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PROBLEM WITH SOY MILK?!?!!!

a
alandy001 Mar 16, 2010 09:03 PM

ok. so i made this totally awsum pareve version of a New England Chowder. The problem i have however, is that all the soy milks i use are really sweet and rich, offsetting the fish taste. Is there a non-dairy alternative that is not soy milk that won't be overbearing in taste?

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  1. g
    GilaB Mar 16, 2010 09:10 PM

    Rice or oat milk? They're thinner than soy milk, although I haven't used them much in cooking.

    1. goodhealthgourmet Mar 16, 2010 09:15 PM

      try hemp or almond milk. or if you like coconut, you can use coconut milk or cream. i'm not a fan of rice milk for cooking - it's too watery.

      or forgo the milk alternative altogether, and thicken the chowder with a blond roux - you can use Earth Balance instead of butter...and maybe some potato puree or oatmeal for added thickness.

      1 Reply
      1. re: goodhealthgourmet
        a
        alandy001 Mar 16, 2010 09:22 PM

        therse an idea. i think i read that Rich's sells a non-dairy heavy cream. do you think that could work as well? or maybe use Rich's non-dairy creamer and just thicken it up w/ sum roux?

        if that dusnt wrk, cud i jsut offset the soy milk's sweetness with an additive of some sorts?

      2. queenscook Mar 16, 2010 09:33 PM

        Unsweetened Mimiccreme is not soy-based and has no sugar.

        4 Replies
        1. re: queenscook
          m
          mommysmazal Mar 16, 2010 09:44 PM

          What is Mimiccreme and where do you get it? Is it for Passover or year round or both? Thanks

          1. re: mommysmazal
            v
            vallevin Mar 16, 2010 10:14 PM

            If you are in the tri-state area you have to order through Amazon. It is not KLP, as far as I know. It's a non-dairy creamer, nut based.

            Per the chowder, I'll 2nd goodhealth's suggestion on the roux or potato option

            1. re: mommysmazal
              queenscook Mar 16, 2010 10:20 PM

              I don't know how to link to other threads, so the easiest way, I think, is for you to search on this board for the term "Mimiccreme" There are a number of references, but look at the specific thread called "Mimiccreme." Also, their website is mimiccreme.com, where you can get some recipes, nutritional info, etc. Essentially, it is a non-soy-based parve cream substitute. It is nut-based, so if there are allergies to nuts, do not use it. They have sweetened and unsweetened versions, but I've only used the unsweetened, so I know nothing of the other.

              I'm very pleased with the product for the parve ice creams I've made, and have not yet used it in savory applications, but others have (described in the thread I mentioned), and most people seem happy with it.

              To avoid the high shipping costs from the company itself, I have ordered it from Amazon, when I was ordering other stuff, so that I met the $25 SuperSaver free shipping deal. It is not certified for Passover, though.

              1. re: queenscook
                f
                ferret Mar 17, 2010 07:02 AM

                It''s a very good substitute for dairy in savory recipes. I used to use Rich's but it imparted a flat flavor into the recipe. Mimiccreme is somewhat "rounder" and more cream-like.

          2. j
            jdh11 Mar 17, 2010 06:56 AM

            There are unsweetened soymilks, including one by SILK that may do what you are looking for.

            6 Replies
            1. re: jdh11
              m
              mommysmazal Mar 17, 2010 08:01 PM

              Does SILK or anyone else for that matter make a soy milk that is pareve? All the ones I seem to find are dairy. Thanks

              1. re: mommysmazal
                queenscook Mar 17, 2010 08:26 PM

                EdenSoy and Trader Joe's' soymilks are parve. I don't know about other brands.

                1. re: queenscook
                  c
                  cheesecake17 Mar 18, 2010 11:37 AM

                  The Trader Joe's soymilk is great because it's shelf stable. I always have a container in my pantry. At one time, ShopRite had a parve refrigerated soymilk.

                  1. re: cheesecake17
                    d
                    DeisCane Mar 19, 2010 05:09 AM

                    Lots of the store brands are pareve.

                    1. re: DeisCane
                      c
                      cheesecake17 Mar 19, 2010 06:56 AM

                      Still though, I always take a look. At one point the Stop and Shop refrigerated soy milk didn't have a hechsher (the shelf stable one did). Another time, the ShopRite one was marked dairy equipment.

                2. re: mommysmazal
                  cherylp3 Mar 17, 2010 09:18 PM

                  Publix and Winn dixie offer pareve soymilks

              2. l
                lburrell Mar 17, 2010 09:10 AM

                It sounds as if you are using a vanilla flavored soy milk. There are many out there with no vanilla and no sweet flavor. Many of them are organic. Trader Joes has one and so would most health food stores. You could also try almond milk. It does not taste like almonds. Main thing is to check labels and be sure you're getting something without added flavors. Another alternative is to use a potato base. Easiest would be to get the potato buds and make them into a thickener. That's because pureeing potatoes is tricky. if you don't have enough water in them and puree to energetically, you get glue. Dried potato flakes are pretty fool proof.

                2 Replies
                1. re: lburrell
                  d
                  DeisCane Mar 17, 2010 09:51 AM

                  What kind of fish are you using?

                  1. re: lburrell
                    f
                    ferret Mar 17, 2010 09:53 AM

                    Almond milk is a milk substitute, Mimiccreme (also made from almonds as well as cashews) is intended to replace cream. There are differences in texture and viscosity.

                  2. j
                    J.e.m. Mar 26, 2010 10:50 AM

                    I had that happen once with macaroni and cheese. If you use unsweetened or original, anything not vanilla or sweet, you should be okay. I used almond milk this morning in pancakes, and they were great. I've used plain soymilk and plain almond milk in tuna noodle casserole (the mushroom soup) and it worked. Try Silk original or Eden original.
                    The completely unsweetened ones are sometimes bitter. You could try Silk non-dairy coffee creamer in plain; those are thick.

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