) flour
          • 1/2 teaspoon (3g) baking powder
            • 1 lemon zest
          • 3 large eggs

          Preheat convection oven to 320˚F.

          Stir up the sugar, flour, baking powder, and lemon zest in a large bowl.

          In a separate small bowl, whisk up the eggs. Add to the dry ingredients and stir and knead to combine. The dough will be very stiff like playdough. Knead in any additions like oats, dried fruit or nuts.

          Divide the dough in two. Roll each out on a floured board to a log about 1 1/2" in diameter. Place them a fair distance apart on a baking sheet fitted with parchment or a silicone mat.

          Wash each log with egg white and sprinkle with coarse sugar. Bake about 30 minutes or until they are golden brown and firm to the touch. Set aside to cool.

          Reduce oven temp to 300˚.

          When the logs have cooled, slice them with a serrated knife into pieces about a finger thick ( Probably thinner for a toddler but watch him/her anyway in case any large piece comes off before it's thoroughly softened). A bias cut is traditional but a straight cut will yield smaller cookies. A back and forth slicing will give better results than pushing down and mashing the log.

          Place them on a silicone or parchment lined baking sheet. Stand them on their flat bottoms and leave some space between them. There will be no more rising but you want air to circulate to dry them out. Bake them 9-12 minutes. Check to see if they are dried. If not return to oven for a few more minutes and/or leave them sitting in the oven cavity when the heat is turned off.

          1 Reply
          1. re: rainey
            b
            brownie Mar 23, 2010 07:28 AM

            great ideas, thank you so much! I will give them a try.

          2. j
            jvanderh Mar 17, 2010 08:40 AM

            Sounds like you need ghg's baked oatmeal:

            http://www.vintagevictuals.com/2009/0...

            Since you'll need to leave out the nuts, you'd probably want to decrease the liquid a little bit. You can also use cow's milk or evaporated milk rather than soymilk, if you prefer.

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