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Non-stick for induction?

Hello all!

I'm a new poster here (relatively longtime reader). We are moving into a new house with an induction cooktop and need to purchase all new cookware! After much reading, and with budget in mind, I ended up purchasing a number of Tramontina tri-ply pieces.

However, I'm now on the hunt for a pair of non-stick induction fry pans for eggs, etc. I definitely am looking for something budget, but I'm having a hard time finding something that is induction capable, and truly non-stick that doesn't cost a good bit of money. I'm hoping to find an 8"/10" set for $50 or so if possible. If that's just unreasonable, I'd be more than happy to listen to alternate recommendations!

Thanks,

Russell

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  1. If you have an ikea close to you, they have lots of induction compatible non-stick pans.

    1. Infinite Circulon is induction-capable. Swiss Diamond also has an induction-capable line.

      1. trpltongue: "I'm having a hard time finding something that is induction capable, and truly non-stick that doesn't cost a good bit of money."

        We have had an induction cooktop for over ten years. Every morning, seven days a week, I fry a couple of eggs, three if our dog asks me in the proper negotiated fashion to make one for him. Our "truly non-stick" pan for the purpose is a Griswold cast iron griddle, dating from circa 1940 that we purchased from eBay for <$20, including shipping. Although it probably was pretty well seasoned, we took it down to bare metal (self-cleaning cycle of the oven) and seasoned anew. As for how "truly" non-stick it is, I use an extraordinarily thin flexible stainless steel turner to flip the eggs or to remove them from the griddle. Almost always, when trying to slide the vey thin edge of the turner under an egg, I have to chase the egg across the griddle because the egg just slides away from the turner.

        For a pan the has had a special non-stick surface treatment, you may wish to read up on the Sitram Cybernox, which uses a "permanent" surface treatment that is much harder and more durable than Teflon or Silverstone -- you can use metal utensils with it -- as long as you banish from your home those green cloth Scotch-Brite style scrubber pads. As a pan, the Sitram is solidly made of top-notch materials and distributes heat very evenly. The Cybernox process is not a coating like Teflon or Silverstone, but a treatment to the upper layers of molecules of the interior surface of the pan itself. We tried one, did not like it, but, as we have absolutely abhorred the Teflon and Silverstone that we have tried, if you like pans with those coatings, your mileage may vary from ours with the Sitram Cybernox.

        4 Replies
        1. re: Politeness

          No scratching problems on your stove surface?

          1. re: Agent Orange

            Agent Orange: "No scratching problems on your stove surface?"

            None. Zero. Zilch, in ten years.

            Mind you, we very very rarely slide any pot or pan across the surface.

            And, if that is a concern on an induction cooktop, there is always the prophylactic of putting a sheet of parchment paper between the cooktop and the pot or pan. The heat that will be induced in the pan will "never" reach the ignition point pf parchment, and parchment does not have sufficient hardness to scratch a Ceran cooktop.

            1. re: Politeness

              I also haven't had any problems with scratching from cast iron pans. I almost always put down paper to cover the entire induction cooktop before I start cooking - in my experience, two layers of old newspaper works fine. When I'm done cooking, I crumple up the newspaper and use it to polish the glass of the cooktop. It seems to work a lot better than a damp cloth.

              1. re: Politeness

                Hey thanks. I had never thought about parchment paper before (or newspaper.) And all this time my cast iron pan has been asphyxiating in the cabinet. Seared scallops are in order tonight.

          2. I love my Scanpan induction ready non-stick, but it's more than quadruple what you want to pay ;)

            1. thanks for all the options! As most, I work quite a bit so end up doing a bunch of my "research" online and it's a bit difficult to know which pans are induction capable when searching online!

              Politeness
              I would love nothing more than to have the time and patience to properly care for cast iron as it is such a great tool to cook with, when properly cared for. However, I am 100% certain that there is no way my wife would make that commitment :) Our pans sometimes sit for hours or even overnight before being cleaned. They are always washed by hand, and if I do the cleaning they are dried immediately and put on the pot rack, but my wife is chasing around 2 kids as well as working from home so when she does the cleaning they get washed by hand and left to air dry. If there was such a thing as a maintenance free cast iron, I would buy stock in the company :)

              1 Reply
              1. re: trpltongue

                I hate the perception that cast iron is high maintenance, I consider cast iron to be almost maintenance free. I have not only left stuff overnight, I have left dutch ovens with cornbread remains for almost a year (oops).

                If there is stuck on food, washing it is as simple as scraping out the big chunks, adding water, bringing to a boil, scraping the remains, then dumping the water, quick dry with paper towel and wiping the still hot pan with oil. Can be done while the next day's lunch is cooking or in 5 - 10 minutes by either of you after the kids go to bed. If nothing stuck to the pan, a quick wipe out with a paper towel, rinse under hot water, wipe with paper towel and wipe with oil. If nothing stuck to the pan, it is faster than cleaning most other pans. It may be more convenient for your wife to wash other pans the regular way, but cast iron is not as high maintenance as many folks think.

