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Mastro's Steakhouse Bone-In Ribeye

m
michael s Mar 9, 2005 11:05 AM

Does anyone know the secret to the flavor of the bone-in ribeye at Mastro's Steakhouse in Beverly Hills?

It's really an amazing and unique flavor for steak. Like drug addicts we keep coming back to spend more than we should on this pleasure. My girlfriend is convinced they sprinkle some crack on it, but I'm inclined to believe it's just butter.

Anyone know how they make it taste so goo?

  1. lotta_cox Aug 23, 2007 01:11 PM

    i am thinking heroin, but i coulod easily be swayed into believing it is crack. don't they inject the steaks at ruth's chris with butter? someone once told me they thought mastro's was just coating their steaks in butter. iono.

    2 Replies
    1. re: lotta_cox
      tatertotsrock Aug 23, 2007 01:14 PM

      Hey lotta_cox, definitely heroine. Considering the yummy euphoria I am wrapped in after a meal there...MMmmm, heroine-laced butter...I think they do it to the lobster mashed potatos too...damn that dish! So good.
      Butter on steak-it's a good thing.

      1. re: tatertotsrock
        lotta_cox Aug 24, 2007 02:17 PM

        after reading this thread, yesterday, i almost went to mastro's for dinner tonight. even thinking about it is getting me a contact high.

    2. s
      sportsfan8 Aug 23, 2007 12:40 PM

      I'm drooling... can't wait to go back to Mastro's in Costa Mesa next month for my birthday. Bone-in ribeye here I come...

      1. r
        randgalt Aug 22, 2007 12:57 AM

        FYI - Bluestar now sells a home salamander (1800+ degrees, infrared)

        1. k
          Kurt Mar 9, 2005 05:12 PM

          take a prime steak, salt and pepper and hit the 1000-degree broiler until done. it is good, but the broiler is what does the trick

          2 Replies
          1. re: Kurt
            j
            Jeff W Mar 10, 2005 08:23 PM

            Have you ever done research regarding the type of broilers you are speaking of, for home use? I've heard that they actually fire up to something like 1600 degrees. I still don't know the difference between a salamander and infra red broiling, but I'm told that they are both quite hot temperature wise. After a very expensive kitchen re-model, I am not quite ready---but one of these broilers will eventually live in our home. In the meanwhile, the char-grill on my Wolf range is doing a fabulous job. One and a half inch steaks, 4 1/2 minutes per side---very crusty char, and juicy medium rare interior---of course it helps to have dry aged prime steaks!
            Cheers,
            Jeff

            1. re: Jeff W
              k
              kel Aug 9, 2007 02:22 PM

              Had anyone experiences this since 2005?

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