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jasmine vs. basmati

What's the difference between jasmine rice and basmati? I went to the local supermarket and I saw loads of jasmine rice but only one section for basmati and it was all gone. What is the price difference?

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  1. Basmati is from India/Pakistan and is a great tasty rice. Jasmine is in theory from Thailand ,and is also nice, fragrant. Different rices, differenrtflavors. Basmati can be very expensive. However, in Queens, Richmond Hill etc.. you can geta 10 lb bag anywhere from $6.00 to $20.00.

    5 Replies
    1. re: MOREKASHA

      Morekasha, about the borough of Queens. A friend and I used to go there from Manhattan. We went to a part of Queens that has a lot of south asian influences. A lot of sweets stores and jewlery stores. It was nice. I kind of miss her and wanted to go there on my own again. What is the village's name? Is it Richmond Hill? I thought another area was Forest-something.

      1. re: chipsydipsy

        Jackson Heights is the famous area, 7 Trains to 74th St or E/F to Roosevelt Ave. The area I mentioned is Ozone Park + Richmond Hill. The main shopping area is under the Libery Ave El Train (A line to Lefferts), get off @ Lefferts (last stop). It's a mixed area, with lots of Indo Caribbeans, some Latins (Mex, Dominicans) the last of the Italians. You should also walk on Liberty to the west as well. You cant go wrong w/an El train, as least the view is always cool.

        1. re: MOREKASHA

          Thanks, morekasha. I will have to arrange a visit for the springtime. Are there some south asian restaurants that will put meat in their simosas just to please customers? I thought I had a simosa in Manhattan that had beef in it a while back. I just want to find out for sure.

          1. re: chipsydipsy

            I can't recall seeing too many meat filled samosas. Most I've seen are potato. We had a great Punjabi samosa place on Jamaica Ave a while back, but alas they've flown the coop.

            1. re: chipsydipsy

              Meat samosas are not an uncommon snack, though obviously vegetarian Hindus would stick to potato samosas. If you include the samsas and sambusak that are common throughout Central Asia and the Near East, meat as a filling is the rule, rather than the exception.

      2. In America I find that basmati is generally more expensive than the other varieties. I use basmati for Persian food and sticky rice for my normal usage.

        Basmati is longer than our white long grain. It is the normal rice of usage for Persian(Iranian) and Indian dishes.

        Jasmine is also known as Fragrant Thai rice and the name comes from the aroma.

        both basmati and jasmine take slightly less water than the other long grain whites

        basmati requires a little oil.

         
         
        1. In addition to all the above comments, basmati rice should be soak in cold water for about 20 minutes before using. This allow the rice to expand to it's characteristic long shape when cooked.

          1. Thanks guys...I did decide on Near East. Rice, it was on sale.

            1. I buy large bags of each (20 pounds or so) when I can. I use Basmati when I need fluffy rice, and Jasmine when stickier rice is what I desire. They are not interchangeable, from my perspective. I buy mine in Costco or Sams, and sometime I buy Jasmine or even CalRose in Asian markets, Prices do vary, but not so much that I would not buy one or the other if I was runnng out.

              2 Replies
              1. re: RGC1982

                More nonsense about how to cook Rice-especially Basmati-to be expected I suppose.

                I generally pay over $C1/pound for Basmati but buy only the very best.

                1. re: RGC1982

                  I am in Northern California - where I live basmati is a bit more expensive than California grown white but not enough to make a huge difference. All rice went up in price recently (some more than others) - corn tortillas and bread also.

                2. Basmati rice has a complex perfume and cooks up drier. Jasmine is fragrant, but more nutty and clumps together when cooked.

                  The two are not interchangeable. Basmati has a strong fragrance that will dominate unless paired with equally strong flavors as in South Asian cuisine. It can stand on its own as a biryani or pilaf. Jasmine, while still fragrant, is more delicate. It goes well with the heavily seasoned cuisines of Southeast Asia, though it is subtle enough to act as a side to simpler dishes.

                  1. Basmati has a slight "popcorn" aroma and flavor. Since finding Basmati, I don't buy "white" rice at all . . . and the Basmati, cooked with a touch of garlic and chicken bouillon makes a FABULOUS fried rice.

                    1 Reply
                    1. re: chowdawggy

                      I have to admit the Jasmine rice is my favorite, I love the smell while it's cooking.
                      I agree it has a lighter flavor and I use it with just about everything.