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Swine & Wine @ Little Savannah March 21st

Anyone going? I'll be there with bells on!

4:30 pm Sunday March 21st at Little Savannah Restaurant
Benefit for Jones Urban Farm
$45 advanced, $50 at the door

Clifton Hold & Chad Schofield of Little Savannah
Tom Robey of Veranda on Highland
Stephen Stryjewski of COCHON IN NOLA

Menu: (sorry for the all caps, its from a pdf file)

SPICY DEVILED FARM EGGS
FRIED PIG EARS, TABASCO AIOLI
ROASTED & RAW APALACHICOLA OYSTERS
WITH LEMON AND HOT SAUCE
TOM ROBEY’S BOUDIN BALLS
~~
SALAD
BABY LETTUCES & ROASTED BEET SALAD, WALNUTS,
GOAT CHEESE, LEMON VINAIGRETTE
~~
SUPPER
SLOW-ROASTED WHOLE PIGS
WHITE CHEDDAR MACARONI & CHEESE
BRAISED GREENS
NEW POTATO SALAD
BAKED BEANS
ROASTED PEPPER CHOW CHOW
~~
DESSERT
BANANA PUDDING
BACON & GOAT CHEESE BROWNIES
S’MORES BY THE FIRE

looks like a great event. Seems as though March-April will be full of swine and wine events (Cochon 555 in ATL is April 18th, another event not to be missed)

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  1. I think it's actually at Jones Valley Farm downtown? I am thinking of going. Here is more info:

    http://blog.al.com/bob-carlton/2010/0...

    http://www.littlesavannah.com/uploads...

    13 Replies
    1. re: Dax

      It is at Jones Valley downtown. I hope to be able to go. Price is pretty decent, and the combination of roast pig and Good People ale sounds like a perfect combination. You can't beat the combination of chefs, either. Cochon is a great restaurant.

      1. re: Big Daddy

        oops my bad.. Wel i'll be there for sure. I've been dying to go to Cochon in NOLA so this will be a treat. Pigs+Pinot+Good People=Win

        1. re: JBurnsPatersonIV

          Amen on that one. Supposed to be a nice day, too, although I hope those forcasted thunderstorms hold off.

          1. re: Big Daddy

            Got my ticket this morning. It will be fun to compare these pig ears to those at Chen's. Bacon/goat cheese brownies sounds intriguing, too. Hope I can get me some cheek meat.

        2. re: Big Daddy

          Due to weather, the location has changed to Old Car Heaven.

          1. re: Dax

            Be sure to give us the juicy details after the event! Sounds like a lot of fun, and good food to be had.

            1. re: Jannae

              Old Car Heaven was an interesting venue. As far as the event itself, I think it went very well and I would be interested in hearing about the final paid attendance. Saw the Holts and Robey in attendence but they were pretty busy.

              Good People provided two delicious options including their IPA and pale ale, which goes great with swine. Bidmingham Budweiser donated a Marzen which was maybe the best beer there, but I forget the brewer.

              Passed apps of fried pig ear with homemade hot sauce was crunchy, spicy and pure awesome (think chicharron/very crispy pork rind), deviled egg with bacon or pancetta was good and the boudin balls were tasty but lacked enough sausage for me although the crab was an interesting touch. Whole Foods also put out a bread and flavored butter table which was a hit.

              As far as the main course, well I was late to get into line and therefore waited in a long line for about 15 minutes or more. Beer in hand, no big deal. The pig itself was good, although some people are often turned off by the strong smoke/burnt smell (final skin can be a little black). The meat itself was good, as was the sauce which I think was the same hot sauce used on the pig ears. The cracklin kicked butt as it always does. Beans ehh (not done enough to my liking). Mac and cheese and greens were fantastic. Oysters were Apalachicola oysters, so egg.

              I'm not a big dessert guy but that banana pudding was delicious, albeit a bit soupier than I usually like. Still, it was great. The brownie with goat cheese and bacon was very rich and decadent, made even more ridiculous by the banana pudding I piled on top.

