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help mee!

lemonsaregood Nov 4, 2009 09:54 AM

i am in S2 in secondary school + i have just got through to a serious round in a cooking competition. we have to cook a main course and a dessert in an hour and a half. i am trying to focus all my attention to my main course so i am looking for a quick pudding, but shows off a range of skills. if anyone can help, that would be brilliant :) i need to know ASAP! thank you everybody :D

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    scott123 RE: lemonsaregood Nov 4, 2009 10:02 AM

    Jello instant pudding is pretty quick :)

    Seriously, though... quick pudding.... that's tricky. You could probably make a cooked rice based pudding in a blender pretty quickly. If my memory serves me correctly, I think Heston Blumenthal does a blender pudding of some sorts. Can you start with cooked rice or would you have to cook the rice from scratch?

    Custards can be quick, although, the quicker they are, the more like you'll end up with scrambled eggs. There may be ingredients you can use that will mitigate this, though.

    Vegetable gums can make up quick pudding and impress on a science level, but, when you end up with a slimy mess, that might not work too well for you.

    1. 4
      4Snisl RE: lemonsaregood Nov 4, 2009 10:36 AM

      Are you using the term "pudding" in a British sense, which is more analogous to the (general) term "dessert"?

      6 Replies
      1. re: 4Snisl
        BobB RE: 4Snisl Nov 4, 2009 10:52 AM

        Given the OP's use of the term brilliant, I'd say yes, (s)he is British, in which case we're just looking for a quick but creative dessert.

        Something that shows off a range of skills - hmm...

        Lemonlover, we don't know what skills you have, but maybe crepes topped with whipped cream and either berries or melted chocolate? Those are all quick preparations and would show off your ability to make a batter, cook it correctly (be sure to practice at home first!), whip the cream (add about 1 tbsp of confectioner's sugar - icing sugar to you - and 1 tsp of vanilla extract per cup of heavy cream) and melt chocolate without burning it.

        1. re: BobB
          bushwickgirl RE: BobB Nov 4, 2009 11:18 AM

          Oops, didn't notice the brilliant. She did ask for a quick pudding, which won't happen with a British pudding recipe.
          Anyway, I like your crepe idea.

          1. re: BobB
            s
            scott123 RE: BobB Nov 4, 2009 11:21 AM

            Topped crepes are 'pudding?' Yeesh, I can deal with Lorries, bumming a fag, Bob's your uncle, etc. etc. I can even see how trifle might be called pudding and fully comprehend pudding sausages. But topped crepes 'pudding?'

            1. re: scott123
              BobB RE: scott123 Nov 4, 2009 11:27 AM

              In British English (or as they would put it, "in English") pudding simply means dessert. It's only we Americans who use it as a close synonym for custard.

              1. re: scott123
                paulj RE: scott123 Nov 4, 2009 05:25 PM

                How about crepes filled with pastry cream? She could make the cream at the start and let it cool. Also make the crepe batter early on to let it rest.

                1. re: paulj
                  lemonsaregood RE: paulj Nov 5, 2009 10:52 AM

                  hi there everybody :) sorry, i meant pudding as dessert haha, just an old family saying. my family always refer to a dessert as a 'pudding'. sorry about all the confusion. thanks for the ideas though :) i will sure take them into consideration.

          2. bushwickgirl RE: lemonsaregood Nov 4, 2009 10:44 AM

            Pudding is normally quick to make but pehaps the chilling time would be an issue for you.

            2 cups whole milk
            1/2 cup sugar
            1/3 cup cocoa powder
            4 teaspoons cornstarch (that would be 1 Tbsp. and 1 tsp.)
            3 large egg yolks (skill 1#, separating eggs)
            2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
            1/4 teaspoon fine salt

            Directions
            Blend a little milk, 1/2 cup from the 2 cups in the recipe, with the cocoa powder to make a paste, add the sugar and another cup of the milk and bring to a simmer.

            Whisk together the remaining milk, egg yolks, cornstarch and salt in a separate bowl. Gradually whisk in the hot milk (skill 2#: tempering) into the egg yolk mixture, return to the saucepan and cook, over med. heat, whisking constantly, until thickened. Reduce heat to simmer and cook for another 2-3 minutes. Add vanilla. Done.

            To chill, press a piece of plastic wrap directly over the surface of the pudding, unless you like the skin.
            Good luck, sounds like a fun competition.

