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Pork tenderloin -- simple recipe ideas?

I've never prepared a pork tenderloin before, and in general, I rarely cook meat. So I need advice for what to do with a 2 lb. boneless pork tenderloin. I'd like to do something simple and somewhat spicy, in my dutch oven or roasting pan--I don't have a grill set up yet. What are your ideas? thanks!

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  1. i'd say just pick a flavor profile that suits you. chili and lime, ginger and orange, sauerkraut and caraway, apple and cinnamon. dredge the pork in flour and your spice of choice and citrus zest, if that's the flavor you choose, with salt and pepper. saute until browned. then finish by baking. you can make a pan sauce after you remove the meat to rest. just add a tablespoon each of flour and butter to your pan, stir and brown the flour and add liquid to loosen: chicken broth, orange or apple juice depending on what flavor you went with.

    tenderloin is pretty lean so be careful not to over cook. take it to 5-7 degrees underdone and let it finish while it rests.

    1. It's very easy to simply roast it alongside some vegetables and have the whole meal done in one pan.

      Like above, pick a flavor profile you like - pork is very lean and goes with most anything. I like to roast mine with quartered onions, potatoes, acorn or butternut squash and apples. Shallots, leeks and garlic with rosemary or thyme also works well. I usually brush the tenderloin with a glaze, like hoisin sauce or pomegranate molasses near the end of cooking to give it some color and flavor.

      Pan roasting is another good method, as appycamper described above. I also love to do a dry rub of brown sugar, salt, pepper, paprika, cumin & garlic powder, and sear on all sides (usually I do this on a grill, but you can use the broiler) baste it with a sauce of olive oil, fresh oj, honey, garlic & jalapenos, then cook indirectly for another 7-9 minutes, until done in the center. Serve with a mango salsa on the side. It's a very lean but versatile cut, don't overcook it, it should still be juicy and a little pink at the very center.

      4 Replies
      1. re: Phurstluv

        They are also very easy to slice into medallions, pound thin and fry up as cutlets, with or without breadcrumbs.

        1. re: Phurstluv

          Add some roasted garlic and roasted red peppers and you have a close approximation of solomo. Awesome on sandwiches.

          1. re: Phurstluv

            I am having fun going through the 2006-2008 Cook's Country annuals, which I bought on eBay for a total of not much more than it would have cost to renew the 2009 subscription I received as a gift.

            One recipe is for "Iowa Skinnies", which are pork cutlet sandwiches on soft buns, with lettuce, tomato, and mayo. Regardless of whether or not you bread (they used a combo of saltines and fresh bread, processed together, and a mayo/egg mixture to dip the floured cutlets), the basic numbers are worth remembering: a one-lb tenderloin sliced crosswise into 4 equal medallions, which are then pounded 1/4 inch thick (any thicker and the breading will burn before meat is cooked through), and sauteed in a little oil for 2 minutes per side.

            1. re: Phurstluv

              Yes, I highly recommend this, just pound it our, dredge in flour, lightly salt and pan fry in oil, makes a good sandwich or just plain.

          2. Do it the simple Italian way. Poke holes all over with a knife and stick fresh rosmary and slivers of garlic in the holes. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast at 350. For 2 lbs I'm guessing about an hour, but keep an eye on it so it is not all dried out.

            One you get your grill set up and if you have a rotiserrie, make it the same way except rub it all down with fleur de sel and cook it on the rotisserie. You will love it.

            1. You might check this link which also lists a lot of other links. The recipe I referred to from Sunset magazine is one of my favorites.
              http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/599936

              1. If you bought a 2# package you may find when you unwrap it that there are two small tenderloins. They are often only about 16-24 oz. Stud with slices of garlic, or marinate in your choice of marinade (e.g. Italian dressing or teriyaki sauce) anywhere from an hour to a day. Dry the meat. Sear all around in a pan that can go into the oven, then finish at 375 for 15 minutes (150-155 degrees). Remove to platter and cover loosely with a sheet of foil while you deglaze the pan with the marinade, and/or wine, broth, or juice to make a pan sauce. My usual marinade is 1/4 c each of diced onion, apple cider and teriyaki sauce, with 1/8 tsp each garlic powder, ground mustard, and ground savory. I use garlic powder because fresh garlic burns easily, and I scrape the bits of onion back into the marinade before searing.

                There are many, many suggestions if you search the board or just follow the links below this thread.