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Yogurt Dipped Pretzels

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I thought I'd add these to the cookie tins this year, but I haven't found a recipe that sounds like a reputable source.

Anyone have experience making these babies at home?

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  1. I'm not entirely certain that these can be made at home.

    Yogurt covering doesn't vary much between products. The biggest difference is that natural products go with fractionated oils and less natural products go the hydrogenated oil route. Here is a list of ingredients for a typical natural version:

    Ingredients: Yogurt Coating (Evap. Cane Juice, Fractionated Palm Kernel Oil, Yogurt Powder, Soy Lecithin [An Emulsifier], Lactic Acid, Vanilla, Salt), Pretzels (Enriched Unbleached Wheat Flour [Niacin, Iron, Thiamin, Riboflavin, Folic Acid], Salt, Organic Canola Oil, Yeast, Sodium Bicarbonate, Soda). Contains: Milk, Soy, And Wheat (Gluten).

    The key ingredient is the fractionated palm kernel oil. Basically, they take an already pretty solid/saturated fat and make it even more solid/saturated by separating out the liquid oil component.

    You need a hard/solid fat. Much harder/more solid than Crisco. Even if you could get your hands on a rigid fractionated (or hydrogenated) oil, there's no guarantee you could match the manufacturing process. In theory, it could be just powdered sugar mixed with melted fat, but more complex processes such as tempering/crystallization could be involved.

    I think the closest approximation to a yogurt coating a home cook could achieve would be enrobing with white chocolate. With a good brand of chocolate (such as Callebaut) the results should actually be superior. Yogurt coating is, to an extent, a type of poor man's white chocolate couverture. Chilling the enrobed pretzel to harden the coating would be easiest, but, imo, it wouldn't do it justice- you'd really need to go the tempering route.

    No matter how much of a hassle tempering can be, it's a night and day difference from tracking down/dealing with fractionated oil and guessing processes via trial and error. Tempering chocolate is a very well known/well documented procedure. Working with fractionated oil- not so much. The devil you know is better than the devil you don't.

    1 Reply
    1. re: scott123

      Ditto what scott123 said.

      You *can* make homemade yogurt covered pretzels but they won't resemble what you buy from the store. You need some sort of binder -- ie. the palm oil -- and making your own hydrogenated palm oil is not something I would recommend (even for someone like Alton Brown). Aside from crisco, another substitute for palm oil might be something like margarine.

      One work around this problem might be to make a pseduo-icing using yogurt instead of milk.

      So if traditional icing contains some combo of the following:
      *confectioners' sugar
      *butter
      *vanilla extract
      *salt
      *milk
      I would sub out the milk with an equal portion of yogurt

      Good luck.

    2. I've seen a couple recipes on line, here's a few links:
      http://www.recipezaar.com/Yogurt-Cove...
      The first link provides an easy version, but it's akin to frosting-covered pretzels, meh.
      It's your call, though.
      http://hungrybrowser.com/phaedrus/m02...
      The second link is for a yogurt raisin cluster, but purportedly can be used for pretzels.
      The shiny coat you can't get is just a sprayed-on mixture of corn syrup and sugar in a liquid form, applied while panning, and is commonly added to candies like M & M's.
      I like the second recipe; I think the addition of the white chocolate will set up as a firm coating and possibly give your end product some gloss.
      Anyway, without setting up a chem lab in your kitchen, your options are kinda slim.
      Good luck.

      1. Really people?! The first time I ever tasted these delectables, they were homemade. Of course, not the pretzel but the coating. I am now on a mission to post here not an adequate but superb recipe for all to try.

        P.S. Most mass-produced, store-bought food contains ingredients never used in the homemade version. sheesh ;)

        3 Replies
        1. re: fancyfoxy

          FYI, this discussion is from a year-and-a-half ago, so the OP has likely figured it out by now.

          1. re: goodhealthgourmet

            Actually, I never did. So if fancyfoxy has some advice that isn't white chocolate, I'd be highly obliged!

            1. re: thinks too much

              well, if you want to replicate the store-bought pretzels, buy "white yogurt coating" or "yogurt chips" - same stuff the manufacturers use, and you just melt it and dip/coat the pretzels...or dried fruit, or nuts or granola clusters, or dried ginger ;)

              i haven't bought this particular product from either them, but i've had success with items from Barry Farms and Nuts Online:
              http://www.barryfarm.com/nutri_info/b...
              http://www.nutsonline.com/chocolatess...

        2. Just in time for your 2012 cookie tins! I have not tried this recipe but came across this discussion while searching for a recipe of my own: http://www.stonyfield.com/recipes/yog...

          Seems like the approach suggested above of making a 'yogurt icing' is the way to go. But maybe these aren't a great gift option ... you're supposed to eat then within 3 days.

          Also this: http://sarahlipoff.com/2011/09/09/yog...

          1. In my experience, their are more akin to royal icing with some dried yogurt throw in to make them sounds healthy.