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Great Braciole Recipe?

So my italian-american friend from brooklyn was regaling me with tales about the braciole her mom would make for her back home...I'd love to make some for her. Any great recipes out there?

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  1. Many markets have the thin slices of beef you need for rolling up. I make a bread stuffing with crushed croutons, a little minced onion, mixed Italian herbs, garlic, melted butter. S and P. Don't over fill. Place stuffing on each slice and roll, tieing in a couple of places with cooking string. Season the outside, dredge lightly in Wondra, brown in olive oil till nicely crusted. Then add your favorite Marinara sauce and simmer till tender. Good luck~

    1. Hi there!

      If you search recipes - you will find a zillion different versions.

      My mom used to put chopped garlic, Pecorino, proscuitto, and chopped parsley...
      I never liked moms too much because IMO it was too garlicky.... So later in life I took to
      soaking bread in milk, squeezing out the excess, adding lots of pecorino, raisins, pine nuts, parlsey and chopped hard cooked egg. I line the meat with proscuitto and then add the stuffing....this is my favorite version so far!
      Roll it up, fry it, add it to your gravy!
      (Make sure to have other meats in your gravy as well for flavor! (no Sunday gravy would have JUST braciole in it!)

      1. Funny you should ask. I was just over at my friend's on Saturday cooking braciole. In my part of the US, I don't think you can be an Italian-American in good standing without a kitchen in the basement where all the real cooking, like making braciole happens! In our case, the only standard with braciole is flank steak, pounded out thinly and then pan fried in a little oil after it's filled and tied. Then, it's dropped into the tomato sauce with the meatballs and sausage. The beauty is you can fill it with anything like Quill and Nelly. I think Quill has the idea with watching you don't overfill it or it will just deteriorate in the sauce.

        1. I would agree too much garlic can overwhelm the Braciole.... I like to make my Pork Braciole with a stick of Imported Provolone and Parmigianno Regiano , Minced Garlic, Chopped Fresh Italian Parsley and Pignoli Nuts....

          Two things my braciole never includes.....beef or raisins. ... always pork

          http://www.thatsmyhome.com/venettos/l...

          5 Replies
          1. re: fourunder

            Definitely pork, so much more tender than beef. But what cut do you use to make it, I always get it premade from the butcher, would love to try it myself. Is there an equivalent to flank steak?

            1. re: coll

              I don't know about four, but I buy a pork loin, slice it fairly thickly, 3/4 inch or so and pound it out; it gives you a nice size cutlet to work with. I guess you could use shoulder cutlets or pork tenderloin as well.

              I like to make a nice pesto with parsley, bread crumbs and pine nuts and use that as the stuffing, with aged Provolone and Pecorino. Roll, tie, season, brown and simmer in the gravy until tender.

              I'm with four on the no raisins rule, and I used to do beef but pork is better.

              Like NellyNel wrote, there's a zillion different versions. So the best one is the one you like.

              1. re: bushwickgirl

                OK, I have a loin and a tenderloin in the freezer so I will experiment next time I make sauce (still working on the one I made last weekend, so in a few weeks). I have some butcher twine too, but maybe I should get something thinner. Anyway, thanks for the info!

                1. re: bushwickgirl

                  B and C,

                  I prefer to use what's known as the sirloin roast, or meat from the shoulder butt or leg. I prefer the darker, more marbled meat over the leaner loin.

                  Generally, I also prefer to make larger rolls....3 inches in diameter and about 5 inches in length. The small ones are just a tease.

                  1. re: fourunder

                    Just eat more of them!
                    3 x 5, that's a gigantic braciole!
                    It's not so easy to get shoulder or leg cutlets in my nab, Even at a decent pork store, the braciole is usually already prepared. My local (Latino) butcher doesn't carry cutlets, just pork for stew from the shoulder. I use what I can get.
                    Actually, cutting the loin a little thicker and pounding it out gives me a good size cutlet.
                    Can't say much about the more marbled meat over leaner loin, though, the leg or shoulder is probably better flavor.

            2. I fill mine w/ fennel sausage, bread crumbs, sauteed onion and garlic, parsley and whatever else I think might go with it -
              I make sauce (not traditional marinara or gravy) - saute onion, carrot, celery (fennel), garlic - add tomato paste and cook, add red wine and deglaze, add tomatoes - add meat and cook for a while over very low heat, when you take the meat out you can blend the sauce if you want, I like the smoother texture - it also emulsifies a little and becomes slight creamy.

              1. Thanks for the suggestions! I think I'll give it a try this weekend! :o)

                1. My MIL's recipe: spread a flank steak or a thin round steak with soft bread crumbs, garlic, parsley, grated parmesan and raisins. Roll and tie with kitchen string. Brown the roll and then add to the tomato sauce ( which she called "gravy") you are simmering. Her gravy had braciole, meatballs and pork roast. She served the meats as a separate dish.

                  1. funny, I just saw Tyler F do one on FNetwork - looked fantastic with panko, garlic, parsley, mozzrella cheese chucks, roasted red pepper, hard boiled eggs - he used a flank steak as well:

                    http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ty...

                    1. Besides all the great fillings suggested, I lay a layer of greens (spinach, chard, kale, what have you) on top of the meat, lay the cheese and stuffing on the greens and then roll them up. Don't know if it's "traditional" or not but picked it up from the folks in the Italian-American community I used to live in.