              Back home in food coma napping on the couch by 8 PM. Most of the staff was wearing Little Savannah shirts and they did a great job. I'll definitely return next year.

              1. re: Dax

                To sum it up in one (non)word: pigxquisite.

                Old Car Heaven is a very cool venue, a warehouse full of cars, mostly from the 30s through the early 60s, but a few more modern ones. There's a stage in the middle of the main room, where a fun country/bluegrass band played.
                The Good People IPA ran out early, but the pale ale lasted through dinner. The other beer was a Marzen from Gordon Biersch, a California based brewpub chain with breweries in Florida, Georgia and I think Tennessee. Nice malty contrast to the hoppy Good People.
                I loved those pig ears, all crunchy and spicy and piggy. Not like the ones at Chen's. Dax pointed out that it helped that the portions weren't a whole ear. I got real quiet at that point, because I ate at least an ear's worth last night, so much I'm sure the poor server throught I was a stalker.
                The eggs with a good contrast to the salty snacks -- fresh, free-range farm eggs always taste better. I was not enthralled at all by the boudin balls.
                But one of the hits for me was the charcuterie prepared by Don Link of Cochon of New Orleans, one of the volunteering restaurants. Both the proscuitto and the head cheese provided a guilty, fatty pleasure (especially since I did my best to be polite and help us consume something a lot of people avoided.) He also provided a cured pork tenderloin (sweet meat), a spicy pork tenderloin (like capicola), a dried sausage and a ham Chef Dan said was made in Kentucky. This was unbelievable stuff.
                Lines for food were long -- as Dax said about a beer's worth. I skipped the salad, but enjoyed a very tasty mac n cheese. The almost bland greens were welcome amid all the salty, smoky meat. Beans were undercooked, but the pork helped.
                The pig -- a little dry (and no sauce to moisten it), but it had great flavor and tasty bark (they broke off a tray with outer meat for bark lovers). And the roasted skin -- that alone may have been worth the price of admission.
                After all that -- despite a long walk around the car displays -- I couldn't think about dessert (even the bacon and goat cheese brownies).
                After telling my children later about all the pig ear I ate, they were disappointed I didn't eat eyeball or snout, too. I realized I never did see a head Sunday evening: Maybe those were saved for staff tacos.
                Definitely put this on your list for next year: At $45 (advance ticket; $50 at the door) it was well worth the money and much more affordable than many chef-driven fundraisers around town.

                1. re: Big Daddy

                  When I said it helped that the portions weren't a whole ear, I meant it helped some people (who otherwise might have been scared off by the offering) to try it because the pieces were less intimidating compared to a whole ear. I was definitely following around the cute little server with the tray of ears to the point where she definitely could have assumed I was stalking her.

                  One table also offered wine but I only tasted a sip of a fairly generic red.

                  There was a thick(er) red sauce sitting next to the pulled pork. I think it tasted like the spicy sauce served with the pig ears.

                  1. re: Dax

                    Yes it was a spicy sauce.
                    I got what you meant about the portion, more a reference to the heap o' ear slices at Chen's, and that the mosels circulating at Pig and People, I mean Swine and Wine were less intimidating. Just trying to set up a little joke at my expense. Glad I wasn't the only one regularly hunting down that woman.

                    1. re: Big Daddy

                      Oh, I see now what you meant about the sauce. (There was both a liquid and dry spicing for the ears.)
                      I saw that bottle by the pulled pork, but it looked like a commercial hot sauce bottle.

                      1. re: Big Daddy

                        The bottle I used was just a standard squeeze bottle. It clogged so we opened the top and dumped a little on our barbecue.

                        I think I also saw a commercially-labeled cochon bottle at some point in the day.

                        1. re: Dax

                          Sounds absolutely delightful! Next year, we'll have to be sure our schedule is open so we can attend.