                To get well seasoned stuff without the having to do it yourself, ask elderly relatives if they have some they no longer use or check tag sales and tell your wife you will take care of them. I really think cast iron is the best for frying, making cornbread and can make great pancakes among other things. Totally worth the few extra seconds/minutes over washing in the sink.

              2. I don't know why I can't edit my above post so I'll unfortunately have to double post:

                thanks for all the options! As most, I work quite a bit so end up doing a bunch of my "research" online and it's a bit difficult to know which pans are induction capable when searching online!

                cutiepie, any particular brands that are of decent quality with uniform heating?

                tanuki soup, I love our old Circulon for everything except cooking eggs :) It cooks evenly, but eggs tend to get caught in the ridges and while not "stuck" to the pan, they are wedged in and are a bit difficult to get out.

                Politeness
                I would love nothing more than to have the time and patience to properly care for cast iron as it is such a great tool to cook with, when properly cared for. However, I am 100% certain that there is no way my wife would make that commitment :) Our pans sometimes sit for hours or even overnight before being cleaned. They are always washed by hand, and if I do the cleaning they are dried immediately and put on the pot rack, but my wife is chasing around 2 kids as well as working from home so when she does the cleaning they get washed by hand and left to air dry. If there was such a thing as a maintenance free cast iron, I would buy stock in the company :)

                foiegras, I would LOVE to get some ScanPans but as you pointed out, way above my price range.

                Any opinions on the Emerialware proclad fry pan? It's only 8" but is reasonably priced and is tri-ply:
                http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/produ...

                Thanks,

                Russell

                1 Reply
                1. re: trpltongue

                  trpltongue: "I would love nothing more than to have the time and patience to properly care for cast iron as it is such a great tool to cook with, when properly cared for. However, I am 100% certain that there is no way my wife would make that commitment :) Our pans sometimes sit for hours or even overnight before being cleaned."

                  Willikers. My routine for cleaning the Griswold cast iron skillet after frying eggs is:

                  1. Wipe it with a paper towel.
                  2. (There is no 2 -- the pan has been put away after 1.)

                2. If you have a Marshalls or TJ Maxx near you, check out the cookware aisle. Berndes (a German manufacturer) non-stick pans show up there from time to time. They are very good quality and induction-capable.

                  1 Reply
                  1. re: cheesemaestro

                    The Berndes that I got from Maxx is (cast) aluminum, quite thick, with steel dots embedded in the base. Heat is very even.

                  2. Politeness,

                    That is good news to me! Everything I've read both here on Chowhound as well as on all external sites suggest washing with water, then applying a light coat of oil and warming in the oven or on the cooktop until the water / oil is dry. I very much respect your opinion on this matter though, based on your extensive knowledge. So you truly only wipe with a paper towel and put away? I could definitely live with that. In fact, I have an old cast iron skillet in my drawer. Would it be worth it to give it a try at refreshing and re-seasoning, or would I be better off getting a Griswold on ebay?

                    cheesemaestro,
                    I had read about Berndes but the prices I was seeing were a bit higher than others. I'll have to see if there's a Marshall's or TJMaxx around here (can't think of one off the top of my head.

                    Paul, thanks for the first hand experience. That's what makes this place so great! So many folks who take cooking seriously with so many different experiences.

                    4 Replies
                    1. re: trpltongue

                      trpltongue: "So you truly only wipe with a paper towel and put away?"

                      Really, truly, that's it. That's the short story.

                      The longer story is that that is all that I do when I have merely fried eggs, which is my primary use of the Griswold griddle. I put a little bacon grease or sesame oil on the griddle for the frying, and, after I am done, when the griddle has cooled down a little, but while the oil is still liquid, I rub a folded paper towel over the griddle to take up any excess oil. Then I put it away.

                      If I have used the griddle to cook something that leaves a solid residue (Johnsonville maple flavor pork sausages -- delicious -- contain maple syrup that leaves some caramel on the surface, for instance), there is an extra step: I wait until the griddle has cooled, put some kosher salt on the surface and rub it in until the color of the salt stops changing, then I rinse lightly, and put the griddle on the burner at low heat just long enough to evaporate the excess moisture. If the cast iron is well seasoned, it does not need to be re-oiled before putting it away.

                      trpltongue: "I have an old cast iron skillet in my drawer. Would it be worth it to give it a try at refreshing and re-seasoning, or would I be better off getting a Griswold on ebay?"

                      It really depends on what the old griddle is. As I have recounted here on Chowhound several times, in 1980, we bought a new Lodge skillet, and it had a slightly rough cooking surface. We really worked with that skillet: we did all of the "right" things to season it over the years, and for nearly 29 years it always underperformed. It never did get "truly nonstick," to use your phrase. In January 2009, we went the eBay route to get a Griswold (if you do the same make sure that it is a made-in-Erie Griswold and that it sits flat), and (after we stripped it and reseasoned it) it was super slick from the first day. So it depends on whether your skillet is "good cast iron" or "bad cast iron."

                      1. re: Politeness

                        Politeness,

                        As always, thanks for your informative post. The non-stick is primarily for eggs. The kiddos have eggs 3-4 times a week so it seems that using well seasoned cast iron wouldn't be much of an issue as far as maintenance. What about scrambled eggs? Similar procedure?

