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Farro

s
spicygal Sep 29, 2009 05:50 PM

While vacationing in Italy recently, I bought a bag of farro. There are no cooking instructions on the package. I am fairly confident that the saleslady was trying to tell me that this particular type of farro did not need to be soaked overnight. But otherwise I'm clueless as to how to prepare it.

Does anyone know how to properly cook farro? Recipes?

Thanks.

  1. erica Sep 30, 2009 03:29 PM

    Even if they do spell farro wrong in the ingredient list, this is an excellent recipe.

    http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ma...

    1. s
      spicygal Sep 30, 2009 02:45 PM

      Thanks! These all look great. I'll report back ...

      1. GretchenS Sep 30, 2009 07:22 AM

        I love farro! Never soak it. I dry toast it in the pan, stirring and watching very carefully so as not to burn it. Once it starts smelling toasty, add water to cover by an inch, a pinch of salt, and simmer until it's how you like it -- anywhere from 25 to 35 minutes, like beans it depends a bit how old it is. Drain well. Bonus: farro freezes well so you can cook your whole package, freeze what you don't use and have it on hand.

        My two favorite farro recipes:

        Warm Farro and Bean Salad

        Gently heat together cooked farro, cannellini beans, blanched diced or sliced carrots, thinly-sliced celery, dried plums (AKA prunes) cut into eighths. Top with strips of prosciutto (crisped in olive oil if desired) and lots of coarsely-chopped parsley. Variation: instead of prosciutto use crumbled goat cheese or feta and toasted pistachios.

        Farro with Kale, Wild Mushrooms and Goat Cheese

        Sauté a mix of sliced wild mushrooms in olive oil. Add thinly-sliced garlic and a pinch of red pepper flakes. Stir in cooked farro, blanched ribbons of lacinto (dinosaur) kale and a slurp of water and heat through. Stir in a good squeeze of lemon juice and top with crumbled goat cheese. Lately I have been adding toasted pistachios to this too. I have served it 3 times in the past couple of months to people who were very suspicious that no meat was involved ("shall I pick up some chicken?") and all of them not only loved it but demanded the recipe. It's great with tomatoes baked with breadcrumbs on top or with a pear-frisee-gorgonzola salad.

        1. m
          Mel.D Sep 30, 2009 07:05 AM

          I just bought a bag of farro over the weekend and it was the first time I’d used it and I looked up some recipes and wound up making a farro and butternut squash with walnuts and goat cheese salad and it was great.
          I think I only boiled it for about 30 minutes and didn’t presoak, and it was fine.
          Here is the recipe:
          http://www.101cookbooks.com/archives/...

          1. Zeldog Sep 29, 2009 07:20 PM

            Here's a good link for cooking instructions

            http://www.sunset.com/food-wine/healthy/go-with-the-old-grain-00400000024368/

            How long you cook it depends on how you like it. Some like it al dente and some like it soft. If it's done to your liking before all the liquid is gone, just pour off the excess.

            And here's a recent thread with some recipes.

            http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/635345

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