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Got my first KitchenAid Artisan Mixer. Recommendations?

helenahimm Dec 4, 2009 03:12 PM

Hi I just received my first Stand Mixer... I have to buy a screwdriver so I can adjust the hooks distance from the bowl.

Besides the manual the Mixer comes with does anyone have any other advice to take care of the mixer.

Should I buy a cover for it if I am going to have it in the kitchen? I am moving to a Studio next week and I know it's going to take some counter space, but I would rather not move it and I know I will be using it over 5 times weekly so it's better to leave it there.

Thanks in advance for who can share any info =)

Cheers.

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  1. j
    Jane917 RE: helenahimm Dec 4, 2009 04:31 PM

    My best advice.....buy the ice cream attachment!

    1 Reply
    1. re: Jane917
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      rainey RE: Jane917 Dec 4, 2009 04:45 PM

      See? I would have said the pasta kneader and cutter.

      Seriously, congrats! You're going to love it and love all the things it can do.

      I've never covered mine. It doesn't require any babying. It's a work horse.

    2. n
      Normandie RE: helenahimm Dec 5, 2009 01:44 PM

      I keep mine in a cabinet now, but lived in a house with less cupboard space for the first two years I had the mixer and left it out on the counter. I agree with rainey; it's a workhorse, it's tough, and I don't see that it requires covering, unless you happen to prefer that look. But certainly not for protective reasons. I just wiped it down regularly when I was cleaning the kitchen, but since you'll be using it so often, you'll probably be doing that anyway.

      I think it's a great product and I hope you enjoy using it as much as so many of us here seem to.

      1. helenahimm RE: helenahimm Dec 6, 2009 05:09 AM

        Thank you guys!

        Now I see ice cream attachment and pasta kneader and cutter... but has anyone used the "Grinder" attachment? I would love to start making my Tamales and I need to grind the Corn, is it worthy?

        Cheers,

        PS. Last night I beated egg whites for the the fun of it.. i know im sick... lol.

        7 Replies
        1. re: helenahimm
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          rainey RE: helenahimm Dec 6, 2009 09:12 AM

          I'm actually considering the grinding attachment. What holds me back is that I'm not sure I'd use it that much. What keeps me considering is it that it's harder to find a butcher and things like ground pork when you want them. Plus grinding chunk meat together would mean less handling of the ground meat and an airier mix.

          1. re: helenahimm
            alanbarnes RE: helenahimm Dec 6, 2009 04:30 PM

            The grinder attachment is my favorite. 7-bone chuck turns into the best hamburgers EVER. When pork shoulder's on sale you can make and freeze breakfast sausage or bulk Italian sausage. Or add the sausage stuffer and make links.

            Don't know how it would do making masa, though; it's a meat grinder, not a grain mill.

            1. re: alanbarnes
              j
              jzerocsk RE: alanbarnes Dec 7, 2009 09:37 AM

              There is a grain mill attachment available!

              I am also a big fan of the grinder and the pasta rollers.

              1. re: alanbarnes
                c oliver RE: alanbarnes Dec 12, 2009 06:54 AM

                You KNEW I was going to second the grinder attachment, didn't you?!? And Safeway has whole pork shoulders on sale for 97 cents or 87 cents for the whole one. Homemade sausage is to die for. I recently made "ham salad" for the first time and ground the already-cooked ham. And I recently had some beef get overdone (kiss of death in my house) and I've ground it and will make hash. It's about $50 if I remember correctly and I've gotten my monies worth.

                I started out storing mine on a shelf in the pantry but I use if often enough (not five times a week though) that it's out on the counter. And while I originally thought about getting a cover, I didn't. I don't cover my toaster or toaster oven, so didn't see the rationale.

                I have the pasta attachments also but don't use nearly as much. But DID make Hazan's spinach lasagne noodles the other day and they were great.

                Congratulations. You're gonna love LOVE this machine, I'm sure.

                1. re: c oliver
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                  rainey RE: c oliver Dec 12, 2009 08:33 AM

                  I just bought the grinder last night spurred on by this thread. It doesn't have the stuffing extruder. Do you know if I can buy that separately? Any tips on where to buy casings?

                  1. re: rainey
                    alanbarnes RE: rainey Dec 12, 2009 08:37 AM

                    The sausage horn is sold separately. You can get casings at many grocery stores (but they're not prominently displayed, so ask first instead of hunting) or order them online.

                    1. re: rainey
                      c oliver RE: rainey Dec 12, 2009 08:42 AM

                      It's funny. I have the "extruder" but have never used it. I make my sausage in bulk and freeze in 8 and 16oz. packages. But I realized the other day that my Mexican market would have them because that's how they make their chorizo. So next time I'll do some in links.

