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Apex EdgePro sharpening system

I would appreciate opinions on this sharpening system. It is very expensive so is it worth the money. According to some opinions which i have read from the following give it a high recommendation. Would this system give me the technolgy to sharpen like a pro. I do sue wet stones and get decent results but would this system push me t the next level.

http://users.ameritech.net/knives/kni...

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  1. Hi Wdames,

    I do not have hands-on experience on this system, but I have read much about it. It does really hold then angle, but it has some complaints.

    In case, you have not seen a demonstration. I thought a youtube video can give you a better sense of how it works.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1izC_N...

    The common complaints are that it is slow and the selection of grit size is limited It also have some problem with very small or very large knives -- or so I raed.. It is ok if you just want to give your knives a touch-up, but if you want to really put a new edge at new angle or smooth out a chipped/cracked edge, then it is slow.

    In my opinion, the simple flat water stones are better. The only problem with flat stone sharpening is holding the angle. However, if you can hold your knife at a relatively consistent angle (you seem to able to do already), then I do not think there is any system can top that approach. Think about it. Almost all sharpening gadgets are about helping you to establish a consistent angle. If you already can hold you knife steady, then there is no point at all. The free hand sharpening approach provides you better selection of grit stones than other gadget systems. Therefore, it may not push you to the next level.

    I shall let the more experienced knife experts to comment on this.

    1 Reply
    1. re: Chemicalkinetics

      I agree. I will never be a proffesional but I do keep my knives sharp and although I am not perfect I do a better job than mechanical sharpener Che'f Choice.

    2. Some information beyond what chem just listed.

      I have used an edgepro. It was what got me into sharpening (that and the utterly miserable results I had previously gotten with roller sharpeners, carbide shearing sharpeners, and a miserable electrical off-brand POS). The edgepro belonged to a friend. Since then I bought stones and learned free-handing because that appealed to me. But I can compare the two options for you.

      The results you can get on an edgepro in terms of a sharp, precise, and uniform edge, are fantastic. Better (or at least cleaner/prettier) than I can do free-hand, and I'm not bad at free-handing. This is even with the abrasives that come with it.

      Chem it right that you are initially limited in terms of abrasive selection. However, some people have taken initiative to make high quality abrasives for use with the edgepro system.
      http://www.chefknivestogo.com/edgepro...
      The chosera stones there are mostly out of stock. I believe someone over at knifeforums was making these for sale also. You might have to look around for a bit or wait for cktg to restock. These can certainly make it easier to either use the system for reprofiling or extremely fine polishing.

      In terms of quickness- I think that generally the edgepro is faster than free-handing if you're not well experienced at free-handing, and slower if you are. This is because if you are inconsistent at holding an angle or have to check your progress every few seconds, you will have a lot more wasted effort free-handing than you will with an edgepro. If you're experienced though, the wider stones for free handing are definitely quicker.

      I believe the edgepro cannot apply an edge angle below 10 degrees (20 degrees included). I could be off by a couple degrees. This is a limitation that you should consider. Definitely sub-optimal for some high end Japanese knives, for example.

      As I said, I free hand, but my reasons for not buying an edgepro myself are mainly financial and the fact that free-handing appeals to me. The edgepro works great, and I recommend it highly if you are interested and have the disposable income. If you are already good at free handing you will probably at least notice cleaner bevels. If not, everything about your sharpening results will improve, perhaps drastically.

      13 Replies
      1. re: cowboyardee

        Cowboy,

        Thanks. I learnt much.

        Wdames,

        There we go. A experienced knife lover who has used both approaches. So are you going to get it? It is about $170, right? It is not that bad. About the same as a high end electrical knife sharpener.

        http://www.spitjack.com/Merchant2/mer...

        1. re: Chemicalkinetics

          No but I always appreciate your input on knifes. I am always looking for a edge :) What I would really like is to take a class with professional who could improve my technique.
          I do use my mechancial when a knife is really dull but finish with my wet stones. Would you consider the EdgePro a higher end knife sharpener?

          1. re: wdames

            Wdames,

            I should warn you. I recently went on a date with a gal and she asked me about my hobbits and I said I enjoy cooking and baking, then she commented and probably joked about me being a good housewife. Then, I tried to be more macho and said I am learning and enjoy knife sharpening. I think she freaked out and said this is really strange three times in a row. You know how sometime there is a precise moment when you know a date is going downhill. That was it. Now, do you still want to take a class to improve your technique?

            You mean comparing the Apex EdgePro with an electric sharpener? My understanding is that the Apex Edge Pro is better in term of performance, but slower than an electric sharpener, so I do consider the Apex Edge Pro a high performance knife sharpener. However, I should really let people with real hands-on experience to comment on this, like cowboy.

            1. re: Chemicalkinetics

              Your first problem was saying you were a "hobbit." :D

              wdames, instead of a class, how about a DVD from Dave Martel japanese knife sharpening extrordinaire?
              http://www.japaneseknifesharpeningsto...
              I think Murray Carter and Korin have dvds as well. I think Carter has said he never sharpens past 1000 grit. He also hand held the knife and hand held the stone once while sharpening in front of a KF member at a show!

              1. re: deeznuts

                Deeznuts,

                :) That makes perfect sense. She freaked out because she thought I am a Hobbit. I should have said I am an orc. For the Horde! :P Nah, we dated in person (not online), so there was no typo. On top of that, I didn't say it is a hobby. I was much milder. I said I am learning about knife sharpening.