            1 Reply
            1. re: bushwickgirl
              lemonsaregood RE: bushwickgirl Nov 5, 2009 11:33 AM

              thanks for your help bushwickgirl! sounds greatt.

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              normalheightsfoodie RE: lemonsaregood Nov 4, 2009 12:04 PM

              This was recently in the New York Times. I have made it several times and I use less eggs and a cup of ground almonds and I added dried cherries. Good luck!

              THE MINIMALIST; Cake, Tart, Frittata: Call It the New Baking

              IN my ongoing quest to make baking easier, I thought I might try making a flourless, crustless tart that was more than a custard and not a cake, either. I had an idea for a mostly stovetop dish that resembled a tart, a kind of dessert frittata that was as simple to make as an omelet, but rich, chewy and sweet.

              Once I had the concept, the execution wasn't that difficult. I started with a base of eggs (not surprising) and chose almonds, pulverized in the food processor, instead of flour; I was after flavor, not lightness. For a more interesting texture, I tossed in a handful of sliced almonds as well.

              Cream, sugar, a little lemon juice for balance, and I had what seemed like a pretty promising batter in front of me. So promising, in fact, that it took a couple of tries for me to slow the process down and recognize that time was a key element: to keep the eggs from curdling, I needed to back down the temperature.

              I wound up cooking the tart -- that's really what it is -- for just a few minutes over low heat, just to let the eggs set up. Then I moved it to the oven to finish.

              Being a fan of anything crisp, I stuck the pan under the broiler for a minute to brown the top, sprinkled it with some powdered sugar and declared success. The pan-baked tart is rich, moist, sweet and easy.

              For a decadent breakfast, a new twist on the classic coffeecake or a last-minute dessert, this is definitely my kind of baking.

              Recipe: Pan-Baked Lemon-Almond Tart Time: About 20 minutes

              4 eggs

              1/2 cup sugar

              Pinch of salt

              1/2 cup ground almonds

              1/2 cup cream

              1/2 cup sliced almonds, more for garnish

              1 lemon, zest and juice

              2 tablespoons butter

              Powdered sugar, for garnish.

              1. Heat oven to 400 degrees. In a bowl, combine eggs, sugar, salt, ground almonds, cream, sliced almonds, lemon zest and juice.

              2. Melt butter in an 8-inch ovenproof skillet over low heat; when foam has subsided, add almond mixture to pan, tilting pan to distribute batter evenly. Continue to cook tart on stovetop until edges just begin to set, then put pan in oven and finish cooking, about 10 to 15 minutes more.

              3. When tart is done, put it in broiler for about a minute or until just golden on top. Sprinkle with powdered sugar and sliced almonds. Serve.

              Yield: 4 servings.

              Recipe: Pan-Baked Lemon-Almond Tart Time: About 20 minutes

              4 eggs

              1/2 cup sugar

              Pinch of salt

              1/2 cup ground almonds

              1/2 cup cream

              1/2 cup sliced almonds, more for garnish

              1 lemon, zest and juice

              2 tablespoons butter

              Powdered sugar, for garnish.

              1. Heat oven to 400 degrees. In a bowl, combine eggs, sugar, salt, ground almonds, cream, sliced almonds, lemon zest and juice.

              2. Melt butter in an 8-inch ovenproof skillet over low heat; when foam has subsided, add almond mixture to pan, tilting pan to distribute batter evenly. Continue to cook tart on stovetop until edges just begin to set, then put pan in oven and finish cooking, about 10 to 15 minutes more.

              3. When tart is done, put it in broiler for about a minute or until just golden on top. Sprinkle with powdered sugar and sliced almonds. Serve.

              Yield: 4 servings.

              1 Reply
              1. re: normalheightsfoodie
                lemonsaregood RE: normalheightsfoodie Nov 5, 2009 11:33 AM

                as you can see from my name, i love lemons :) i think they are a great food. sounds like a perfect dessert to me. thanks for your help normalheightsfoodie!

              2. n
                Nyleve RE: lemonsaregood Nov 4, 2009 12:55 PM

                I have a great recipe for molten chocolate cakes (individual ones) which can be assembled very quickly (maybe while your main is cooking - or before you start it) and then thrown into the oven for 12 or so minutes to bake. You serve them warm with whipped cream and they're delicious.

