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"Asian Dumplings" cookbook

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Any reports on Andrea Nguyen's new book? Have you found it practical for making dumplings at home?

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  1. I bought a copy a week or two ago but haven't use it yet. I've read it a lot and find it well organized and the recipes very appealing. It begins with a section describing the various flours and other ingredients that might not be familiar to many western cooks, plus descriptions of basic dough making and rolling techniques. The recipes are mostly organized by the type of dough or wrapper used. This is definitely not "101 ways to make pot stickers".

    One caveat: if you don't live near a good asian or latino market where you can buy things like glutinous rice flour, rice starch, and tapioca starch, and you don't want to pay a bit more to order online, this may not be the book for you.

    1. I got "The Dumpling: A Seasonal Guide" by Wai Hon Chu and Connie Lovatt which came out around the same time I think. http://www.thedumpling.com/Home.html

      Still have yet to cook from it, but I like the variety and depth of approach - pierogi, shumai, etc. If anyone has been cooking from this, I'd be curious to know your experiences.

      1 Reply
      1. re: pitu

        I looked at this book, but the month by month format just didn't work for me. I knew it would be very under utilized due to the way recipes are arranged. (sigh) I was very excited about the concept though!

      2. I have made dumplings and potstickers from the Asian Dumplings Cookbook. I really like it!

        1. I know this is old, and OP has long ago decided to buy or not. However, I just got this book this week and made 2 recipes. I tried the gyoza with extra-chewy skins and the chinese chive dumplings with the wheat gluten wrappers. I made half a batch of each along with the appropriate sauces. It took about 3 hours of very casual cooking plus help chopping from B. I could probably do the same in about half the time next time. Great instructions and great results. Not nearly as difficult to make from scratch as I thought. We ate way too much. Anybody else have favorite recipes from this book? I can't wait to try something else.

          4 Replies
          1. re: corneygirl

            Try the baked bun recipes. Yum! I make the Char Siu (bbq ) pork buns often.
            And the Curried chicken buns always get rave reviews.
            I have made alot of the dumplings, love them.
            Her book into the vietnamese kitchen is very good too!

            1. re: afullpantry

              Glad to see your feedback on this book. I was looking at it recently.

              Bun are usually steamed, right? How were the baked ones?

              1. re: afullpantry

                The Vietnamese Kitchen is what turned me on to the other books. I'll definitely try the bun, probably both cooking methods. Thanks for the feedback!

              2. re: corneygirl

                Thanks for sharing your experiences. I looked through the book several times and have made dumplings a few times, but -- fantastic and clear as the book is -- I am spoiled with the range of handmade dumplings available at retail where I live in SF so it's rarely worth the time for me to make them from scratch.

                Someday, if I have more time and live someplace with less access to handmade frozen dumplings, I could see making this book my bible and seriously getting into dumpling-making!