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Beef or Bison suitable for serving raw in MSP?

t
tex.s.toast Aug 17, 2009 06:23 PM

So i dont have the money to eat at alma as much as I want, but considering the savings (and fun!) of making things at home id be wiling to pay a fair price for some prime tenderloin or other cut suitable for making into tartare. I'd ideally like the butcher to vouch for their processing enough to endorse eating it raw, but realize that for legal reasons few probably will (both the meat counters at the seward and wedge were nice but said they would not recommend eating their meats in a raw preparation).

Assuming I know no one with a cow that is soon to kick the bucket, where can i find what i need?

  1. t
    tex.s.toast Aug 26, 2009 05:49 PM

    Reporting back - went with clancey's who told me that they would feel comfortable eating pretty much any of their meat uncooked - though they couldnt endorse doing so (presumably for legal reasons). Ended up getting some sirloin that was really tasty and well recieved.

    I know that the contamination issues arise from the extra surface area of ground meat and buying a whole piece and grinding (i used knives not a grinder) it at home is probably less risky than eating store-bought ground meat not cooked fully in burger form anyway.

    thanks for all the tips, it was a fun excuse to get over to clancey's and talk with the nice folks over there.

    1. f
      foreverhungry Aug 26, 2009 03:40 PM

      If you buy a whole piece of meat, wash it well, and grind it yourself, the meat should be perfectly safe. The main issue with meat contamination is during the grinding process, when the surface area is increased and meat grinders can get contaminated. But with a whole chunk of beef or bison, as long as you rinse it, you should have no issues. I wouldn't be terribly concerned about where you are getting it from, as long as it's a reputable butcher.

      1. w
        wineman3 Aug 20, 2009 02:05 PM

        If all meat is government inspected after slaughter then it is just a matter of how many hands it has passed through to get to where you buy it from...........so if you are making tartare then use Filet of beef or Buffalo its all the same chance you are taking. For myself I would do it no problem. Also those guys that said they would not reccomend eating raw meat the they are just ........ weak.

        1. g
          galewskj Aug 18, 2009 08:34 AM

          I've never done this, but I have seriously thought about it. I would go to the Saint Paul farmers market and ask the farmers (ranchers?) what they thought of it. That way at least you are buying it from the people who raised the beef/bison and there is as little handling as possible buying it from the source. Plus, it's likely that these people operate a cleaner facility than even the fancy stuff from Byerlys. If they gave the ok, I'd give it a try.

          2 Replies
          1. re: galewskj
            t
            tex.s.toast Aug 18, 2009 11:14 AM

            My concern would be with the frozen state of much of the meat available through independent/farmers market producers. I have a connection to a bison-grower but they don't process any of the meat themselves so id be at the mercy of their contract processor. It seems like this should be a good way to do it but im just not sure - i guess in an ideal world id have it timed so they would have just processed a whole animal and could get me what i wanted, but it doesn't seem like most of them are set up to accommodate something like that.

            1. re: tex.s.toast
              g
              getgot211 Aug 18, 2009 01:18 PM

              yeah I wouldn't want to use frozen meat for that. you could probably ask at any of the butchers when they get the carcass and request a specific cut on that day. this would be particularly easy at Clancey's.

          2. c
            churchka Aug 17, 2009 07:53 PM

            I've made tartare from the beef from Lunds and from Seward Co-op. No one is going to say it is safe. Good luck.

            2 Replies
            1. re: churchka
              t
              tex.s.toast Aug 17, 2009 08:13 PM

              I figured as much, but all the advice i've seen across other threads and sites has been, go with someone you trust, but i guess they all live in lala land where liability laws don't apply.

              when you made it what cut did you use?

              1. re: tex.s.toast
                c
                churchka Aug 18, 2009 09:01 AM

                Sirloin per Anthony Bourdain's recipe.

                Also, I agree with Laura above to check out Coastal Seafood. They are used to dealing with food meant to be eaten raw, so they may have some insight.

            2. l
              LauraB Aug 17, 2009 07:23 PM

              I have eaten beef carpaccio with meat from Coastal Seafood. I do not know if they would actually endorse this idea or not, but they might be a good place to look.

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