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Cake pop freezing question plus fondant storage issue

l
Laura D. Aug 15, 2009 03:58 PM

I'm planning a birthday cake/birthday creation that might involve cake pops. While I've never made a cake pop before I understand the technique and think it would work well for the occasion. My question, though, is how freezable they are. I don't anticipate any problems caused by mixing the cake and icing together, molding it, and then freezing it on a stick before usage, but I'm wondering whether whatever I dip it into--likely melted colored candy melts (but perhaps either dark chocolate or white chocolate) would discolor or fade in the freezer for two weeks. Anyone have any ideas about this? Also, I'll probably dip the cake pops in some sort of topping (be it candy melts, dark chocolate, or white chocolate) and then decorate it with something like colored candy melts or colored white chocolate, colored with paste food coloring or oil based food coloring for candy decorations. So, they won't just be a solid color but instead will be a base color covering the cake and then decorations in color on top of that. To give you an idea, it will be decorated to look like a mushroom from the Mario Bros. games...so whites, reds, greens, etc. with a likely base coat of either white chocolate or white candy melts.

Also, instead of or possibly in addition to the cake pops I might use fondant to make shapes that will be decorations for the dessert. The fondant will definitely be colored, and I'm not particularly concerned how it will taste due to what I'm using it for (it is pure decoration and not something I anticipate people eating). I'm hoping to deal with making the decorations with the fondant two weeks ahead of time. Will the shapes be okay in an airtight container for about two weeks? Will I have any problems with the colors fading or bleeding? Will it stay reasonably soft it is covered?

Sorry for the cryptic questions...I'm still in the planning stages of this dessert and am going on vacation until the day before it is to be presented to the birthday boy. I'm just trying to get a feel for which techniques will allow the most work to be done before I leave. Thanks!

  1. l
    Laura D. Aug 16, 2009 01:50 PM

    Changing my idea slightly (maybe). I'm thinking of perhaps using sugar cookies instead of the cakeballs to serve as a decoration on my sheet cake...just trust me on this as it isn't worth explaining. But, my question is, if I baked sugar cookies in shapes ahead of time, and then decorated them with a glaze that would be colored and would ideally be hardened/solid at the time of freezing, would the colors and the glaze thaw okay? When is say glaze I'm thinking a red or green royal icing with white spots. If the white spots might get bled into upon thawing then I could add them on the day of after the cookies have thawed, though ideally I'd love to have the cookie finished upon freezing. The spots could either be white royal icing or a buttercream if the added height/texture would work better. Another option is using colored buttercream instead of a royal icing type of glaze, and then adding on the spots with non-colored buttercream. But, I think that perhaps the flatness and smoothness (as well as the potential sheen) of royal icing or a similar glaze would work better. Thanks for your help!

    1. r
      Raspberries Aug 15, 2009 11:38 PM

      I have made any number of cake pops before, frozen them, and had no problems. As a matter of fact, I have a batch in the freezer right now. (I always have a batch in the freezer as an emergency dessert or snack. I prefer eating them frozen anyway.) Typically, I freeze only plain pops, covered in tempered chocolate. As far as freezing heavily decorated pops go, especially with a base coat of white, I'd be a little cautious. When the pops come to room temp, there's going to be condensation and the decorations (I'm not sure if you're using sprinkles, sanding sugar, fondant, gumpaste, etc) might be ill affected. If, for instance, you're using red sprinkles, the color could run. Fondant and gumpaste shouldn't be frozen at all - the condensation would "melt" either. Maybe you want to make them and freeze them plain, then defrost, then decorate?

      As far as fondant decorations go, making them ahead of time, two weeks or more, is perfectly fine. EXCEPT that it sounds like you want to keep it soft. Fondant dries out quickly. Even rolling it out to cover a cake, you've got to work quickly. If you lollygag, you'd get cracks. Within the course of an hour or so, a small decoration (like a thin cut-out) would be completely dry and brittle and would certainly break if you tried to bend it.

      What kind of decorations do you need to do with fondant? If it’s something that you could use hard (often, it’s much easier to use then, particularly if you’re inexperienced with it), I’d give yourself lots of time to let it dry completely – not in an airtight container – and then use royal icing or gum paste glue to anchor it to whatever you need (or, set it directly onto buttercream). Keep it out of bright light, so it won't fade.

      Let me know if you have any other questions -

      1 Reply
      1. re: Raspberries
        l
        Laura D. Aug 16, 2009 06:34 AM

        Thanks for the reply. I hadn't thought of the condensation issue and probably wouldn't finish decorating the cake pops before freezing...I'd just do the base coat of tempered chocolate or candy melts and decorate with the colored designs on the day of the party. To be honest, it probably isn't a big deal if the fondant hardens for what I'd using it for...I just thought I'd ask about whether I could keep it soft in the event that I wanted to mold it into a certain shape on the day of the event, but I can definitely make it work with hardened fondant.

        Thanks!

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