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lamb's head

m
markiank Feb 5, 2010 09:22 PM

was at my butcher today putting in an order for my super bowl wings and noticed him asking the woman ahead of me if she wanted the lamb's head along with the rest of her mean, she shook her head no and he tossed it.

i'm thinking that's free food right there for me, and there's got to be some good eats on the head & face.

any recs on some different ways to approach this?

muk

  1. coll Feb 6, 2010 01:12 AM

    Only thing I know is people who love it, fight over the eyeballs and claim that's the best part. Enough to make me not want to try it. The people I know that eat it do so with copious amounts of beer being drunk if that helps.

    1 Reply
    1. re: coll
      s
      scunge Feb 6, 2010 08:03 AM

      Capocella ................Roasted Lambs Head ..garlic and oregano salt pepper and lemon

    2. b
      Brandon Nelson Feb 6, 2010 10:10 PM

      Veal and beef cheeks are awesome. I don't suppose lamb cheeks would be less so.

      1 Reply
      1. re: Brandon Nelson
        Cheese Boy Feb 7, 2010 10:00 PM

        You hit the sweet spot. The cheek meat is what I prefer most and then the tongue. If anyone wants to fight over the brain and eyes, go right ahead. Not me.

      2. Axalady Feb 7, 2010 06:55 AM

        Many years ago I raised sheep. I had a Greek friend whose YaYa (Grandmother) was about 85 years old at the time. Every year they asked for a lambs head and my friend's YaYa would make an Easter soup. Unfortunately I wasn't very adventurous food wise at the time and I never ate it. Maybe lambs heads are good for you - my friend's YaYa lived to 102.

        3 Replies
        1. re: Axalady
          Cheese Boy Feb 7, 2010 10:09 PM

          A Caribbean place I frequently go to makes very good hearty soups. Chicken soup, beef soup, red pea soup, and lamb's head soup, are all in the rotation. The lamb's head soup is very good. It's served with small pieces of lamb on the bone and dumplings.

          1. re: Cheese Boy
            Axalady Feb 8, 2010 07:11 AM

            If I'm ever lucky enough to get an opportunity to try it again I won't turn it down!

            1. re: Axalady
              Cheese Boy Feb 23, 2010 01:30 PM

              I wasn't sure what this soup was called in Greek, but here it is ... !
              Apparently, it has alternate spellings too [Mageritsa and Magiritsa].

              Magheritisa --> http://kalofagas.ca/2008/05/03/magher...

        2. c
          ChiliDude Feb 7, 2010 10:36 AM

          My late father-in-law of Italian heritage traditionally would go to a Greek butcher for lamb's head around Easter. My late mother-in-law of the same heritage, but from a different Italian province, would prepare the head, but would not partake of it.

          I, not being of Italian heritage, would not crave that particular body part. It could, however, make an interesting stock for soups and stews.

          2 Replies
          1. re: ChiliDude
            o
            otps Feb 7, 2010 07:06 PM

            When I was in Iceland we enjoyed the best lamb I have ever had.
            My friend wanted to serve the lamb head, but decided not to because of the number of non Icelandic guests. Next time we visit I will demand lamb head.

            1. re: otps
              pitu Feb 8, 2010 04:57 AM

              One of my favorite things about Icelandic grocery stores is the lamb heads in the freezer case.

              I'm thinking you'd run into the gamey greasy issue that lamb ribs (and boiling lamb anything for stock) present, so be prepared. (I am otherwise a lamb enthusiast)

          2. w
            Whats_For_Dinner Feb 23, 2010 07:47 PM

            Interesting tales of lamb headcheese: http://charcuteriesundays.blogspot.co...

            But, yeah, if it were mine, I'd totally take advantage of the cheeks. The rest of it... would sure make a full-bodied soup!

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