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Kiddush catering in NYC

l
luvinduvin Aug 25, 2009 01:09 PM

My smallish Manhattan shul now uses Supersol for our standard shabbos kiddush catering on an almost every week basis (unless someone wants it from a particular place). We're looking for a cheaper option that is at least as good. Anyone know of any good options of places that would deliver to the Upper West Side for a regular, though not huge, gig?

  1. m
    mrmoose Aug 25, 2009 03:29 PM

    What is the menu and how many people?

    8 Replies
    1. re: mrmoose
      l
      luvinduvin Aug 25, 2009 05:37 PM

      about 150 people. Menu is usually herring, gefilte fish, kugel, sometimes salads, sometimes chulent

      1. re: luvinduvin
        m
        mrmoose Aug 26, 2009 07:37 AM

        So it is at least $300 a week? Try Meiseners in Boro Park and see if they will deliver. If the will I am sure they will give you much more for your money 718-552-3718 ask for Tuvya.

        1. re: mrmoose
          l
          luvinduvin Aug 26, 2009 09:46 AM

          Yes, it's more than $300. Thanks for the tip!

          1. re: luvinduvin
            t
            The Cameraman Sep 7, 2009 10:40 AM

            Our shul has a kiddush every Shabbos. We catered for the first few weeks, but then we realized it would be much, much cheaper to buy a 5 gallon crockpot, make our own chulent, and just buy cake and soda. Now we can do kiddush for 50 to 70 people for under $65. 150 people shouldn't be more than $125, considering economies of scale.

            Also, eliminating the herring (except on special occasions) means that people eat more of the meal at home, which causes fewer sholom bayis issues.

            Chulent is very cheap to make (ten bucks worth of meat, ten bucks worth of beans, five bucks worth of barley, and some spices- potatoes are for Polish Jews) and usually takes about 30 minutes to throw together. Also, everyone can argue for fifteen minutes about how "the chulent was better/worse last week", and thus arguments about more substantial matters are avoided.

            The President is the only one allowed to make the chulent, although if the President is incapacitated or unavailable the gabbai or another person appointed by the President is allowed to make the chulent, and everyone is obligated to comment that "the chulent is better when (the President) makes it".

            If the President and the gabbai are assasinated (lo aleinu), Chulent making duties devolves upon the candyman until a special election can be held, with the person shouting the loudest becoming the new President.

            I feel as though this post has gotten away from me, somehow, but it's Labor Day and I'm sitting in my office with absolutely no customers or work to do. Sorry.

            1. re: The Cameraman
              z
              zsero Sep 7, 2009 11:01 AM

              That's one way to do it. At my shul the rabbi makes the cholent, so nobody is allowed to criticise it :-) And it's vegetarian, which is not only cheaper, but also allows people to have a milchig lunch afterwards.

              1. re: The Cameraman
                a
                avitrek Sep 7, 2009 03:25 PM

                For 50 people I hope you would use more than $10 of meat. That gets you one pound, maybe two pounds depending on where you shop. That gets you .64 oz of meat/person.

                1. re: avitrek
                  t
                  The Cameraman Sep 9, 2009 01:26 PM

                  The meat is mostly for flavoring, which is why we usually get a fatty cut.

                  What can I say, it's a "heimishe" (in context: cheap as possible because our great grandparents were mostly paupers) cholent.

                2. re: The Cameraman
                  v
                  vallevin Sep 8, 2009 08:04 AM

                  I'm guessing somewhere in the above post, Cameraman is stating that someone had taken taken on the responsibility of making a BIG cholent every Shabbos. Meat, Beans (canned I assume?), barley, and spices.

                  Who cleans the pot?

                  On a serious note, it's not so easy to get your shul members to sign onto a weekly responsibility like that. Kol HaKavod

        2. c
          craigcep Sep 7, 2009 10:26 AM

          Eretz on Columbus?

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