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Smoked Polish Kielbasa

mschow Oct 22, 2009 06:32 AM

I stopped at a pork store last week and picked up a few items including a freshly made smoked Polish Kielbasa. I have bought smoked sausage before but have only used it by cutting it up and putting it in soup. I''m sure this sausage is much better than what I have bought in the past from the regular grocery store. I'm not planning on using it in soup. Curious as to what other people do to prepare this type of sausage. TIA

  1. w
    weezycom Oct 22, 2009 07:39 AM

    Grill or roast it, slice and serve with hot pasta and shrimp in a parsley- garlic - olive oil toss.

    Use it as the flavor base for great braised cabbage.

    cook & crumble over a potato gratin

    1. MGZ Oct 22, 2009 09:04 AM

      Ahhh . . . A good kielbalsa is a wonderful thing - the greatest sausage. The most importatnt thing is not to overcook it. It's already been cooked by smoking and can be eaten as is! Most folks, however, prefer is hot.

      Fundamentally, you can treat it like a hot dog or brat - grill, boil, or roast and serve on an appropriate bun. That's good Giants Stadium fare that way - dress with a spicy Polish mustard and/or horseradish (especially the beet kind!)

      Otherwise, the more traditional way to prepare is similar to a choucroute garnie - with sourkraut. Basically, keep in mind rule #1 (don't overcook) and prepare the 'kraut in first. Add the kielbalsa whole, cover, and let it heat through - when the skin splits a bit your ready to eat. I don't believe in cutting up or piercing the sausage. This way you will retain more juice and flavor. Simply cut at the time of service. This dish would be an Easter favorite, typically along with at least a ham, some pierogi, and a bobka (and the aforementioned beet horseradish).

      (BTW - where'd you get it? European Provisions in South River/East Brunswick is our family fav, but there are a few other great ones in Central NJ.)

      3 Replies
      1. re: MGZ
        MGZ Oct 22, 2009 09:22 AM

        What's wrong with me? I completely forgot to mention the fact that any respectable Polish Easter would also require butter molded into the shape of a lamb and blessed by a local priest - preferably Father Stosh.

        1. re: MGZ
          mschow Oct 22, 2009 09:38 AM

          I bought the sausage at 'The Pork Roll Store' in Allentown. Also picked some of the best pork chops I have had in a very long time there. Funky little store, but the people were very nice. Here is a link for more info:
          http://www.merchantcircle.com/busines...
          Thanks to all for the cooking suggestions. I do have some of my all time favorite mustard on hand: Kosciusko.

          1. re: mschow
            MGZ Oct 24, 2009 06:44 AM

            Thanks. How can you not love a place with a name like that? I'll have to try to get down there.

      2. The Professor Oct 22, 2009 09:24 AM

        Great that you have a source for good quality Kielbasa. Here in NJ we're still blessed with local Polish and Hungarian specialty shops that have great Kielbasa and Kolbasz (the more flavorful Hungarian version). Some years ago, I learned to make my own. I still do at least one batch every month.

        So many people's experience is limited to inferior stuff like Hillshire Farms and the like (not that they're terrible, just that they bear little resemblance to the real thing). Roasting it is a good way to do fresh (uncooked, unsmoked) kielbasa/kolbasz, but for smoked sausage it's probably overkill and you do definitely run the risk of drying it out.
        I usually either poach them or better yet, steam them over saurkraut (to which some onion and paprika has been added along with a small splash of wine or a malt accented beer).
        As pointed out, best not to cut the sausage...rather, do that at serving time.

        Meat in a tube...what a concept...but it sure is good eating.

        1. chef chicklet Oct 24, 2009 08:08 AM

          I have not bought kielbasa it seems like forever. I have no idea why not, I love it.
          Growing up it was part of our family's dinner repetoire at least once a month and was my Dad's idea. German decent, he loved any sausage so of course it made its way onto the dinner table. I can recall my mom making it with saurkraut and small baby potatoes. And always there were about three different spicy mustards to eat it with. The weather's right, and it's good value for your money. The most interesting and best part (I thought) becuase I was always my Dad's food tester, was mashed potatoes with saurkraut, and topped with another piece of the sausausage. Sometimes he made them with mashed navy beans and kraut, topped again with the sausage. Geez, I'd forgotten those dishes, yum!

          1. ChristinaMason Oct 24, 2009 08:48 AM

            My favorite way is heated through over a bed of sauerkraut and topped with sliced onions that get nice and brown and crispy. If you don't have a nice prepared sauerkraut, you should probably get that going first. Rinse it and toss with some bay leaves, caraway seed, a little chopped apple, black peppercorns, and juniper berries (if you can find them), maybe a dash of sugar, even a little grated carrot. Once the kraut has mellowed out, put it into an oiled oven-safe dish, nestle the sausages partly in the kraut, then top those with sliced onions that have been tossed with a little olive oil, salt, pepper, and a sprinkling of sugar. I like to put all this in the oven at a high enough heat to crisp up the onions.
            Spicy mustard is a must. Enjoy your hearty fall eats!

            1. MrsCheese Oct 24, 2009 03:50 PM

              When I get kielbasa from our farmers, it's usually about 1.5 lbs so I split it into two meals. For the first, I usually cut the kielbasa into rounds, fry it, and serve it in a lentil salad. For the second, I cut into about 6 1-2 in. sections and split, and then heat in the oven until brown (the way my mom always did it). I serve it with hot German mustard and a starch, usually pierogies (a little bit of Cleveland stuck with me). I hate sauerkraut, but I'm sure my Penn Dutch husband would love it if I'd include some of that too (even the smell makes me queasy - I steer clear of my MIL's on New Years Day!).

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