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Natural Chinese Sausage

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Does anyone know if there's any place in LA where one can get really good and/or natural chinese sausage (lap cheong)? Does natural chinese sausage even exist? Thanks.

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  1. Never heard of anyone asking for "natural" Chinese sausage.
    Unless they sell it at Whole Foods, I don't know if it exists. It's one of those products that's so good you don't want to know what's in it. For some reason a lot of packaged lap cheong comes from Canada and I see it at places like the Alhambra Costco and it isn't refrigerated, so who knows what's in it.
    I think and someone will confirm or deny that Lucky Deli in LA Chinatown makes their own lap cheong, I see it hanging on the walls to dry. You might inquire there what they put in it.

    1. Most Chinese poultry places in LA seem to make their own lop cheong (if you can still find one). The problem is that they are closing up one by one. United and Canton Poultries are a couple that come to mind within the past few years. Even fresh dried salted duck are hard to find. I guess the best you can find now is the pre-packaged Kam Yen Jan brand found in most Chinese grocery stores? The "old-school" fresh dried lop cheong hanging on a string behind the counter is a thing of the past nowadays.

      1. Closest you'll get is probably a place like SinBaLa or Wan Chan.

        But if you want the best sausages -- Vietnamese style -- head out to Quan Tran in Rosemead. These are like the Vosages of chocolate bars.

        Quan Tran
        9000 Garvey Ave
        Rosemead

        1 Reply
        1. re: ipsedixit

          Was just at SinBaLa for their oily rice & sausages - what a gem.

        2. How about California Sausage?
          12821 Harbor Blvd., just north of Garden Grove Blvd., behind Lee's.

          No idea if it's "natural".

          1. I'd second the rec to check SinBaLa or any other place which serves Taiwanese sausage as they are typically natural/not dried.