                I just want to give wdames a fair warning to not go around and tell everyone that he wants to take a knife sharpening class because many people discriminate our kind :)

                1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                  Oh I know, I was just fooling with you. Since you said she freaked out, and had the typo from hobby to hobbit, it was a perfect setup. I couldn't resist :D

                  I tell my friends and girlfriend I want to learn how to sharpen my knives, but never the class or dvd. If they ask, I'll say I saw a couple videos on youtube and practiced. They don't care, they say hurry up so I can sharpen their knives.

                  1. re: deeznuts

                    Deeznuts,

                    I know. I would have done exactly the same thing if I am in your place. That is funny stuff. I also help to sharpen my friends' knives for practice. I just tell them that I do not work their favorest knife. The last thing I want is to mess up someone's favorest knife.

                    I think if a person is into cooking, then he/she will soon understand the importance of cutlery and therefore knife sharpening. The person may not be into it, but he/she will understand that desire. I do not personally want a Le Creuset set, but I certainly understanding that desire. I also do not need an induction cooktop, but I understand that feeling. Now, this person who I went out was not into cooking and certainly not cutlery. As such, I must look rather odd and freaky from her angle. The only people she can related my knife sharpening desire are serial killers in the movies.

                    1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                      "I must look rather odd and freaky from her angle. The only people she can related my knife sharpening desire are serial killers in the movies."
                      ------------------------------------------------------------------------

                      Yeah like Dexter. Love that show. I want a knife roll like his. Okay, rather freakish from any angle.

                      1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                        Well. turns out she's the freak then ChemK. Heh.

                        1. re: deeznuts

                          Deeznuts,

                          :) Wow, thanks for the support. Looks like I keep on going out with gals who do not cook. The first girl I had a real big crush on, she could not boil water. She had a bad experience when she was a kid, like starting a fire in kitchen, so she is forever scared of kitchen stovetop. She could use microwave though. :P

            2. re: Chemicalkinetics

              I like sharp knives and have tried many different sharpening systems including the top of the line chef's choice, spyderco and now the edge pro. I was finally able to get a razor edge on my kitchen knives. I just bought some MAC knives and sharpened them right out of the box down to 12 degrees per side. they can slice tomatoes by just pulling the blade back without exerting any downward pressure... Same for carrots onions etc. The edgepro is by far superior to any sharpener I've used. It does require some labor and time, especially if your knives are really dull and need some reprofiling... touchups are pretty quick

              1. re: lloydl2

                I have been an EP Apex supporter from the first day I got mine. For someone who does not want to go freehand the EP is the best sharpening jig out there. Now with new after market stones you really have a vast array of stones to choose from.

            3. re: cowboyardee

              The new custom kit has a large variety of stones it comes with 220 Grit Edge Pro Stone 320 Grit Edge Pro Stone 400 Grit Chosera Stone (l. green) 1,000 Grit Chosera Stone (d.green) 3,000 Grit Chosera Stone (maroon) 5,000 Grit Chosera Stone (gray) 10,000 Grit Chosera Stone (l. blue) from what i understand the 10k is out of stock at the moment. I took me a while to splurge and buy one but now that I have it I don't regret it for a min, that being said if you do buy one order the 120 stone too you will need it for anything that is in rough shape

            4. I have the Edge Pro Apex and it is worth the money. Even though I have a full set of Shapton glass stones and can put a shaving sharp edge on freehand the EdgePro will do a better job in most cases. One thing for sure, the width of the edge will be very even coming off the EP and the ability of maintaining a constant angle is solved with the EP. No way can I be as precise freehand. I use both methods. I continue to do freehand to get more proficient but a few minutes on the EP is humbling. As far as cost I spent more on my whetstones than the EP. I had not one moment of buyers remorse once I started sharpening on the EP. It is totally worth it to me.

              1 Reply
              1. re: scubadoo97

                I have an Edge Pro as well as some Glass Stones, and I keep coming back to the Edge Pro. Mainly it's a safer way for me to put a really good edge or maintain the edge on one of my kitchen knives. Lately, I've been really pushed for time, so I pick more-certain results over getting up the skill-curve on low-angle freehand.

              2. I've had the Apex for a bout a year and while it was expensive I've been satisfied. Although I enjoy maintaining my knives I got inconsistent results using stones and realized that I just wasn't willing to put the time in to learn stones so the Apex was a good compromise in my opinion. Given the cost of sending out 5-6 knives to be professionally sharpened a few times a year I feel it's already come close to paying for itself. It's easy to use and it only takes a long time the very first time you use it to get the motion down and find the right angles for what you want to do. After the first time I've found that doing touch ups has been very quick, only a few minutes per knife.

                1. I have an EP, about 4 months old. I'm pretty happy, I can get quite sharp.

                  an 8" german knife with belly gets kind of tedious, though. I prefer to sharpen a knife with less belly.

                  The only thing is that now I want to try hand sharpening, but I've just sunk so much money into the EP already.

                  I think you should upgrade to Apex Kit 3 instead of the basic Kit 1. You're going to want the ceramic hone and the 120 stone. Once you've established your edge with the 120/220 stones, you're hardly going to spend any time on the higher grits, but the payoff will be large.