              2. m
                malisa0607 RE: helenahimm Dec 6, 2009 08:56 AM

                I recommend storing it where you want to use it. I have mine on the counter and usually will use it there but yesterday I decided to move it to the island because I had all my ingredients on the island. It was heavy! I have the Pro 600 and it weighs about 8-9 pounds more than the artisan.

                I also recommend testing its limits. The first day I got mine, I made bread and cinnamon buns. The Pro 600 is supposed to handle 14 cups of AP flour. Both of my recipes called for about 5 cups of bread flour (still well under the limit) and the mixer kept overheating. I called customer service the next day and after asking a few questions, the rep decided that mine was defective and sent out a new one right away. I got my new mixer in about 4 days. I put my old mixer in the box and sent it back to them. They have excellent customer service. (Unlike Nikon. I'm still pissed at Nikon. I returned my Nikon and bought a Canon.)

                I have the shredder/slicer attachment but it is still in the box. I use my Cuisinart for shredding. My friend loves his ice cream attachment.

                I love making chiffon and sponge cakes using the mixer. I get several requests for Chinese birthday cake. It is a light sponge cake with fresh strawberries and fresh whipped cream. It is almost like a genoise cake but better.

                1 Reply
                1. re: malisa0607
                  helenahimm RE: malisa0607 Dec 6, 2009 03:59 PM

                  That's a great tip, tomorrow I will test a recipe tomorrow (model KitchenAid KSM150PSOB Artisan Series 5-Quart Mixer, Onyx Black)

                  It's good to hear about the Customer service and I hope I don't get any trouble.

                  Shame on Nikon though!

                2. o
                  overresearched RE: helenahimm Dec 7, 2009 11:06 AM

                  I'd look at getting another bowl and a bowl cover. It helps when you need to make two things without washing the bowl first. As an example, you want to make cheesecake and need to whip cream.

                  2 Replies
                  1. re: overresearched
                    helenahimm RE: overresearched Dec 8, 2009 04:22 AM

                    perfect tip, that's what i will get then! plus the grain mill attachment Jzerocsk mentioned.

                    Thanks very much =)

                    1. re: overresearched
                      m
                      middydd RE: overresearched Dec 10, 2009 09:02 PM

                      Second the extra bowl.

                      You'll never have to sift dry ingredients again. Use one bowl for wet ingredients and put dry in the other, use whisk to aerate and blend (lowish speed).

                    2. MikeB3542 RE: helenahimm Dec 8, 2009 11:10 AM

                      My recommendation is to take it easy -- lots of space on the chowhound and KA boards from folks who have dead mixers. Part of the problem is the old "they don't make 'em like they used to when Hobart owned the company" issue.

                      But read the posts! A lot of the problem is owners who overtax the heck out of their units. They are amazed, SIMPLY AMAZED, that the motor burnt out after a chocolate chip cookie marathon... or that the gears are stripped after mixing three batches of whole wheat bread at once (after grinding the flower with the mill attachment.)

                      Don't be amazed. Watch your quantities and give it a break if it sounds like it laboring or feels warm.

                      3 Replies
                      1. re: MikeB3542
                        c oliver RE: MikeB3542 Dec 12, 2009 06:57 AM

                        I think that's an excellent point.. I make 5-10# of ground meat at a time but I cut the meat in small enough pieces, the "guider" attachment is a guider not a plunger. If my husband's helping by cutting up the meat, I still stop the mixer periodically so it won't over heat.

                        1. re: MikeB3542
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                          rainey RE: MikeB3542 Dec 12, 2009 08:35 AM

                          Mine is more than 30 years old. I covet that new red one with the glass bowl but, at the same time, my old one made with indestructible parts got overheated ONCE in 30 years of serious use. Can't turn your back on that kind of reliability.

                          1. re: rainey
                            c oliver RE: rainey Dec 12, 2009 08:43 AM

                            I got mine in white a few years ago because Amazon had them refurbished with a full factory warranty for $170ish. Who can be picky about color at that price? Plus flour is white :)

                        2. Indirect Heat RE: helenahimm Dec 10, 2009 08:20 PM

                          It's bulletproof. Work it hard, beat it up, and get lots of marks on it. I think kitchen gear with scars on it is cooler, anyway. Proves you're actually cooking with it, not just using it as a decorative piece. But in terms of keeping it operable? These things are impervious.

                          1 Reply
                          1. re: Indirect Heat
                            alanbarnes RE: Indirect Heat Dec 10, 2009 09:51 PM

                            Marks are all well and good, but how 'bout some decals?

                             
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