                        As for my cast iron skillet. I really have no idea what it is. It is at least 50yrs old, but has almost no stamping on it. The only thing I can make out is a number 7 on the top of the back side of the skillet. I don't see anything else on it. The cooking surface seems reasonably smooth, but is a bit rusty and in need of repair. I have gone ahead and put a bid on an "Erie" Griswold number 8 that "sits flat". Hopefully my bid of $15 will be enough to win :)

                        1. re: trpltongue

                          tripltongue: "What about scrambled eggs? Similar procedure?"

                          Our cast iron griddle, when lightly lubricated with bacon grease or sesame oil, works well with scrambled eggs; the eggs, once cooked, release completely from the griddle, leaving the film of oil behind (which can be cleaned up with a wipe of a paper towel).

                          In our case, however, our primary use of scrambled eggs is as a butter delivery medium. So we use an enameled cast iron (Descoware) frypan, well lubricated with butter, when we scramble eggs, and use a silicone spatula to get as much of the butter as we can to accompany the scrambled eggs from the frypan onto the plate. The enameled cast iron cleans up very easily with a drop of dishwasher soap and a quick swipe with a Chore Boy Longlast nylon scrubber sponge, http://www.amazon.com/Chore-Boy-Longl...

                          1. re: Politeness

                            In my younger days I did scrambled eggs and omelets on an old calaphon stainless skillet using low-heat and Pam. Then I caved and allowed myself a couple teflon skillets just for eggs. BTW, the only thing I've got against teflon is it's durability...

                    2. I recently renovated/remodeled a kitchen, after years on gas I was ready for something more efficient and easier to clean. I chose the GE Profile line for all the appliances in the kitchen, especially the cook top, which is the 5 burner Induction model. I have not regretted a single purchase and was able to use the GE rebate to purchase two sets of the JA Henckels Cookware which was designed specifically for Induction. For durable/non-stick (and not expensive) I went with a three frying pan set of Stoneline Cookware which I purchased through Amazon.com. I kept the smallest and the largest pan and gave the middle one to my son-in-law who does all the cooking in his household as I do in mine. They are all scratch resistant to wood, metal, and plastic. I have also found it impossible to get food to ‘stick’ and have discovered that no ‘oil’ or ‘spray’ is needed to cook/fry eggs. The only problem I have is Stoneline does not make a larger frying pan or griddle that I have been able to find. Hope this helps.

                      1. Our first skillet was the le creuset non stick skillet. We now own a large one and a small. Just don't heat over medium as you will lose your nonstick. On our cooktop we are fine not going over 5 (out of 9).
                        Unfortunately you are going to have to spend some bucks for these but buy the large first so you have flexibility. When you start to expand your collection the enameled cast iron dutch ovens are great, even discovered less expensive martha stewart line at macy's today and very happy with it.
                        You will not find an entire set for $50 that will work for induction as the quality is much higher. If you are looking for stainless also look at le creuset, as they are less $$ than all clad. The owner of our local kitchen store is still using the le creuset that his mother used 50 yrs ago. That should say something. It did to me. Good luck.

                        1. one more thing on induction in case you didn't know or discover yet. You can not use those square pans as your pan can only exceed .5 inches all the way around. Nor can you use one that is to small. Frustrating I know as most grill pan/press combos are square.

                          2 Replies
                          1. re: wwvw

                            wwvw, There is no way to sugar-coat this: the statements that you make are, simply, incorrect.

                            1. re: wwvw

                              Well, maybe it depends on the brand of cooktop you have, but I use an 11" square Swiss Diamond casserole (from their new induction-capable series) and a 12" square cast iron Iwachu grill pan on my induction cooktop without any problems, not to mention several round pots and pans measuring 12" or more in diameter.

                            2. I'm not using it on induction, but on ordinary electric I'm enjoying the Ikea 365+ pan. The 11" is 20 bucks (and there's a 9" for $15). http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/pro... It has a stainless steel exterior, nonstick interior and heavy disc bottom with aluminum center. Specifically states induction compatible. And my favorite feature, the one that made me choose it, no handle rivets on the inside of the pan. Whether this will make the handle unstable after a few years I don't yet know, but I've used it regularly for several months and it's still a favorite.

                              1 Reply
                              1. re: CrazyOne

                                It's double your budget but Macy's has an 7.5" and 9" All-Clad non-stick two pack bundle on special for $99. The only thing is that they are "French Skillets" which in all-clad speak means they removed them off of the assembly line before they went through the edge roller. They work perfectly well, however, and I'm even wondering If I can fully strip the teflon off them when they start peeling and just use them as standard stainless skillets..

                              2. I got a starter set of Circulon Infinite cookware when I bought my range. I loved them so much I bought a bunch more to complete the collection. Heavy, flat bases and even heating. No metal utensil restrictions and you can throw them in the dishwasher. Excellent construction quality. No ringing on my range top. Total home run in my book. When one of the small frying pans got scratched in shipment, Circulon sent me a new one and told me to keep or chuck the old one. Good old fashioned customer service and commitment to quality. Highly recommended.