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pizza dough without yeast?

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is this possible? can i use baking powder instead? TIA.

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  1. If you do, it's not pizza dough. Pizza is a bread product, which means yeast.

    1. You "can" do it but it tastes sort of odd - not odd for biscuits, but odd for pizza dough. (Many moons ago there was a very mediocre NYC pizzeria that used Bisquick which explained a lot the day I happened to see an empty carton through the back window.)

      Edit: re "bread products". Bread products by any definition I can think of certainly include breads that are not leavened at all, as well as breads that are made with chemical leaveners. They're not "pizza", but they are "bread."

      1. One of my friends mums made something like this once. I think pizza was a little bit foreign to her; she made a big square of pastry with tomato and cheddar on. It wasn't bad, but it wasn't pizza

        1. I agree with the others that it won't be like pizza. But you could do more of a flatbread. I would use this recipe as a base, maybe skipping the rosemary. Pre-bake it, then put your toppings on and return to the oven just until they are warm.

          1 3/4 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
          1 tablespoon chopped rosemary plus 2 (6-inch) sprigs
          1 teaspoon baking powder
          3/4 teaspoon salt
          1/2 cup water
          1/3 cup olive oil plus more for brushing
          Flaky sea salt such as Maldon

          Preheat oven to 450°F with a heavy baking sheet on rack in middle.

          Stir together flour, chopped rosemary, baking powder, and salt in a medium bowl. Make a well in center, then add water and oil and gradually stir into flour with a wooden spoon until a dough forms. Knead dough gently on a work surface 4 or 5 times.

          Divide dough into 3 pieces and roll out 1 piece (keep remaining pieces covered with plastic wrap) on a sheet of parchment paper into a 10-inch round (shape can be rustic; dough should be thin).

          Lightly brush top with additional oil and scatter small clusters of rosemary leaves on top, pressing in slightly. Sprinkle with sea salt. Slide round (still on parchment) onto preheated baking sheet and bake until pale golden and browned in spots, 8 to 10 minutes. Transfer flatbread (discard parchment) to a rack to cool, then make 2 more rounds (1 at a time) on fresh parchment (do not oil or salt until just before baking). Break into pieces.

          Flatbread can be made 2 days ahead and cooled completely, then kept in an airtight container at room temperature.

          1 Reply
          1. re: katecm

            thank you very much for the recipe - i'm all set now for sunday lunch. thanks to the others too for responding.

          2. Buy matzoh.

            2 Replies
            1. re: greygarious

              Not a bad idea. I used to have lunch at a place outside Chicago that made small pizzas using unleavened flatbread and they were very good. But it was made in house and hand formed, and didn't taste like crackers as store bought matzoh usually does.

              Hey, epabella, what have you got against yeast?

              1. re: Zeldog

                nothing against yeast, sometimes i run out and am too lazy to go to the store.

            2. Many years ago, I used to make a slow-rising pizza dough that used boiled potatoes. I would start the dough in the morning and it would be ready to roll by the end of the day. It makes a moist and chewy dough and the pizza could be reheated successfully. The recipe is in "The Complete Book of Pizza" by Louise Love. If you are interested I can paraphrase the method.

              1 Reply
              1. re: AntarcticWidow

                This slow rising dough sounds like it took advantage of natural yeast spores in the air...so it is not really yeast free.

                Anyway, a pizza made with a non-yeast dough just won't really be a pizza.
                Period.

              2. This is called a ... cracker.