                5 squares (1-oz/28 g each) semisweet chocolate
                1/4 cup (50 mL) butter
                1 tbsp. (15 mL) brandy or other liqueur
                2 eggs
                2 additional egg yolks
                1/4 cup (50 mL) granulated sugar
                1 tsp. (5 mL) vanilla
                1 tsp. (5 mL) instant coffee powder
                1 tbsp. (15 mL) all purpose flour
                whipped cream as an accompaniment

                In a small saucepan, combine the chocolate and butter and place over low heat. Cook, stirring, until the chocolate is melted and the mixture is smooth. Remove from heat and stir in the brandy. Let cool for a few minutes.

                Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, with an electric mixer, beat together the eggs, additional egg yolks, sugar, vanilla, and instant coffee powder until very thick, about 5 minutes. The mixture should form a gloopy ribbon when you lift the beater from the bowl. Fold in the flour and the chocolate mixture, mixing just until combined.

                Pour batter into four well-greased 3/4-cup (175 mL) custard cups or souffle dishes. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until about 45 minutes before you’re ready to serve dessert. (In fact, you can do this up to a whole day ahead of time. Really!)

                If refrigerated, remove from the refrigerator and let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes before baking.

                Preheat the oven to 400o F (200o C).

                Place custard cups on a baking sheet and bake for 11 to 13 minutes, until a toothpick poked into the center of one of the cups comes out with moist batter still attached. (These should be drastically underbaked in order to produce the crucial lava effect.) Let cool for 5 minutes, then carefully loosen the sides and turn them out onto individual serving plates.

                Whipped cream is mandatory. Chocolate shavings are optional.

                Makes 4 thoroughly evil servings.

                5 Replies
                1. re: Nyleve
                  BobB RE: Nyleve Nov 4, 2009 12:59 PM

                  Not sure a secondary (high school) student would be allowed to bring booze to school. ;-)

                  But I suppose you could leave it out without harming the recipe too much.

                  1. re: BobB
                    n
                    Nyleve RE: BobB Nov 4, 2009 03:45 PM

                    Oh! Of course! Heheheh. Absolutely can leave out the booze. One tablespoon makes very little difference in the end product.

                    But aren't Europeans more openminded about such things?

                  2. re: Nyleve
                    lemonsaregood RE: Nyleve Nov 5, 2009 10:54 AM

                    hi there :) these cakes sound brill :D will definitely take them into account. i looked up a different recipe online for these cakes, but your recipe sounds a lot nicer :) thanks for the help :))

                    p.s yes, i will leave out the booze :P sure it won't make much of a difference.

                    1. re: lemonsaregood
                      BobB RE: lemonsaregood Nov 5, 2009 10:59 AM

                      Good luck then, and thanks for coming back and letting us know what you thought of our suggestions. That was very courteous of you!

                      1. re: BobB
                        lemonsaregood RE: BobB Nov 5, 2009 11:25 AM

                        hahaa, thank you (: trying to break down the stereotype here at the same time. :)

                  3. q
                    Querencia RE: lemonsaregood Nov 4, 2009 05:12 PM

                    This date cake is delicious and takes five minutes to make. If you make it first and put it in the oven while doing the main course, it would fit in your time frame: QUICK DATE CAKE: Into food processor or blender put 1 cup dark brown sugar, 1 cup water, 2 eggs, 1/4 tsp salt, 2 tablespoons vegetable oil, 1 tsp baking soda, and the yellow rind of a lemon peeled off with a vegetable peeler. Process until smooth. Now, you are at a decision point. You are going to add 1 cup walnuts and 8-12 oz pitted dates, but what you do next will totally decide the character of this cake. If you want a moist torte with chunks of nut and date, perhaps more suitable as a dessert, just process very briefly until dates and nuts are somewhat chopped but still in significant pieces. However, if you want a delicate cake, I would say more of a tea cake really, keep processing until the nuts and dates are totally incorporated into the batter. and you will get an intense date flavor without actual dates. Whichever you do, bake the result in an 8 or 9-inch square pan at 350* for about 25 minutes. Serve warm with whipped cream.

                    1 Reply
                    1. re: Querencia
                      lemonsaregood RE: Querencia Nov 5, 2009 11:29 AM

                      mmm, sounds lovely :) hehe. will look into it. thanks very much for your help Querencia.

                    2. chef chicklet RE: lemonsaregood Nov 5, 2009 02:31 PM

                      What about a flan? I have a recipe for a very good flan that makes its own crust. It's coconut and served with whipped cream, totally delcious.

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